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  #41  
Old 09 September 2017, 08:55 AM
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Die Capacitrix Die Capacitrix is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
AFAIK there's no such thing as "Philly cheese," although I can understand why you might think there was if you'd heard the term "Philly cheese steak" but didn't know what was on it.
Here it's called Philadelphia cheese, and is even listed as such when included on ingredients list, such as for sushi.

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Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
I am now trying to figure out what kind of cheese could stand up to being grilled as a slab. My wife loves browned, almost burnt black, cheese, and would probably go nuts if there was a way to have a block of cheese with that outside.
Raclette is the most common, but it's not usually burnt to a crisp. Search for raclette grill and you'll find all sorts of tabletop grills for heating raclette. This year I saw a raclette grillpfännchen advertised for use on a normal grill. She'd probably love the cheese that's left over at the end of a fondue. Yum.
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  #42  
Old 09 September 2017, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix View Post
Here it's called Philadelphia cheese, and is even listed as such when included on ingredients list, such as for sushi.
That's a brand. It has nothing to do with Philadelphia. (It's originally from New York.) Nor with Philly cheese steaks, which aren't usually made with cream cheese!

I think Americans might not think this is a big deal because, well, Hawaiian Pizza isn't really from Hawaii, there's no city in California named Bordeaux where they make California Bordeaux.
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  #43  
Old 09 September 2017, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
Yes, I can see that he might have meant Philadelphia cheese steak. (Richard? Pipe in here!)
I had originally been going to use "Philly cheese steak" as my example, but ironically I thought "Maybe that's not actually from Philadelphia" and so switched it to the cheese spread based on a list I found in Wikipedia that implied the cheese spread brand actually was from Philadelphia! Turns out it's the other way round and so my original idea would have been a better example.
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  #44  
Old 09 September 2017, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Halloumi, feta, or ricotta are pretty hard cheeses with high melting points.
Ricotta? That comes in a tub - it's very soft, almost whey. I'm trying to think what you might mean instead. (Raclette? That's meant to be good for grilling, but it's not a hard cheese and it melts rather than retaining its texture).

Feta doesn't melt but it doesn't grill well either (in my opinion). It goes a bit softer and dries out.

It's definitely halloumi that Darth Credence wants! You can grill that in slabs almost like a piece of chicken, and it keeps its bite even with a charred outside.
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  #45  
Old 09 September 2017, 02:40 PM
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I meant ricotta. It comes in both curd form as you describe and hard form very popular smoked or baked.
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  #46  
Old 09 September 2017, 03:30 PM
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We have a large Jewish community in Ann Arbor/Detroit. My parents moved here from NYC, my mom still talks about buying Lender's frozen bagels in the grocery store for the first time and being horrified. She went to the Jewish delis for them after that. She and my grandmother actually like bagels like Lender's for certain purposes, but they always said it's not like a NY bagel.

When my grandmother was dying, the only food she would eat was an onion bagel with jalapeno cream cheese. She'd go through a dozen a day because she ate literally nothing else.

In Brussels, bagels, not so much. I don't even think most people here know what a bagel is, but I will ask around (I am sure they know of bagels but nobody around here eats them much so they don't bother).

When I lived in New York I'd frequently visit aunts and uncles in Grand Rapids who had recently decamped from NYC and always had to fill my duffel bag with fresh bagels from their favorite deli, Ess A Bagel http://www.ess-a-bagel.com/ - now they apparently ship.

My clothes always smelled like everything bagels whenever I visited

Last edited by Plurabelle; 09 September 2017 at 03:36 PM.
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  #47  
Old 09 September 2017, 03:43 PM
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We're like that about smoked meat sandwiches and about bagels from Montreal. When we go there we always come home with a bag of bagels and always, always, always have to stop off and get smoked meat sandwiches and gorgeous, juicy kosher pickles on the side. I don't know why but they just don't taste the same here no matter where we go or which restaurant or bakery we try.
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  #48  
Old 09 September 2017, 03:57 PM
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Just googled Montreal bagels. I'd love to try one someday. Apparently they're sweeter than NY bagels -- I wonder how much sweeter. If they're as sweet as that "Hawaiian bread" stuff, I probably wouldn't like them.
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  #49  
Old 09 September 2017, 06:00 PM
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Thanks, all for the cheese recommendations. I've found a place nearby that has raclette and halloumi, and I'm going to give it a go this weekend.
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  #50  
Old 09 September 2017, 11:26 PM
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Little Pink Pill Little Pink Pill is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plurabelle View Post
When my grandmother was dying, the only food she would eat was an onion bagel with jalapeno cream cheese. She'd go through a dozen a day because she ate literally nothing else.
*hijack* When my grandmother was dying at 94, the only food she wanted was canned peaches, and her children were so upset that she wouldn't eat organic vegetables that they fought her tooth and nail. I found this baffling. It was the only comfort she had left, and all they could talk about were her unhealthy choices.

Your family did it better, IMO. My kids better feed me all the bagels and cream cheese I want on my deathbed.
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  #51  
Old 10 September 2017, 12:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Little Pink Pill View Post
*hijack* When my grandmother was dying at 94, the only food she wanted was canned peaches, and her children were so upset that she wouldn't eat organic vegetables that they fought her tooth and nail. I found this baffling. It was the only comfort she had left, and all they could talk about were her unhealthy choices.
I would have found it not only baffling but enraging. (And I grow organic vegetables.) She was 94, not 4: let her eat what she wants!

-- toward the end of my mother's life, she was both very underweight and eating very little. The doctor recommended nutritional drinks, and I bought her some, though she didn't like them much and would only drink them occasionally (I didn't push her, I just bought and offered the stuff, in case she would take it.) One of my nieces looked at the label and said to me 'You bought the wrong stuff, you got the high fat version!' I said 'Yes of course I did, she needs the calories.' I got an entirely blank look in return.
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  #52  
Old 10 September 2017, 12:46 AM
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Toward the end, my mom only got enthusiastic about sweet food. We'd put tablespoons of brown sugar in her oatmeal. Every now and then my one brother would say something about her needing her protein, and I'd nod but think "like that matters now."
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  #53  
Old 10 September 2017, 02:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
We're like that about smoked meat sandwiches and about bagels from Montreal. When we go there we always come home with a bag of bagels and always, always, always have to stop off and get smoked meat sandwiches and gorgeous, juicy kosher pickles on the side. I don't know why but they just don't taste the same here no matter where we go or which restaurant or bakery we try.
I LOVE Montreal smoked meat. I don't question you a bit, I've had it in Ontario and while it's tasty, it's not Montreal smoked meat.

In a way I'm kind of happy so many regions have such specific, yummy foods cos it gives tourism another reason.

In terms of giving people dying their desired foods: YES YES YES!. I don't care what it is, please be kind to your loved ones who are dying.

We had to put my (Alzheimers + Stroke induced Dementia) mother in law in a home once she became too much for us to manage at home. We not only filled out her menus but we continue to make sure she has some good decaf coffee and lots of dutch chocolate to nibble on.

Coffee and chocolate are really all she cares about anymore, and even though right now she lives in 1940, and no longer remembers English, she keeps mentioning how she likes the chocolate and the coffee.

Anything to make her more comfortable, anything at all.
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  #54  
Old 10 September 2017, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Pink Pill View Post
*hijack* When my grandmother was dying at 94, the only food she wanted was canned peaches, and her children were so upset that she wouldn't eat organic vegetables that they fought her tooth and nail. I found this baffling. It was the only comfort she had left, and all they could talk about were her unhealthy choices.

Your family did it better, IMO. My kids better feed me all the bagels and cream cheese I want on my deathbed.
Also agree with all other that commented on this (whole heartedly) but...she made it to 94, whatever she ate seemed to work for her.

Last edited by Dasla; 10 September 2017 at 08:53 AM. Reason: ate not eat
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  #55  
Old 10 September 2017, 08:52 AM
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As for the bagel thing. There is an article in today's local paper on food tourism and, you guessed it, lox bagels in New York (with cream cheese and smoked salmon) Separate post cause it is back on topic, kinda.

I do a baked feta, wrapped in foil with olive oil and herbs and spices.
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  #56  
Old 10 September 2017, 05:36 PM
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Oh, and while I was little my mom was still really angry about moving to MI. (She wouldn't live anywhere else now, she loves the concepts of lawns and quiet and non-shared walls, but as a life-long Manhattanite with a new baby it was tough for her initially).

When I was a baby my first solid food was bagels from the Jewish deli. She'd say "this is the food of our people" and the deli owner would always object because we're gentile but she'd explain we were from NYC. I think she was still hoping to eventually move back, but we never did. (Well, I did, on my own).

I still love plain poppyseed bagels since they were basically my teething rings
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  #57  
Old 10 September 2017, 05:42 PM
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One of my favorite indulgence -- a rare indulgence -- is a salt bagel with green olive cream cheese. It is amazing, but it's a lot of salt. I know there are probably canned/frozen foods with just as much sodium, but I don't eat those.

ETA: Dasla, I'm going to try baking feta like that, it sounds amazing.
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  #58  
Old 10 September 2017, 05:52 PM
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I have to learn how to reduce my sodium for the future. Right now I have very low blood pressure and actually low sodium, so I constantly crave salt.

My mother has high blood pressure and I imagine the tide will change at some point. For her, it was pregnancy that put her BP from normal to through the roof. I've had 4 pregnancies and a hysterectomy but my BP is still very low and my sodium level below clinical recommendations.

My husband is a constant organic cooker but he allows me my canned soup and pre-packaged mac and cheese now and then.

Sometimes I just literally sprinkle a handful of salt into my hand and eat it. It's a weird craving.

They have loads of treatment options for people with high BP, but low BP and low sodium - not so much, except eat crappier.

I know one day I'll be on the other side of the coin so I'd like to learn how to regulate my salt before that happens.
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  #59  
Old 10 September 2017, 07:20 PM
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Salt apparently only causes blood pressure to be excessively high in some people.

Quite a lot of dietary advice is likely to only be sensible for some people and very much the reverse of sensible for others. If your system needs more salt than most peoples', then eating salty stuff is not unhealthy for you -- rather the reverse.
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  #60  
Old 10 September 2017, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
Thanks, all for the cheese recommendations. I've found a place nearby that has raclette and halloumi, and I'm going to give it a go this weekend.
How to Grill Halloumi

One of the dairies that comes to our local farmer's market has a halloumi grilling cheese. So amazingly good.
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