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  #1  
Old 05 February 2018, 01:38 AM
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Default Girl Scout sells more than 300 boxes of cookies at San Diego marijuana dispensary

https://www.10news.com/news/girl-sco...ana-dispensary

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SAN DIEGO (KGTV) - The legalization of California's marijuana industry and start of Girl Scout cookie sales have created an opportune moment for at least one San Diego girl.
Smart girl.
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  #2  
Old 05 February 2018, 02:10 AM
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I get why the organization doesn't want an official policy permitting the girls to set up shop outside a dispensary, but I really don't think it would put them at risk.
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  #3  
Old 05 February 2018, 01:33 PM
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Has the Girl Scout organization officially ended the door-to-door sales or is that just sort of faded away? Because I can't see that selling outside a business is any more risky that door-to-door sales, especially since they require a parent or guardian to be present.

PS. Why are the S'Mores cookies $1 more than the regular boxes? That just confuses things. Why didn't they just put less cookies in the box like they do with other cookies like Tagalogs?
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  #4  
Old 05 February 2018, 02:08 PM
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GSA has not ended door-to-door sales, subject to safety rules and guidelines.
(PDF warning), including:

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4. Partner with Adults: Adults must accompany Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors when they are taking orders, selling, or delivering product. Girls grades 6–12 must be supervised by an adult when selling door-to-door and must never sell alone. Adults should be present at a cookie booth in any public place at all times.
Since there'd be an adult present in either case, I don't see why selling outside a dispensary would be a risk. I can think of other reasons for the group to steer clear officially -- legal cannabis is still controversial, and although the girls are very unlikely to witness cannabis usage at a dispensary, many people would not understand that, or would still consider it inappropriate for them to be there.
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Old 05 February 2018, 02:18 PM
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I would expect setting up outside a liquor store to be frowned upon as well, even though alcohol is legal and not particularly risky to be outside the store. (It obviously would not have the same marketing possibilities, though.)
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  #6  
Old 05 February 2018, 02:27 PM
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What if one of the dispensary customers decides to leap out a third story window? The Girl Scout might be cut by broken glass or have a person land on them.

ETA: To erwins, it probably would be frowned upon, even though the Girl Scouts are outside of grocery stores which, in Arizona at least, can sell beer, wine, and spirituous liquors.
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  #7  
Old 05 February 2018, 03:48 PM
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I'm not sure that I would disagree, either. Setting up outside of any adult-only establishment seems inappropriate to me. I do agree that the kids would not be at risk of any particular harm, other than being exposed to the periphery of the adult-only activity.

ETA: GenYus, I think it is a bit different to set up outside a store that, among many other things, sells alcohol.

Last edited by erwins; 05 February 2018 at 03:57 PM.
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  #8  
Old 05 February 2018, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
ETA: GenYus, I think it is a bit different to set up outside a store that, among many other things, sells alcohol.
Are you saying that it is different to set up outside a grocery store vs a liquor store or grocery store vs marijuana dispensary?

If the former, a difference in how you see it or a difference in how many people would see it?

Finally, if the former again, what's the difference? If the outside of a store primary dedicated to buying liquor is more dangerous wouldn't there similar danger outside of a store where liquor is among the products that can be purchased?
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  #9  
Old 05 February 2018, 06:30 PM
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The first time I took my daughter into a liquor store, when she was 18, it was like a whole new world to her. Like she had stepped into the adult world. She never had that reaction to a grocery store. It is definitely different the way a bar is very different from a restaurant.

I don't have any statistics, but I was under the impression that both liquor stores have a statistically significant higher likelihood of an armed robbery.
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Old 05 February 2018, 06:53 PM
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According to this Australian study (pdf) gas stations (presumably that would include Kwik-E-Mart type locations as well) were the likeliest targets. Liquor stores least likely targets.

ETA: Based on that study, a Girl Scout cookie location outside a CVS is over 5 times as likely to be there when it is robbed than they would be outside a liquor store.
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  #11  
Old 05 February 2018, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
The first time I took my daughter into a liquor store, when she was 18, it was like a whole new world to her. Like she had stepped into the adult world. She never had that reaction to a grocery store. It is definitely different the way a bar is very different from a restaurant.
This is one of those things where my initial reaction is astonishment. I was going into liquor stores before I was in kindergarten. However, I realize not everywhere defines "liquor store" in the same way. When I was a kid, in Southern California at least, what we called a "liquor store" certainly sold liquor, but was also the closest thing to what we now would call a "convenience store." It's where you'd go if you wanted a candy bar, a pack of gum, a single can of soda, etc. We also bought comic books there, my Dad would stop there for bread or milk sometimes, and of course cigarettes were a huge part of their business.

While this role has mainly been supplanted by 7-11, AM/PM, and various smaller competitors (and the small stores now attached to many gas stations), there are still liquor stores of this kind around, and there's nothing to stop kids from going in them.

It wasn't until much later I realized that in some states, to buy alcohol -- or at least hard liquor -- you had to go to a special store that was adults-only and that didn't sell anything else (or not much of anything).

(Personally, I feel this is how tobacco ought to be sold, instead of at every grocery store, drugstore, convenience store, and gas station. At least we don't have the vending machines here any more....)-
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Old 05 February 2018, 10:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Finally, if the former again, what's the difference? If the outside of a store primary dedicated to buying liquor is more dangerous wouldn't there similar danger outside of a store where liquor is among the products that can be purchased?
No part of what I said was based on it being more dangerous. I made a statement about it being appropriate, based on it being an adult-only establishment. Grocery stores, even when they sell liquor, are not adult-only.
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Old 05 February 2018, 10:51 PM
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Not unless the produce department has gotten a lot more risque.
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  #14  
Old 05 February 2018, 11:53 PM
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Jolly Roger

Quote:
Originally Posted by E. Q. Taft View Post
...
It wasn't until much later I realized that in some states, to buy alcohol -- or at least hard liquor -- you had to go to a special store that was adults-only and that didn't sell anything else (or not much of anything)....
Michigan is not one of those states, we sell liquor in convenience stores, grocery stores, gas stations. But we still have liquor stores where alcohol is 90% or more of the product. There is a stark difference between the clientele of a convenience store and a liquor store which is most of what my daughter was noticing.
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  #15  
Old 06 February 2018, 01:52 AM
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I've never noticed a big difference in clientele.

I was going into liquor stores with my parents as long as I can recall. They would give kids suckers when you came in.

MN only has liquor stores (except 3.2 beer, but no one counts that), but the adults buying (real) beer and wine seemed to be the same people pumping their gas, buying gas station coffee, and going in to get a Slurpee at convenience stores.
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  #16  
Old 06 February 2018, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
No part of what I said was based on it being more dangerous. I made a statement about it being appropriate, based on it being an adult-only establishment. Grocery stores, even when they sell liquor, are not adult-only.
I don't understand what the the problem is with being outside the store.

Last edited by GenYus234; 06 February 2018 at 02:17 PM. Reason: original sounded confrontational
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  #17  
Old 06 February 2018, 04:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Not unless the produce department has gotten a lot more risque.
Well you may see the salad dressing.
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  #18  
Old 06 February 2018, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
Michigan is not one of those states, we sell liquor in convenience stores, grocery stores, gas stations. But we still have liquor stores where alcohol is 90% or more of the product. There is a stark difference between the clientele of a convenience store and a liquor store which is most of what my daughter was noticing.
Most of our convenience stores sell beer and wine, and maybe those pre-mixed type cocktails, but don't sell hard liquor. There are exceptions -- I know of one 7-11 that actually stocks hard liquor (by a strange coincidence it's the one right across from San Diego State...).

I don't know if there are actually still states where hard liquor is sold only in special stores -- I believe Oregon used to be that way, but I don't think it is now.

ETA: a few second's Googling tells me that there are eight states where liquor is sold only in government-run stores: Alabama, Idaho, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, and Washington.)
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Old 06 February 2018, 07:11 PM
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In Ohio, full-strength distilled liquor (as opposed to the diluted stuff sold in some grocery and convenience stores) can only be sold in dedicated liquor stores. Some supermarkets have liquor stores in the same building, but in an enclosed area with its own registers, where you have to pay for your liquor.

But even when it was all "state stores," it wasn't all that unusual to see parents in them with their kids. It's a chore, like going to the dry cleaners -- sometimes you need to do it with the kids in tow.
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  #20  
Old 06 February 2018, 09:31 PM
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Unless it has changed since I lived there, Florida is like Lainie describes. Liquor is sold in dedicated liquor stores. Some of those may be connected to a grocery store, but they have separate entrances (like, you have to go outside to get from one to the other) and separate registers, etc. It's a separate store that may share the name and some walls. (Florida also has beverage barn drive through liquor stores, though, lest you think buying liquor there would be inconvenient.)

ETA:. By my count, there are 18 - 20 (depending on whether you count states where it's allowed in some localities) states where you can buy full strength distilled spirits in the aisles of grocery stores.

So it looks like dedicated liquor stores are still the majority rule.

Last edited by erwins; 06 February 2018 at 09:43 PM.
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