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  #21  
Old 01 November 2017, 12:26 PM
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Well Silver Spring MD was named for the small body of water that one of Robert E. Lee's ancestors/descendants (I forget which) saw when he visited the area. The supposed spot is actually marked with a flowing water sculpture. The part of Silver Spring I live in, Wheaton, was named for its founder.

In another part of the county, there is the City of Gaithersburg. It has a section called Washington Grove that features fine old houses on tree lined streets. My mother told me that the section got its name from the Washingtonians who would spend summers up there, a trip from DC to Gaithersburg being a major road trip/vacation way back when. These days a trip from DC to Gaithersburg is just a traffic filled slog on MD355.

Dawn--my little town-Storm
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  #22  
Old 01 November 2017, 01:15 PM
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The former independent city Altona, now (since 1937) a borough of Hamburg, according to legend got it's name like this:

Some people wanted to found a new town near Hamburg. The merchant citizens of Hamburg, fearing the competition, wanted it to be founded as far from Hamburg as possible. It was agreed that a boy should be blindfolded and sent running from the city's wall. Where he fell down, that should be the place for the new foundation. The boy, being afraid of falling into a trench, did run a short distance and then threw himself to the ground. The Hamburg merchants, seeing the short distance, cried out (in the Hamburg dialect): "Dat is all to nah an Hamburg ran!" ("That is all to close to Hamburg"). Thus, Al-to-na was named.

Another explanation is that there first was a roadside tavern that the coachmen of that time deemed "all to nah" to Hamburg, meaning not far enough down the road to merit a first stop when you had started travelling from Hamburg.

In reality, the town was probably named after a small brook in the area, called Aldenawe or Altenau on old maps.


Apparently, Altoona, Pennsylvania, may be named after the German (then Danish) Altona.
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  #23  
Old 01 November 2017, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Enrico View Post
Apparently, Altoona, Pennsylvania, may be named after the German (then Danish) Altona.
Altona, Manitoba is likely named for Altona near Hamburg. This is in the region of the population that is known as Mennonite country. Lots of a German dialect spoken there.
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  #24  
Old 01 November 2017, 01:44 PM
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Altona under Danish rule in the 17th century was much more welcoming to different faiths than Hamburg. There still is a big Jewish cemetary there, and there were churches for the Dutch reformed, the Huguenots and, yes, Mennonites. The Mennonites still have a church there (German Wikipedia).
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  #25  
Old 01 November 2017, 01:57 PM
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In Ipswich there's a Coprolite Street near the docks, which was named because one of the exports from the docks used to be fertilizer made from coprolites. (Apparently a local man had the patent on the extraction process). That's not really a legend though, as it's unambiguously true...

There's a Peascod Street in Windsor. When I saw it I assumed it was a corruption of "Please God Street", since I think "peascod" was used at one time as a substitute exclamation to avoid blasphemy. But apparently it derives from "pes croft" because at one time peas were actually grown there. Also it's apparently pronounced "pesscot" rather than the phonetic pronunciation you'd expect.
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  #26  
Old 01 November 2017, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Also it's apparently pronounced "pesscot" rather than the phonetic pronunciation you'd expect.
Which I'm pretty sure is true of every place name in Britain.
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  #27  
Old 01 November 2017, 02:40 PM
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Yes, it does get a bit confusing.

"How do you get to Pesscot?"
"Sorry, is that the Pesscot spelled 'W-o-r-c-e-s-t-e-r' or 'L-e-i-c-e-s-t-e-r'?"
"Ah, no, I meant the 'G-l-a-m-i-s' Pesscot."
"Well, I wouldn't start from here..."
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  #28  
Old 01 November 2017, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
In Ipswich there's a Coprolite Street near the docks, which was named because one of the exports from the docks used to be fertilizer made from coprolites. (Apparently a local man had the patent on the extraction process).

So it's literally possible to be up S creek without a paddle?
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  #29  
Old 01 November 2017, 07:17 PM
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Up S street, anyway.



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  #30  
Old 01 November 2017, 09:16 PM
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I just watched an old episode of Jacques Cousteau's TV series from the 1960s and 70s, which took place around Nouméa in New Caledonia. (It was about the environmental impact of the runoff and discharge from strip mining on the sea bed - despite the much more spectacular camera work in things like The Blue Planet 2, modern nature documentaries seldom show human impact in the way that this series routinely did. It's as though it wasn't considered political to show this stuff back then, but it is now, or something.)

Anyway, it led me to look at the map of Nouméa on Google Earth, and I noticed districts named things like "Receiving" and "Motor Pool". (The link should show them on Maps rather than Earth.)

Apparently these names date from its US military occupation during World War II:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noum%C3%A9a#History

I can imagine people coming to different conclusions, though. If I'd not looked it up, I'd have wondered if they were from the mining corporations themselves, since it seems the city formed around mining operations.
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  #31  
Old 02 November 2017, 11:48 AM
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I've talked to people who have been to Atlanta and they tell me that every street name has the word peach in it. Can Atlanta Snopesters verify this?
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  #32  
Old 02 November 2017, 12:19 PM
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Google Maps doesn't agree.

Although on closer look, there are Peachtree Street, Peachtree Road, Peachtree Circle and West Peachtree Street

Last edited by Don Enrico; 02 November 2017 at 12:25 PM. Reason: Peachtree
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  #33  
Old 02 November 2017, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I've talked to people who have been to Atlanta and they tell me that every street name has the word peach in it. Can Atlanta Snopesters verify this?
Only 71 called Peachtree. Sounds like a nightmare.
Quote:
According to historians (OK, Wikipedia), Peachtree was named for a Creek settlement called Standing Pitch Tree. Supposedly, the Creek used the pitch, or sap, from pine trees in its ceremonies. “Pitch tree” didn’t sound right to European settlers, so they called it “peach tree.”
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  #34  
Old 02 November 2017, 11:31 PM
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Ware. Silly name. Leads to much confusion. It is fairly certain that it come the word 'weir', but no-one can prove it. There are plenty of places in the UK with 'ware' in their name and all can point to that part of its name coming from 'weir'. For example there is Wareham meaning a village, or hamlet, next to a weir.

Ware is unusual in that nothing has been added to its name. The best evidence for its origin comes from an entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for 895 when Alfred the Great built weirs 'on the Lea twenty miles north of London'. The only town from that time that fits that description is Ware - or Hertford as it was then known. Alfred built the weir, by the way, to strand the Viking longships.

The area now occupied by the town has been inhabited since at least 4,000BC and there was a sizeable Roman settlement here. What the Roman town was called no-one knows - or indeed what the town was called before that.
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  #35  
Old 03 November 2017, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware View Post
Alfred the Great built weirs 'on the Lea twenty miles north of London'.
So really it should now be called Warily

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  #36  
Old 05 November 2017, 07:13 PM
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I collect photos of funny street/place names, so this is right up my amusingly named alley!

A place nearish to be is called None-Go-Bye. I was always curious about this until I read a book of Yorkshire legends which said the name originated with a sign for an inn, which proclaimed:
'None go by dry
If you do
The fault's with you
And not with I'

Which doesn't explain the spelling, mind you.
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