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  #441  
Old 23 June 2016, 09:27 PM
Steve Steve is offline
 
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TallgeekyGirl,

During the French Revolution.
Quote:
The terms "left" and "right" appeared during the French Revolution of 1789 when members of the National Assembly divided into supporters of the king to the president's right and supporters of the revolution to his left. One deputy, the Baron de Gauville, explained, "We began to recognize each other: those who were loyal to religion and the king took up positions to the right of the chair so as to avoid the shouts, oaths, and indecencies that enjoyed free rein in the opposing camp." However, the Right opposed the seating arrangement because they believed that deputies should support private or general interests but should not form factions or political parties. The contemporary press occasionally used the terms "left" and "right" to refer to the opposing sides.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left%E...right_politics
  #442  
Old 23 June 2016, 09:28 PM
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They are supposed to have from from pre-Revolutionary France where the conservative members sat to the right of the King and the liberal members to the left.

ETA: For awhile, it looked like "red state" vs "blue state" or at least "red vs blue" might take on a life like this, but they appear to be used less.
  #443  
Old 24 June 2016, 01:40 AM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
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Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
If they're residents of the UK, why is it so strange that they get a vote? residents who are not citizens get to vote in certain elections in lots of countries. Why shouldn't they?
Other residents of the UK, who are NOT from Commonwealth countries, don't get to vote, just the non-citizens that I mentioned. I was wondering why someone from a Commonwealth country could, since they are not citizens.
  #444  
Old 24 June 2016, 02:15 AM
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WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
They are supposed to have from from pre-Revolutionary France where the conservative members sat to the right of the King and the liberal members to the left.

ETA: For awhile, it looked like "red state" vs "blue state" or at least "red vs blue" might take on a life like this, but they appear to be used less.
Well I learned something today. I always assumed it referred to the seating chart in the House and Senate.
  #445  
Old 24 June 2016, 02:30 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfresh View Post
Other residents of the UK, who are NOT from Commonwealth countries, don't get to vote, just the non-citizens that I mentioned. I was wondering why someone from a Commonwealth country could, since they are not citizens.
It depends what's on the ballot. Non-citizen residents with EU citizenship get to vote in many elections in the UK, too. So partly it's a matter of giving voting rights to non-citizen residents. (I don't see why it should be only citizens. If someone has lived in a place their whole life, for example, why should it matter what it says on their passport?) But another part is an attempt not to disenfranchise voters because of historical changes (including some that those residents may have had no say in). So someone might have had the right previously and I think the idea is that they should not lose the right because, for example, their home country's status has changed. (ETA - Another part of this is reciprocity. For example, Malta and the UK reciprocate, I think.)

Somebody from the UK can probably explain this better but I'm just saying I don't see why the default should be "citizens only". I rather like the UK's way. It's hardly the only country that allows non-citizen residents to vote. Good for them.

Last edited by ganzfeld; 24 June 2016 at 02:39 AM.
  #446  
Old 24 June 2016, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinecone View Post
Usually there are exit polls, but apparently not for this, as an earnest but excited chap on the telly just told me.
There have been no exit polls for the Brexit voting, because for an exit poll to be relevant, you have to compare it to last election's polls and results. Since the last vote on the EU in the UK took place 40 years ago under much different circumstances, there would have been nothing to compare today's (well, yesterday's) polls to.

At the moment, most of the polling places have been counted, and the "Out" vote is leading by about 1 million votes.

Good buy, United Kingdom. Welcome back, independent Scotland in 2027!
  #447  
Old 24 June 2016, 12:45 PM
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I had to call 911 this morning because of an accident at my corner. As accidents go, this one was pretty minor, but the 911 dispatcher sure had a lot of questions such as...

Make/model of the vehicles (is that to determine what type of tow truck is needed? I was asked if one was needed and I said yes.)

Were drugs/alcohol involved? (how would I know? I told you I'm not part of it! I guess that's to alert paramedics, but thankfully no one was hurt so they were not needed.)

I also had to give the dispatcher my name/number but I imagine that that was just in case he needed to call back. But....maybe people have called in false alarms and a name/number is a way to trace the caller.

I felt like I was ordering a pizza!

Dawn--Dispatcher: hey Officer Friendly! Wanna take this accident at Dawn's Corner?--Storm
  #448  
Old 24 June 2016, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I had to call 911 this morning because of an accident at my corner. As accidents go, this one was pretty minor, but the 911 dispatcher sure had a lot of questions such as...

Make/model of the vehicles (is that to determine what type of tow truck is needed? I was asked if one was needed and I said yes.)

Were drugs/alcohol involved? (how would I know? I told you I'm not part of it! I guess that's to alert paramedics, but thankfully no one was hurt so they were not needed.)

I also had to give the dispatcher my name/number but I imagine that that was just in case he needed to call back. But....maybe people have called in false alarms and a name/number is a way to trace the caller.

I felt like I was ordering a pizza!

Dawn--Dispatcher: hey Officer Friendly! Wanna take this accident at Dawn's Corner?--Storm
Drugs/alcohol could be useful to responding units but might be to see if a police unit is needed. Cops around here often don't respond to most minor accidents unless they block traffic.

call back number is in case more info is needed by the responding units. It's a routine question but usually in case responding units need more info and/or can not locate the incident. Around here it is mainly used during smoke investigation calls.

Make/model could also be used in the event one of the vehicles flees the scene but guessing most often used for tow truck.

Last edited by firefighter_raven; 24 June 2016 at 01:09 PM.
  #449  
Old 24 June 2016, 01:12 PM
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Police

Thanks for the info Raven! To my knowledge, many insurance companies will not honor an accident claim unless there is a police report, so the police are normally called even for really minor fender benders.
  #450  
Old 24 June 2016, 01:18 PM
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You can go to the police station and file a report. I had to do that once because the accident happened on private property. I'm sure you could do the same thing if the cops just weren't able to respond. Here, in bad winter weather, they may respond only to injury accidents.
  #451  
Old 24 June 2016, 02:07 PM
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When I went to file a report on an accident that happened on private property, the police said that they don't do reports on private property accidents since traffic laws don't apply there.
  #452  
Old 24 June 2016, 02:50 PM
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Hmm. It's been a long time ago, but my recollection is that I had to file something official for insurance reasons.
  #453  
Old 24 June 2016, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
Thanks for the info Raven! To my knowledge, many insurance companies will not honor an accident claim unless there is a police report, so the police are normally called even for really minor fender benders.
I've filed two auto insurance claims this year already...but this is here in Canada, specifically Ottawa, Ontario...

Police will no longer file a police report for an accident whose damage is less than $2000. If you want a police report, the damage must either be obviously over 2K or you must get an appraisal done. Also, the police will not do a report more than 24 hours after the accident (good luck getting an appraisal on the weekend) and will scold you if you did not call for them to tell you all of this in the first place.

Insurance companies here are aware of this practice and no longer require police reports in cases where both sides agree on the facts, such as during a fender bender in a parking lot, where there was an exchange of insurance information or when a neighbour backs into your car that was parked on the street, despite being high on a snowbank.
  #454  
Old 24 June 2016, 03:14 PM
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A few years ago I had the occasion to call 911 due to a break-in in progress at my next door neighbors house. I was surprised at how many questions they asked and how unprepared I was to answer them. I guess I just figured I'd say "OMG, someone is breaking in next door!11" and they'd send all the police cars.
  #455  
Old 24 June 2016, 03:53 PM
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The last time I called 911 I got a "all our operators are busy right now, but please hold on the line as your call is important to us".

My brother in law thought I was joking.

I was calling about his father unresponsive on the floor so, yeah, that would make a great joke. It was less than a minute before they answered, but still.
  #456  
Old 24 June 2016, 04:39 PM
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I was in a car crash a couple of months ago, and the other vehicle did flee, which shows that getting the info from anyone who might have it as far as make/model/plate #, and any information you might have about alcohol would be important up front. If you'd observed that a person seemed to be staggering around like they were drunk, and then they took off driving again, it would change the priority of the call, and potentially provide a basis for stopping and investigating and/or arresting the person.

I knew from a previous hit and run that for my insurance to treat it as an uninsured motorist claim rather than a claim against my collision coverage, I needed a police report to be filed so that the police would be theoretically trying to find the person who caused the accident.

I forgot, however, to file a report with the DMV. That is, until they sent me a notice that if I didn't file one by a certain date, my license would be suspended. It isn't enough here to file a police report--the DMV collects a bunch of information, so you have to fill out their report too if the accident qualifies as reportable. Mine did because someone was injured, and because the damage was over the dollar amount/my car was totalled.
  #457  
Old 28 June 2016, 05:17 PM
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British politics doesn't really get a lot of news coverage in the US unless it's something that has international repercussions. So can UK snopesters explain, why was the UK even having a referendum on whether or not it should stay in the EU in the first place? I mean it obviously didn't come out of nowhere. What exactly led up to it?
  #458  
Old 28 June 2016, 05:44 PM
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I've seen plenty of coverage of Brexit.
  #459  
Old 28 June 2016, 05:48 PM
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I didn't see much coverage until the last few weeks, which makes sense, we've got enough other stuff to focus on here in Ottawa, like sinkholes and the like. Now the coverage is exhaustive, also understandable.

To answer your question Wildabeast I believe that holding a referendum was a campaign promise made by David Cameron and that he felt obliged to follow through on it. Now just why he felt that he needed to actually honour that particular campaign promise I'm not sure about.

ETA:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/22/wo...nion.html?_r=0
  #460  
Old 28 June 2016, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
I've seen plenty of coverage of Brexit.
That's not what I meant. I've seen plenty of coverage of Brexit as well. What I'm asking about is what happened before Brexit. What was the political mood in the UK that got them to the point where Brexit was even an idea?

ETA: Ah, the NY Times article helps some. That's kind of what I was getting at -- Why did David Cameron promise a referendum on Brexit in the first place? Why did he think that would help him politically?

Last edited by WildaBeast; 28 June 2016 at 05:57 PM.
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