snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > SLC Central > SLC

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #641  
Old 04 August 2017, 02:23 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 73,368
Default

Even trying to chop fresh peppers in a chopping jar like this one yields mush, IME.
Reply With Quote
  #642  
Old 05 August 2017, 02:45 AM
Mouse's Avatar
Mouse Mouse is offline
 
Join Date: 10 July 2003
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 6,789
Mouse

Is there a reason there is so many names for Mountain Lions? You can refer to them as Mountain Lions, Cougars, Pumas, Panthers, and Catamounts, and all the names would be correct. How did this cat wind up with so many names? I don't know of any other big cat that racked up so many different names.
Reply With Quote
  #643  
Old 05 August 2017, 10:13 AM
Crius of CoH's Avatar
Crius of CoH Crius of CoH is online now
 
Join Date: 13 February 2006
Location: Paragon City (Cranston), RI
Posts: 1,595
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
Is there a reason there is so many names for Mountain Lions? You can refer to them as Mountain Lions, Cougars, Pumas, Panthers, and Catamounts, and all the names would be correct. How did this cat wind up with so many names? I don't know of any other big cat that racked up so many different names.
They are Just. That. Awesome.
Reply With Quote
  #644  
Old 05 August 2017, 10:15 AM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,856
Default

That cat has a lot of names in English. But don't the lion and tiger, for instance, have a lot of names in various places in Africa and Asia? (I don't know for sure; but it seems extremely likely.)
Reply With Quote
  #645  
Old 05 August 2017, 11:15 AM
ganzfeld's Avatar
ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
Join Date: 05 September 2005
Location: Kyoto, Japan
Posts: 23,007
Hello Kitty

My wag is that it's that they've always been relatively uncommon (to encounter) and were rediscovered many times, each time causing a new word to be borrowed (or coined) and used for a while before the realisation that there was already a word or four. Unlike them, tigers and lions have been well known for millennia and have rather striking appearances; their mane and stripes are easy to describe. The cougar, on the other hand, can appear very differently by subspecies and coloration (cf black panther, which is a different cat) and has some striking features of its own but not necessarily the same ones every time.
Reply With Quote
  #646  
Old 05 August 2017, 11:49 PM
smittykins's Avatar
smittykins smittykins is offline
 
Join Date: 27 December 2003
Location: Seneca Falls, NY
Posts: 2,475
Default

When discussing Chaz Bono's childhood, is it appropriate to use female pronouns?
Reply With Quote
  #647  
Old 06 August 2017, 01:46 AM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
Join Date: 22 March 2001
Location: Yorktown Heights, NY
Posts: 1,053
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smittykins View Post
is it appropriate to use female pronouns?
From experience (not with him), no.
Reply With Quote
  #648  
Old 06 August 2017, 12:38 PM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
Join Date: 11 November 2005
Location: Oxford, PA
Posts: 3,776
Default

From experience with my nephew who was my niece until about 20, yes. He was a girl, now he is not. (It gets confusing, and I think each person might be different, so it is best to just not ever discuss anything at all for fear of giving offense. ) Or you hope you have someone who is pretty cool, like my nephew, and is willing to give people the benefit of the doubt, and is also quite willing to explain when asked.
Reply With Quote
  #649  
Old 13 August 2017, 10:00 AM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 25,185
Default

Is anybody into cryptic crosswords?

Here's a clue from an old Times crossword (the London one not New York), which I have in a collection:

Eye one initially appearing during Debussy piece? (4-5)

I had all the letters, and the answer was clearly "LATE-COMER" but I couldn't see why. I thought there must be a piece of music by Debussy called The Late-comer or something similar. (The answers are in the book so I could have checked that part, but the answers don't explain why they're the answers).

So I Googled "Debussy The Latecomer" to see if this piece of music came up, and instead, everything that came up were crossword solving sites, giving this answer to clues about Debussy. This exact clue came up, with the answer LATE COMER, and so did the clue:

Private eye's over interrupting Debussy piece ___ being this? (9)

(I think that one is from a New York Times crossword, so it follows different conventions from the ones I'm used to).

So now I'm wondering why this is. The "eye" in my clue may be a detective as well, since the other clue has "Private eye". Usually that would be something meaning "eye" or "detective", inside another word, and possibly backwards (if the NYT conventions match the ones I know well enough).

But is there a Debussy piece called The Latecomer to form the overall definition? And if there is, why is it invisible to Google, to the extent that the only connection between the two appears to be in crossword clues? I found a book with an anecdote about Debussy hating to conduct his pieces, which also included a description of people turning up late to a concert, but there was no obvious link between them.

I can't work out the construction of this clue at all, and it's annoying me more than usual!

(eta) Never mind... reading more of the results always helps. The second clue is actually from Phi in The Independent, and further on in the search results I found an actual explanation:

http://www.fifteensquared.net/2012/1...dent-8135-phi/

Quote:
10 Private eye’s over interrupting Debussy piece – being this?
LATECOMER TEC (private eye) + O (over) inside or ‘interrupting’ LA MER (Debussy piece) = if you were a latecomer you would interrupt the concert!
So the Debussy piece is La Mer. The same explanation works for my clue, with "O" being "one initially", and the definition in mine is the whole clue (again, if you "appear during the piece" you're a latecomer...)

I wonder whether Phi wrote the Times crossword as well (The Times doesn't name its setters) or if one of them cribbed from the other? Either way, I'd never have worked that explanation out myself from the clue I was attempting.

Also, the site I quoted above has mangled the second clue to put a "blank space" indicator where there should just be a dash. (It had also messed up the punctuation by having a double quote instead of the apostrophe in "eye's", but I corrected that when quoting it). That misled me as well.

Last edited by Richard W; 13 August 2017 at 10:12 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #650  
Old 13 August 2017, 12:34 PM
musicgeek's Avatar
musicgeek musicgeek is offline
 
Join Date: 01 August 2005
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 5,395
Default

So "tec" is British slang for private detective/private eye?
Reply With Quote
  #651  
Old 13 August 2017, 12:46 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 25,185
Default

In crosswords, yes. Pretty much nowhere else, I don't think, and it's not that common in crosswords...

I expect people have used it at times in the past.
Reply With Quote
  #652  
Old 13 August 2017, 01:45 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,856
Default

I've seen "tec" for "detective/private eye" outside the crossword context. Don't remember where; it's just part of my vocabulary, though not a part I'd ordinarily use. I may have read it in old detective stories.

I'm glad for some sort of explanation as to how such crosswords work. I only do simpler ones, and had glanced at some of the others but had no idea where to start. (Not sure I'm gonna start now, either.)

Last edited by thorny locust; 13 August 2017 at 01:46 PM. Reason: remove extraneous word. How did it get in there? -- good grief, two of them.
Reply With Quote
  #653  
Old 13 August 2017, 03:10 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 73,368
Default

The NYT standard (non-cryptic) crosswords use "tec" fairly often. It's one of those words I know because I do crosswords (and/or because my mom also did), like ort and ret, and the surname Alou (of MLB fame).

Unfortunately, I can't help Richard, I've never learned to do cryptic crosswords.
Reply With Quote
  #654  
Old 13 August 2017, 05:38 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 25,185
Default

I don't need help any more - on the second or third page of results I found a page explaining it! I was just having a mental block when I couldn't work it out even knowing the answer.
Reply With Quote
  #655  
Old 13 August 2017, 11:47 PM
ganzfeld's Avatar
ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
Join Date: 05 September 2005
Location: Kyoto, Japan
Posts: 23,007
Mister Ed

Recently I've encountered several different demonstrations of arts and crafts that use horse hair. Every time it's been a kind of fuzzy, wooly hair I've never seen on a horse, even though I have spent some time around horses. Is there a prehistoric wooly horse I'm not aware of or does this come from a wooly part of the horse I haven't seen or is there another explanation?
Reply With Quote
  #656  
Old 14 August 2017, 02:12 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
Join Date: 30 May 2008
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 998
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
Recently I've encountered several different demonstrations of arts and crafts that use horse hair. Every time it's been a kind of fuzzy, wooly hair I've never seen on a horse, even though I have spent some time around horses. Is there a prehistoric wooly horse I'm not aware of or does this come from a wooly part of the horse I haven't seen or is there another explanation?
Maybe winter hair? Our Shetland ponies lived outside and got very, very wooly in the winter. And mangy looking in the spring when they shed. The local birds loved it. Any bird's nest you would find had a lot of pony hair in it.
Reply With Quote
  #657  
Old 14 August 2017, 03:46 PM
ChasFink's Avatar
ChasFink ChasFink is offline
 
Join Date: 09 December 2015
Location: Mineola, NY
Posts: 358
Icon95

What exactly is the point of a Sleep Number bed? If we all have our own best number (as some of the ads imply) why not just get a regular mattress that matches that number? I can see its purpose in hotels, if you're a strange sort that wants your bed soft today and firm tomorrow, or if you're a VERY accommodating host furnishing your guest room, but for most of us - why?
Reply With Quote
  #658  
Old 14 August 2017, 03:55 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 73,368
Default

Two people sharing a bed can set their numbers independently. Most of the ads I see are clearly aimed at couples. I suppose if you have a king bed you could use two mattresses, but one mattress with two settings would be more convenient, I'd think.
Reply With Quote
  #659  
Old 14 August 2017, 04:44 PM
ChasFink's Avatar
ChasFink ChasFink is offline
 
Join Date: 09 December 2015
Location: Mineola, NY
Posts: 358
Icon05

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Two people sharing a bed can set their numbers independently. Most of the ads I see are clearly aimed at couples. I suppose if you have a king bed you could use two mattresses, but one mattress with two settings would be more convenient, I'd think.
I do see that. But the original marketing was not so couple-oriented, and ultimately, the same argument applies. One mattress that changes density in the middle can't be much more comfortable than two different mattresses side by side with a single cushioned top and sheet. Why invent a whole new thing with a primary difference that isn't necessary?
Reply With Quote
  #660  
Old 14 August 2017, 05:03 PM
chillas's Avatar
chillas chillas is offline
 
Join Date: 09 September 2002
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 11,744
Default

I have never found a conventional mattress that I found comfortable. My Select Comfort (precursor to the Sleep Number) is extremely comfortable.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stupid questions WildaBeast SLC 1005 03 February 2015 10:10 PM
Stupid questions MisterGrey SLC 1002 05 October 2014 06:25 AM
Stupid questions JoeBentley SLC 999 28 November 2013 10:52 PM
Stupid questions DawnStorm SLC 1002 25 July 2013 05:38 PM
Stupid questions Die Capacitrix SLC 1001 20 May 2013 06:11 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.