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  #61  
Old 07 April 2007, 08:16 AM
Neffti
 
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[QUOTE=Signora Del Drago;126652]I linked to that Q & A in my post above. /QUOTE]

So you did - sorry about that!

Another thought about the film - the scene where Johnny gets hurt by the bull is pretty distressing. It's not graphic, but it certainly gets the adrenalin pumping. This could be another reason that Disney is reluctant to promote it.
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  #62  
Old 07 April 2007, 04:34 PM
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Signora Del Drago Signora Del Drago is offline
 
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It's hard to see everything in these long threads, so no worry--it mainly gave me a chance to mention the essays again. I had been wondering how to do that without looking like a board hog by posting all of that again. But I did want everyone to see them.

I hadn't thought of that, but with all the gore and violence children are exposed to today, that probably wouldn't faze most of them. I remember being horrified, but I can't remember the scene. Wonder if I blocked it out. We never know how children are going to react, though. We took our granddaughter to see "Cinderella" when she was about three, and on the way home, she asked, "Grandmother, why did 'Cindrells' mean old friend rip her dress off of her?" I had a heck of a time trying to come up with an explanation without using the "mean step-mother" thing. I don't even remember what I said, now.
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  #63  
Old 31 May 2007, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemis View Post
Hold up...what's controversial or unsuitable about early Sesame Street?
Finally. I've been waiting for my account activation so I could comment on the whole Sesame Street disclaimer thing!! I mean, not that I'm a big know-it-all or anything, but I do know this one....

Anyway, the actual disclaimer on the DVD is as follows:

Quote:
"Welcome to Sesame Street Nostalgia. I am Bob, your host, and I want you to know that these early Sesame Street episodes are intended for grown-ups and may not meet the needs of today's pre-school child."
A spokeswoman from CTW said that the disclaimer is because the kids in the 70's Sesame did things like playing in a dump or whatever, and since we're so (overly?) protective of our kids today. it wouldn't set a good example. Also, it might upset kids to see Oscar in his old orange fur. And, although I can't kind a reference for this, I've also heard that the learning methods from the 70s were different than the learning methods used to teach kids today, and it might confuse them.


Either way around that last issue, the disclaimer isn't because anything could be offensive. Just because they did things that would maybe set a bad safety example for todays kids.

Nice to finally get to say something here. I'm a long-time lurker.....

~Dana
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  #64  
Old 31 May 2007, 02:25 PM
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This is a very interesting thread. When I searched for a copy of Song of the South, I read a lot of articles on the U.S. re-release issue. The thrust of most opposition was on the idea that Uncle Remus was portrayed as a happy, content man even in his circumstances.

I am disabled with multiple sclerosis, but consider myself happy and content in my life. Did I choose this? NO. Did Uncle Remus choose his situation? NO. What Uncle Remus and I have in common is that we have chosen to live positive lives despite the obstacles in our paths.

Personally, I find the portrayal of A.A.s far more offensive in "Gangsta Rap" than that of a loving, caring man who gives from his heart.

I found my copy in the UK and was able to convert it with my DVD recorder.
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  #65  
Old 31 May 2007, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danamac448 View Post
Finally. I've been waiting for my account activation so I could comment on the whole Sesame Street disclaimer thing!! I mean, not that I'm a big know-it-all or anything, but I do know this one....

Anyway, the actual disclaimer on the DVD is as follows:



A spokeswoman from CTW said that the disclaimer is because the kids in the 70's Sesame did things like playing in a dump or whatever, and since we're so (overly?) protective of our kids today. it wouldn't set a good example. Also, it might upset kids to see Oscar in his old orange fur. And, although I can't kind a reference for this, I've also heard that the learning methods from the 70s were different than the learning methods used to teach kids today, and it might confuse them.


Either way around that last issue, the disclaimer isn't because anything could be offensive. Just because they did things that would maybe set a bad safety example for todays kids.

Nice to finally get to say something here. I'm a long-time lurker.....

~Dana
Thanks, Dana, I've been wondering about this since it was first mentioned.

Welcome to the boards!
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  #66  
Old 01 June 2007, 09:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mosherette View Post
Can someone enlighten me as to what the film's racism entails? I've never seen it, or really heard of it beyond these boards, and have no idea what's racist about it.



Not to mention that character in the Beano, or was it the Dandy? Never mind: I got both when I was young (early to mid 1980s).
Beano. Little Plum
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  #67  
Old 04 June 2007, 01:27 AM
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I remember seeing Song of the South on TV when I was a youngster- it would have been about 1978 (BV-before videos), I was with my cousin and it was raining so we were thoroughly bored (we were used to tearing around outside on bikes so to be shut in was torture). The movie was almost half way through when we started watching.

My aunt spotted what was on and sat with us giving a running commentry all the way about how badly Uncle Remus would have been treated as a slave and explained why it was a sad time in USAian history. It was how we learned about slavery and its role in USA's history. I remember being shocked by what she was saying but most of all I was shocked by the fact that my usually prim and proper, spotless aunt was sitting on the lime green bean bags with us and letting us snuggle up to her with our sticky toffee covered fingers- she'd NEVER done that before.
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  #68  
Old 07 June 2007, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by We'veBeenHad View Post
She thought and thinks breastfeeding is just about the nastiest thing; only for trashy poor people who can't afford or don't know anything better. (I may have been born in the sixties but my parents were no hippies.)

.
My grandmom is the same way. I breastfed all three of my kids as long as I was able (for some reason I always lost my milk sometime between 3 and 5 months; I'd've loved to have gone longer) and she had fits. Couldn't I afford milk? Well couldn't some government organization buy me some milk, so I didn't have to [long pause] NURSE [spoken with great distaste] 'em?

If I said that baby had been fussy last night, sh was quick with "Maybe your milk's not agreeing with him. You might have to buy him some milk." If I said I needed to buy a pump, she wondered aloud if that was really good for my breasts. If I said something about going out to eat, she freaked out- what would I do if the baby got hungry? Did they have a big enough bathroom in that resturaunt I could go sit down? And boy you wanna about make her burst into tears, you just explain to her that I fully intended to nurse at the table while I ate!!

Heh heh. I want to have another baby just so I can grate her poor old nerves with all that again....no, scratch that. I want another baby anyway, grating her nerves would be a bonus.
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  #69  
Old 06 July 2007, 02:36 AM
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Macleans magazine article on the subject:

Zip-a-dee-doo-don't mention it
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  #70  
Old 07 July 2007, 07:03 PM
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Signora Del Drago Signora Del Drago is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jelly Bean Queen View Post
My aunt spotted what was on and sat with us giving a running commentry all the way about how badly Uncle Remus would have been treated as a slave and explained why it was a sad time in USAian history. It was how we learned about slavery and its role in USA's history. I remember being shocked by what she was saying. . .
One word: Aborigines.

From the article linked by PrincessLeia (bolding mine):
Quote:
Meanwhile, despite Song of the South's reputation as a "lost" film, it's really only "lost" in North America. Though Iger claimed that "ethics and integrity" demand that the film be suppressed, it's on television in England every year, and several countries have been allowed to release it on home video. So how would Hill, for one, sum up the Disney company's attitude to Song of the South? This way: " 'We're keeping it on moratorium in the United States because this is where all the pains in the ass live.' "
Right on!
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  #71  
Old 09 July 2007, 02:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Signora Del Drago View Post
One word: Aborigines.
Never said Australians were proud of the way Aborigines were treated when the British invaded their land. It's similar to the genocide perpetrated on Native Americans when Europeans invaded their land ie whole cultural groups wiped out, disease deliberately spread into communities, theft of their land, poisoning water etc. We've been asking our prime minister to make a treaty and apologise for at least the last 20 years-I have done a great deal of volunteer work on Sorry Day petitions and campaigns. Slavery and invasion, I think, are two completely different issues and crimes.
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  #72  
Old 19 July 2007, 05:03 AM
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I am so glad I finally am "officially" on this board because I have been wondering about all this and now I get not just the truth, but fascinating insight from you folks! I love Snopes.
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  #73  
Old 19 July 2007, 05:19 AM
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Welcome aboard! Sounds like you took the same route I did - lurk for a long while and finally get up the nerve to join. (I'm sure someone or other will steer you to the initiation thread in any case)
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  #74  
Old 25 July 2007, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizywyg View Post
How nice. It is a movie that should be watched ; since its reflective of the time it was animated in.


anyone who has picked up teh recenlty released DVD's of Sesame Streets' (earlier years); there is a Warning lable that comes with it, which surprised the heck out of me

They warn that the content may not be suitable for kids; because it was made in a time and generation for a different audience.
Since Sesame Street started in 1969, perhaps they used racial or ethic terms that were acceptable then, but are not PC now. Also terms for the "differently-abled" have changed over the years.

I also found a bit of triva on IMDB - "Unfortunately, some classic Muppets have been canned over the years for interesting reasons. Don Music, the piano player who would bang his head against the piano in frustration, had to be discontinued when kids at home started doing the same thing. Roosevelt Franklin, arguably one of the first breakthrough Sesame Street Muppets, had to go as he was considered to be a negative cultural stereotype (he was the only African American Muppet at the time and was seen mostly in detention after school). "

Also, "Originally, the character of Snuffleupagus only ever interacted with Big Bird. He'd always come and go when no one else was around, and consequently no one ever believed Big Bird when he told them of his existence. The producers decided to reveal him to the other characters partially because they felt it was sending a bad message to children that adults will not believe them if they have something important to tell them."
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  #75  
Old 25 July 2007, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eif View Post
Since Sesame Street started in 1969, perhaps they used racial or ethic terms that were acceptable then, but are not PC now.
For example, my grandmother uses the word "colored." When she was young, that was the polite word for a black person. Today, it is seen as less than PC.

Quote:
I also found a bit of triva on IMDB - "Unfortunately, some classic Muppets have been canned over the years for interesting reasons. Don Music, the piano player who would bang his head against the piano in frustration, had to be discontinued when kids at home started doing the same thing.
Yeah, that was me. Sorry about that. It scared the hell out of the teachers at my daycare!
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  #76  
Old 19 October 2007, 09:32 AM
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What I find strange about the whole Song of the South issue is, Disney won't re-release it because it isn't PC enough, but..................

they put up Splash Mountain in DisneyLand 1989 and WDW in 1992. Now a few generations have not seen the movie so they have no idea what the story line in the ride is about.

Also, Disney didn't invent Uncle Remus or any of the stories told by the character. These stories are from circa 1850. And the way people behaved in the movie is sadly how people behaved during that era.

You can buy this movie online. It is a great movie. Right, wrong or otherwise, it shouldn't be pushed under the carpet because it talks about things in our past that make some uncomfortable.

JMO,
WildGrits (in my laughing place)
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  #77  
Old 26 October 2007, 04:41 PM
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I bought a copy of SotS, back in the 90's, from someone who imported Japanese laserdisks of movies that were not released here, mainly Kaiju movies, then sold VHS copies from them.

What was interesting, on the japanese copies, was that the dialogue wasn't subbed into Japanese, but the songs all had Japanese subtitles.

I would be glad to get a good DVD version of the movie, if they ever release it, but I am not holding my breath.
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  #78  
Old 17 November 2007, 07:46 PM
KingDavid8 KingDavid8 is offline
 
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I was at a friend's house last week and he had a DVD of some old Bugs Bunny cartoons from the early 1940's, and there was one where Bugs was being hunted by a black guy with thick lips, a squeaky voice, and a very big butt. The guy was also an idiot, but no more so than Elmer Fudd, so I'm not sure that part would qualify as racist or stereotypical. I'm a little surprised that WB included this one for release. I don't see much wrong with adults watching it, who might understand the times it was made in, but I'd hate to plug that disk in for some kids and have them see that.

I also remember seeing a Bugs Bunny back when I was a kid (late seventies) in which Bugs is battling with Yosimite Sam, and there's a part where Bugs hands Sam a whip, then throws himself to the ground, yelling, "Don't beat me, Massah!"

David
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  #79  
Old 17 November 2007, 08:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingDavid8 View Post
I was at a friend's house last week and he had a DVD of some old Bugs Bunny cartoons from the early 1940's, and there was one where Bugs was being hunted by a black guy with thick lips, a squeaky voice, and a very big butt. The guy was also an idiot, but no more so than Elmer Fudd, so I'm not sure that part would qualify as racist or stereotypical. I'm a little surprised that WB included this one for release. I don't see much wrong with adults watching it, who might understand the times it was made in, but I'd hate to plug that disk in for some kids and have them see that.

I also remember seeing a Bugs Bunny back when I was a kid (late seventies) in which Bugs is battling with Yosimite Sam, and there's a part where Bugs hands Sam a whip, then throws himself to the ground, yelling, "Don't beat me, Massah!"

David
The first would be "All This and Rabbit Stew" (1941), directed by Tex Avery. The hunter is a take-off on Stepin Fetchit, a popular actor of the time who specialized in slow-moving, slow-talking, stereotypical characterizations.

The second is "Southern Fried Rabbit" (1953), directed by Friz Freling.
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