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Old 28 June 2013, 03:58 AM
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Judge The Brouhaha Behind 'Argle Bargle': A Linguistic Explanation

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia invoked a curious term in his fierce dissent of Wednesday's ruling that struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, calling it a "legalistic argle-bargle," which sounds like a made up word if we've ever heard one, but was actually a carefully chosen phrase of disgust.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/natio...anation/66630/
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  #2  
Old 28 June 2013, 04:47 AM
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I'm mostly familiar with the variation "harglebargle," which is used as an example of being so angry that you can't make proper words anymore.
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Old 28 June 2013, 04:57 AM
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Argle-bargle or foofaraw?

[/Kent Brockman]
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Old 28 June 2013, 01:58 PM
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"Argle bargle" was part of a string of stoned gibberish in the Tolkien parody Bored of the Rings.
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Old 28 June 2013, 02:17 PM
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I've seen it both as argy-bargy and argle-bargle. From context I gathered it meant kerfluffle, hubbub, bobbery, corroboree, jimjams, ruction, williwaw, or splore. Or at least that it fell in that general family of words.
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Old 28 June 2013, 03:04 PM
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"Argy-bargy" at least in the UK, is less a fuss than an argument--a heated one, perhaps with pushing and shoving. "There was a bit of argy-bargy outside the pub last night."
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Old 29 June 2013, 05:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloe View Post
"Argy-bargy" at least in the UK, is less a fuss than an argument--a heated one, perhaps with pushing and shoving. "There was a bit of argy-bargy outside the pub last night."
Same here in Australia, though a bit more on the pysical side. Closer to a phyisical fight then a heated argument.
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Old 30 June 2013, 09:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
"Argle bargle" was part of a string of stoned gibberish in the Tolkien parody Bored of the Rings.
Specifically, IIRC, in the preface, where it refers to the Boggies being given the right to dwell in the Sty by the King at Ribroast, with a footnote identifying the king as "Either Arglebargle IV or someone else."
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Old 30 June 2013, 09:20 PM
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No, I was thinking of another part, where a character is stoned and says "argle bargle morgle woosh."
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Old 01 July 2013, 06:31 AM
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Quote:
Indeed, rather than reaching for the very American "mumbo-jumbo," Scalia went for an overseas variant.
[NITPICK] That isn't a variant any more than "pop" is a variant of "screech." The words are in the same category, but have different histories and meanings. One is a discussion/dispute between parties, the other is just big, empty words. I suspect the judge wasn't just being "exotic," but actually understood the difference. [/NITPICK]

Last edited by Little Pink Pill; 01 July 2013 at 06:45 AM.
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Old 01 July 2013, 12:59 PM
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I'm more surprised that mumbo-jumbo would be fine as an alternative, since it's meant to make you think of witch doctors etc - like nonsense words used for a silly superstition that no civilised person believes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumbo_jumbo_(phrase)
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Old 01 July 2013, 04:58 PM
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It can have that connotation, which is another reason why it wouldn't be fine as an alternative. It isn't an American/British correlation the way "hood" and "bonnet" are.
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Old 01 July 2013, 06:16 PM
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Ah. The article gave me the impression that no-one would have thought anything of him saying mumbo-jumbo, as if it were the expected term.
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Old 01 July 2013, 06:24 PM
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He could have easily said Mumbo-Jumbo, except that he likes to show off his vocabulary while he's being insulting. They don't have the same meaning, but the point is he was going for something nasty to say about the other side. A very common tactic of his.
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Old 02 July 2013, 01:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
No, I was thinking of another part, where a character is stoned and says "argle bargle morgle woosh."
Ah yes, I think you're right, in the Tim Benzedrene chapter.
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  #16  
Old 04 July 2013, 08:19 PM
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Is "argle bargle" pronounced with a hard or soft "g"? It made me think of "arga warga" which is

Quote:
The sound of being gobbled up by two mythological dogs, Folleree and Folleroo, from Russell Hoban's excellent "Riddley Walker."
http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...erm=arga+warga
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