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  #41  
Old 09 June 2014, 10:56 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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I don't get that. What do you mean "difficult to follow"? Are you saying there's a hurricane about to touch down on land in the next few days and they think someone says "Hurricane A" instead of "Hurricane B" so they get confused about which letter is about to hit them and that makes some kind of difference? It's difficult for me to believe that would ever make any difference to even one in ten million people. (Probably comparable to those who get confused by "is it Amber or Ambrose??" to the point that they don't prepare.) It's not like letters for people you know; There's only one A per year.
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  #42  
Old 09 June 2014, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
I don't get that. What do you mean "difficult to follow"? Are you saying there's a hurricane about to touch down on land in the next few days and they think someone says "Hurricane A" instead of "Hurricane B" so they get confused about which letter is about to hit them and that makes some kind of difference? It's difficult for me to believe that would ever make any difference to even one in ten million people. (Probably comparable to those who get confused by "is it Amber or Ambrose??" to the point that they don't prepare.) It's not like letters for people you know; There's only one A per year.
We can get several tropical storms at once in the Caribbean/Atlantic. My guess is a name is easier to keep track of even vaguely than a number. Susan is heading towards Haiti but Rose is heading towards Galveston is more memorable than 18 is headed to Galveston and 19 to Haiti is my guess.
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  #43  
Old 09 June 2014, 11:19 AM
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We live next to the most active tropical storm area on the planet - way more active than the Caribbean/Atlantic. I've never heard of anyone having any such problem. It's hard to imagine someone going "What? The typhoon is here? Gee I forgot which one was on the way so I didn't evacuate!"
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  #44  
Old 09 June 2014, 02:58 PM
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Deleted - not as interested as I thought.

Last edited by Sue; 09 June 2014 at 03:06 PM.
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  #45  
Old 14 June 2014, 05:40 PM
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Simply Madeline Simply Madeline is offline
 
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Default Do Female-Named Hurricanes Need To Lean In?

http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2...ed-to-lean-in?

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We were alarmed to learn yesterday that hurricanes with female names are not being taken as seriously as their male counterparts. It seems people in the path of a hurricane are more likely to heed warnings to take shelter or evacuate if the storm is named Charley than if the storm is named Eloise. Which can be a deadly decision. [Because, seriously: Hurricanes are dangerous ó even if they have "lady" names. If authorities tell you to take shelter or evacuate, do it. Right away.]

That said, with female hurricanes now making up 50 percent of the cyclone workforce and advice for women on doing things better making up at least 50 percent of the Internet*, we're also worried about what this trend means for the career advancement of female storms. We've seen this before. We know where this is going. So to get ahead of the curve, we'd like to offer some advice to all the girls out there hoping to become fearsome natural disasters when they grow up.

1. Stop acting so "blustery": What's with all these gale-force winds? Why are you blowing things out of proportion? We know the hurricane season is in touch with the phases of the moon, if you know what we are saying, but for heaven's sake, keep it together.
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  #46  
Old 24 February 2018, 04:22 PM
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Default Revision: Female-named hurricanes are most likely not deadlier than male hurricanes

Three years ago, a scientific study claimed that storms named Debby are predisposed to kill more people than storms named Don. The study alleged that people donít take female-named storms as seriously. Numerous analyses have since found that this conclusion has little merit.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.7cf91b8b6d88
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  #47  
Old 26 February 2018, 12:57 PM
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I know one thing: if there is ever a hurricane named Dawn, I will never hear the end of it. I did check the National Hurricane Center's website about a year ago and nope, no Dawns listed. None in the past, none in the future. Of course if there ever is a Hurricane DH's name, he would never hear the end of it. Given that DH has a much-used name, I'm surprised that I did not see it on the NHC's site.
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  #48  
Old 26 February 2018, 01:18 PM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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Shamelessly edited: I was going to say there's never been a Don or a Debby but there have been at least three Debbys. Maybe there's been a Don too.

Last edited by ganzfeld; 26 February 2018 at 01:32 PM.
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  #49  
Old 28 February 2018, 11:15 AM
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The Met Office in the UK started naming storms in 2015 - so after this thread was first created. I still find it somewhat annoying.

Anyway, there's a discussion in the article below about their reasons for doing so, and the changes in language in weather forecasts and stories in general, and it seems pretty up-front that it was all to do with creating rolling news drama and ratings interest. To be fair, some of the terms (such as "weather bomb") are apparently sensationalised synonyms for actual, properly-defined meteorological terms ("rapid cyclogenesis" in this case) but there doesn't seem much reason for introducing them to the forecasts like that when they're not going to mean anything to most people.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-43211216

Quote:
Which brings things neatly back to the "Beast from the East" and Admiral Robert Fitzroy.

What would he make of the weather being described in such a way?

"I think he'd be rather disappointed," says Peter.

"It doesn't really convey any useful information - other than there's a really good story and it's something to be scared of.

"That's what Fitzroy was trying to get away from. He wanted to show things in clear, simple words while sticking to the facts.

"Now, it's the opposite."
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  #50  
Old 03 March 2018, 01:09 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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... The name certainly made me treat this weather pattern less seriously, anyway. It's been very cold but until yesterday there'd not even been much snow settling where I live, or in pictures I'd seen, and even now I've seen heavier snow at least twice in the eight winters I've lived here.

Apparently, though, it's the worst for a long time and there have been at least 10 weather-related deaths:

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...her-batters-uk

I'd overlooked that the Beast from the East had collided with "Storm Emma".

I don't know how those ten weather-related deaths compare with other years; they seem to be deaths through accidents rather than through cold. Cold would be a better measure. And regardless of snow and dramatic pictures, it's been unusually cold in the last week. So I can believe that this cold spell might be more extreme than in the past.

But that's not because of the name - and to me, the name makes me take it all as media hype, and think that the actual stories are being sought out and pushed forward to live up to the name!

The real story is about the unusual warmth of the Arctic, and that has been getting through as well.
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  #51  
Old 03 March 2018, 08:45 AM
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Die Capacitrix Die Capacitrix is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
.I'd overlooked that the Beast from the East had collided with "Storm Emma".
The cold front on Monday was called Hartmut in Germany. I find the whole thing rather confusing.
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