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  #621  
Old 07 February 2018, 02:09 PM
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I over thought myself on the Commonwealths question. If I'd gone with my first impulse, I'd've gotten it right. Usually, I do go with my first impulse. I'm sad I talked myself out of it this time.

As for question seven, the "and no others" is the sticking point for me. I can think of a number of maybe answers, but then always think of another country to which it applies.

Seaboe
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  #622  
Old 07 February 2018, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UEL View Post
7. I've got physicists on the brain from that Vienna question. All I can think of is that it had to do with radiation accidents.
Don't think that is it, the order is wrong. The Three Mile Island incident was be before Chernobyl so US, Russia, Japan would have to be in that order (or Japan, Russia, US if reversed). It might be ordered by number of fatalities, but I'm not sure Chernobyl or Pripryat (sp?) are in Russia proper, I think they are in the Ukraine.
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  #623  
Old 07 February 2018, 02:28 PM
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Also, again, it wouldn't be an exhaustive list. The UK would be in it for the fire at Windscale in 1957:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windscale_fire

(And apparently plenty of minor leaks as well). I would have thought it would be quite hard to find a definitive list of nuclear accidents, too, although maybe easier than to find a definitive list of countries that have been "reunited" with other bits of the country. (Unless there's a very specific definition involved).

Beside which, as GenYus said, Chernobyl is in Ukraine not Russia. (eta - to be fair I'm not sure exactly where it is; I don't think it's in the Crimea but it may be in the other slice of Ukraine that Russia has just annexed. But if India qualifies as a "sort of", surely that would too. It was in the USSR at the time of the disaster.) And again, Cyprus first? Are there any nuclear reactors (or other major sources of "leakable" radioactivity) in Cyprus?
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  #624  
Old 07 February 2018, 02:33 PM
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I had physics stuck on my brain, and I know that there were nuclear incidents in many of those countries. But I knew that it was a broad shot in the dark.

As for USSR vs Russia vs Ukraine, I was betting on it being an oversight.

As for Cyprus, I was hoping that there was an incident that I was not aware of.

I'll admit my guess is in all likelihood wrong.
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  #625  
Old 07 February 2018, 02:36 PM
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I just realised I almost cheated by looking up the details of the Windscale leak, but I wanted to include a link in case you'd not heard of it! I wouldn't have known the exact year without having looked at Wikipedia. And since I think it's a red herring it's not completely disallowed.
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  #626  
Old 13 February 2018, 11:07 AM
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Valentine's Eve and time for Tuesday Trivia.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. Tennis phenom Hyeon Chung of South Korea has joined Janko Tipsarevic and Denis Istomin as the only players on the ATP tour ro share what immediately obvious characteristic?
They wear glasses on the court. Very stylish ones, in Chung's case.

2. What Vienna-born physicist won a 1945 Nobel Prize for "his discovery of a new law of Nature, the exclusion principle"?
The exclusion principle, which states that no two electrons in an atom can occupy the same quantum state, is named for Wolfgang Pauli.

3. In medieval Japan, a wakizashi was the smaller companion to what type of sword?
Wakizashis are short; katanas are long. Conversations with people who like to talk about wakizashis and katanas seem long.

4. On March 27, 1977, the island of Tenerife was the site of the worst disaster of what kind in history?
It was the deadliest accident in aviation history. Two planes collided on a runway at Tenerife Airport, killing almost 600 people.

5. I Put a Spell on Me was a 2001 documentary about what one-of-a-kind R&B legend?
The amazing Screamin' Jay Hawkins had his biggest hit with 1956's "I Put a Spell on You."

6. Four U.S. states are officially "commonwealths." What's the only U.S. state that borders three of the four commonwealths?
The four commonwealths are Massachusetts, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and West Virginia borders the last three of the four.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these countries in this order, and no others? Cyprus, Russia, India (sort of), Germany, France, Poland, France, the United States, Japan.
These are all the countries that have chemical elements on the periodic table named in their honor, from copper (known to the ancients) to nihonium (only named a couple years ago). The "sort of" for India is because indium isn't named directly for the nation. It's name for indigo, which was in turn named for India.


THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What two European nations with a shared 1,000-mile border also shared a monarchy between 1814 and 1905 as the "United Kingdoms"?

2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name?

3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre?

4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet?

5. What tourist attraction, which opened April 12, 1992, did French theater director Ariane Mnouchkine famously call a "cultural Chernobyl"?

6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these children's books? The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Hobbit, How to Train Your Dragon, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tik-Tok of Oz, Watership Down, The Wind in the Willows, Winnie-the-Poo

Enjoy.
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  #627  
Old 13 February 2018, 11:32 AM
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1. Hmm, 1000 miles seems longer than most of the borders I can think of between possible candidates. Aha, it must be Norway and Sweden.

2. N for Knight.

3. I don't know which, but either Gilbert or Sullivan. I think it was Sullivan.

4. Dog?

5. "Eurodisney" / Disneyland Paris, I should think.

6. It must be the belt because one of the "stars" in the sword is a nebula.

Quote:
7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these children's books? The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Hobbit, How to Train Your Dragon, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tik-Tok of Oz, Watership Down, The Wind in the Willows, Winnie-the-Poo
"Winnie-the-Poo"? Is that a cut-and-paste error on DadOf3's part?

I should be able to get this one as I've read most of them. (Watership Down isn't a children's book though). But I haven't thought of it yet... Anthropomorphic animals is one thing that a lot of them have in common, but that doesn't seem unusual in a children's book, and I don't think it applies to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. (Or The Hobbit, unless you count Beorn, which I suppose you could).

I wonder if they've all appeared at the top of adult best-seller lists?
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  #628  
Old 13 February 2018, 11:50 AM
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1. What two European nations with a shared 1,000-mile border also shared a monarchy between 1814 and 1905 as the "United Kingdoms"?

Norway and Sweden,
but I have never heard the term "United Kingdoms"


4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet?

Dog?

6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion?

The belt
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  #629  
Old 13 February 2018, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post

"Winnie-the-Poo"? Is that a cut-and-paste error on DadOf3's part?
Whoops. Sorry about that. Yes, Ken Jennings did correctly spell Winnie-the-Pooh's name. My mistake.
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  #630  
Old 13 February 2018, 12:15 PM
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7. They all feature the main characters riding a dragon who tranports them through the center of the earth to the other side in a metal tube.
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  #631  
Old 13 February 2018, 12:34 PM
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Not true, kitap. In Winnie-the-Pooh the tube is wooden.

Actually, I think the answer to 7 is that they all have maps.
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  #632  
Old 13 February 2018, 12:40 PM
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1. Sweden and Norway.

2. Knight.

3. From the timing, guessing Gilbert & Sullivan.

4. Cat.

5. Eurodisney.

6. Belt.

7. No answer, but some thoughts: I think all (or almost) have been popular with adults as well, though if it were something along those lines you'd expect Harry Potter to be there in that case. I believe all include animals that are anthropomorphic to some degree, but that's certainly not that unusual.
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  #633  
Old 13 February 2018, 12:41 PM
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2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name? Knight?

3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre? Gilbert & Sullivan?

4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet? Cat?

5. What tourist attraction, which opened April 12, 1992, did French theater director Ariane Mnouchkine famously call a "cultural Chernobyl"? Eurodisney?

6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion? The belt?"

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these children's books? The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Hobbit, How to Train Your Dragon, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tik-Tok of Oz, Watership Down, The Wind in the Willows, Winnie-the-Pooh Hmmm... I feel like I should know this. WAG - A character counts things/does math to calm down?

100% guesses for me this week, although they mostly seem plausible.
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  #634  
Old 13 February 2018, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Not true, kitap. In Winnie-the-Pooh the tube is wooden.

Actually, I think the answer to 7 is that they all have maps.
The other Oz books didn't? I admit I've read reprints and they all did so I'm no help when it comes to the originals.
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  #635  
Old 13 February 2018, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Actually, I think the answer to 7 is ...
Yes, I think you're right, although I wouldn't have said that was very unusual.

I'd forgotten Watership Down matched that answer, but I looked at my copy and you're right. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime is a bit different from the others, though - the others all have a map at the front showing the area where they're set (at least, the ones I know do, which is all of them except the Oz one, and How To Train Your Dragon). TCIOTDITN has lots of little maps and plans and diagrams all the way through it, showing whatever the narrator is looking at or thinking about at the time.
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  #636  
Old 13 February 2018, 01:48 PM
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Now I know I'm sick--I can't work up the energy to answer this week's questions. Sorry.

Seaboe
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  #637  
Old 13 February 2018, 03:18 PM
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For #7, could it be that drawings or writings by the characters are interspersed with the text?
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  #638  
Old 13 February 2018, 05:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
For #7, could it be that ....?
Then I would have expected Le Petit Prince de Saint-Exupery in that list
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  #639  
Old 13 February 2018, 05:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post
Then I would have expected Le Petit Prince de Saint-Exupery in that list
Good call. I just feel like maps is awfully generic, especially in children's/young adult fantasy.
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  #640  
Old 13 February 2018, 07:28 PM
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is #7 All illustrated by the Author?
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