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  #21  
Old 18 April 2008, 03:14 AM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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I'm confused what time period the writer is talking about?

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Originally Posted by snopes View Post
Long ago and far away, in a land that time forgot,
Before the days of Dylan
Bob Dylan second album was out by 1963 with hits like Blowing in the Wind

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For Ike was in the White House in that land where we were born,
Ike was President from 1953-1961

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Where navels were for oranges, and Peyton Place was porn.
Peyton Place ran from 1964 to 1969

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We spread our crinolines to dry in circles on the lawn.
These were pretty much gone by the late 19th centrury

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And Eddie Fisher married Liz, and no one's seen him since.
They were married from May 12, 1959 - March 6, 1964

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We danced to 'Little Darlin,' and sang to 'Stagger Lee'
And cried for Buddy Holly in the Land That Made Me Me.
Little Darling was a hit for the Diamonds in 1957, Stagger Lee was a hit in 1959 for Lloyd Price and Buddy Holly died in 1953.

Quote:
We fell for Frankie Avalon, Annette was oh, so nice,
And when they made a movie, they never made it twice.
The Frankie Avalon/Annette movies didn't start coming out until 1963.

Quote:
We didn't have a Star Trek Five, or Psycho Two and Three,
Or Rocky-Rambo Twenty in the Land That Made Me Me.
But how many Dracula, Frankenstein, Clint Eastwood "Man With No Name" and those damn Beach movies did we have to endure?

Quote:
Miss Kitty had a heart of gold, and Chester had a limp,
Gunsmoke was on the air from 1955 to 1975.
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And Reagan was a Democrat whose co-star was a chimp.
Bedtime for Bonzo came out in 1951 which had a sequel (strange how the author keeps forgetting sequels) in 1952, Bonzo Goes to College

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We had a Mr. Wizard, but not a Mr. T,
I assume they mean Don Herbert (Mr Wizard) who was on television from 1951 to 1991.

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We had our share of heroes, we never thought they'd go,
At least not Bobby Darin, or Marilyn Monroe.
Bobby Darin didn't die until 1973 and Marylin Monroe didn't die until 1962

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For youth was still eternal, and life was yet to be,
And Elvis was forever in the Land That Made Me Me.
Elvis died in 1977.

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We'd never seen the rock band that was Grateful to be Dead,
And Airplanes weren't named Jefferson, and Zeppelins were not Led.
Grateful dead toured from 1965 until 1995. Jefferson Airplane had their first hit in 1967, and Led Zeppelin started in 1968.

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And Beatles lived in gardens then, and Monkees lived in trees,
Madonna was a virgin in the Land That Made Me Me.
the Beatles were stars in the UK by 1962 and the US by 1964. the Monkees Weren't far behind in 1965.

Quote:
We'd never heard of microwaves, or telephones in cars,
And babies might be bottle-fed, but they weren't grown in jars.
Microwaves were available since 1955 but weren't popular until the mid 1960s. and according to this by 1950 almost 50% of babies were fed from formula.

Quote:
And rocket ships were fiction in the Land That Made Me Me.
NASA was founded in 1958 and Sputnik was launched in 1957.

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And Castro came to power near the Land That Made Me Me.
Castro came to power in 1959.

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We had no Crest with Fluoride,
fluoride has been in toothpaste since at the least the 1950s and in other dental applications since before 1900. Though I don't know when specifically Crest starting using it.

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There were no golden arches, no Perrier to chill,
McDonalds opened in 1940 and by 1955 had nine locations and sold their 100 millionth hamburger by 1958. Perrier has been around since about 1898.


So what the hell time period are they referring to? My best guess is the late 1930s which I'm sure was a barrel of fun from the great depression. But then they weren't watch Marylin Monroe or Gunsmoke or Frankie Avalon. They contradict themselves so many times I think they were taking too much over the counter heroin.
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  #22  
Old 18 April 2008, 03:17 AM
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Quote:
Peyton Place ran from 1964 to 1969
Peyton Place was first a novel (and a film) in the mid-1950s, several years before it was turned into a television series.

Quote:
the Monkees Weren't far behind in 1965.
The Monkees came along in the latter half of 1966.

- snopes
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  #23  
Old 18 April 2008, 04:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post

Miss Kitty had a heart of gold, and Chester had a limp,
A limp what?? Enquiring minds need to know.
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  #24  
Old 18 April 2008, 04:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insensible Crier View Post
Buddy Holly died in 1953.
1959, actually.
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  #25  
Old 18 April 2008, 11:25 AM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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No

I'm amazed I only screwed up that much. There's probably more. Don't ever let the dyslexic guy look up dates or do your your taxes.
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  #26  
Old 18 April 2008, 11:52 AM
nanbanan nanbanan is offline
 
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I remember 'older girls' wearing crinolines in the mid to late 50's. It's what made poodle skirts and prom dresses stand out. They were dried on the lawn because hanging them would make a crease and a drier would make them limp. I was born in '52 and I remember thinking they were Bea-U-ti-ful.
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  #27  
Old 18 April 2008, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanbanan View Post
I was born in '52 and I remember thinking they were Bea-U-ti-ful.
Thanks to years of watching Happy Days as a kid, so did I.
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  #28  
Old 18 April 2008, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanbanan View Post
I remember 'older girls' wearing crinolines in the mid to late 50's. It's what made poodle skirts and prom dresses stand out. They were dried on the lawn because hanging them would make a crease and a drier would make them limp. I was born in '52 and I remember thinking they were Bea-U-ti-ful.
Pedantically, they were not true crinolines. The name is used, but compared to the real thing, pffftt- they're just mere petticoats. (By which I mean any somewhat-stiffened skirt that goes under your outermost skirt.)
'Crinoline' was originally a term for a stiff horsehair fabric, which was used for petticoats during the early 19th century and thus became the name for the undergarment itself. This was replaced by the alarmingly big steel hoop-skirt in later decades, which cemented the meaning of the word (i.e. 'big steel hoop-skirt') as they attracted so much attention.
I've seen the 50s ones, and modern versions, referred to by the name (marketing perhaps? oldstyle glamour?) but technically they are not. Certainly, nylon isn't as fearsome as steel. (I dry mine upside-down, they wouldn't fit on my smidgeon of lawn.)

I would be most surprised if ladies of the Gay Nineties (there's that word again!) spread their crinolines out on the lawn, because passers-by might be scandalised by the sight of feminine undies.
However I am obviously much more of a pedant than the OP writer.

Anyway...
Quote:
And only in our wildest dreams did we expect to see
A boy named George with Lipstick, in the Land That Made Me Me.
Wildest dreams, eh? Well, whatever butters your biscuit.

I recall Enid Blyton writing about a girl called George, but without the lippy. But that's from a different Magical Land.
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  #29  
Old 19 April 2008, 04:18 AM
senshisteph senshisteph is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pudding Crawl View Post
I recall Enid Blyton writing about a girl called George, but without the lippy. But that's from a different Magical Land.
Though to be fair, she did want to be a boy.
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  #30  
Old 19 April 2008, 05:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insensible Crier View Post
Microwaves were available since 1955 but weren't popular until the mid 1960s.
I remember reading a story in 16 magazine in the late 60s about the fabulous house Mike Nesmith of the Monkees had. He had an oven that could bake a potato in a few minutes! That was an amazing thing back then. I don't think I knew of anyone with a microwave until almost 1980.

I was trying to figure out the era the writer had in mind as well.
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  #31  
Old 19 April 2008, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dear Babby View Post
I remember reading a story in 16 magazine in the late 60s about the fabulous house Mike Nesmith of the Monkees had. He had an oven that could bake a potato in a few minutes! That was an amazing thing back then. I don't think I knew of anyone with a microwave until almost 1980.

I was trying to figure out the era the writer had in mind as well.
I recall first hearing about microwaves in the late '60s (in college); didn't actually get one until 1990; although I knew many others who did have them from the early '80s.
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  #32  
Old 20 April 2008, 03:51 AM
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Man, this glurge is disappointingly inoffensive. I was hoping these would be the lost verses to the song from "All in the Family."
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  #33  
Old 21 April 2008, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insensible Crier View Post
So what the hell time period are they referring to? My best guess is the late 1930s which I'm sure was a barrel of fun from the great depression.
Even those years won't fit. They were making these endless "Buck Rogers", "Tarzan" or "Flash Gordon" movie serials back then... and Ike was just US Army brass.

No. It's just silly, badly documented, and tries to make you feel nostalgic for a generic past that never existed.
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  #34  
Old 21 April 2008, 07:01 PM
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Almost the exact same poem is circulating online with the title "In the Land of Sandra Dee". That line also replaces the oft-repeated "In the Land that Made Me Me." It's sometimes attributed to Leland Waldrip, but it appears that in his posting of the poem, he attributes it to "anonymous" and says he was sent it by a friend: http://www.authorsden.com/categories...d=19&id=170790

Can anyone clarify who the "Jean McKinney" referenced in the poem is?
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  #35  
Old 21 April 2008, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Cyrano View Post
No. It's just silly, badly documented, and tries to make you feel nostalgic for a generic past that never existed.
Oh, it existed. You just have to have lived for about 150 years to experience it.

Damn 150-year-olds, always romanticizing the past like that.
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  #36  
Old 22 April 2008, 01:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insensible Crier View Post
fluoride has been in toothpaste since at the least the 1950s and in other dental applications since before 1900. Though I don't know when specifically Crest starting using it.
Assuming Wikipedia can be believed, Crest has always had fluoride. When it was introduced in 1955 it was the first toothpaste to include fluoride.

As far as I can tell, there is no single year they could possibly be talking about.
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  #37  
Old 22 April 2008, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by queen of the caramels View Post
A limp what?? Enquiring minds need to know.
Probably because his muffler was gutted.
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  #38  
Old 23 April 2008, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitap View Post
Crinolines? Are they reminiscing about the 1860s?
I think the writer means petticoats. My mother was born in 1940 we have a few pictures of the phenomenon described here.
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  #39  
Old 23 April 2008, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyK418 View Post
Can anyone clarify who the "Jean McKinney" referenced in the poem is?
The only prominent "Jean McKinney" I can think of is the Protestant woman who was abducted and murdered by the IRA in 1972. But I don't see how that event fits the poem, and it seems too late for the timeframe.

- snopes
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  #40  
Old 24 April 2008, 12:24 AM
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RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
 
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Quote:
What the hell does "gut a muffler" mean?
It means take apart a car muffler, back in the days when kids didn't have high tech toys, and took apart car parts and appliances for fun. IIRC, kids did this in the 1970s, and still do it today. A car muffler back then, of course, came with a nice coating of lead from the gasoline. And I hope the kids had their tetanus shots.

If you think of the dresses that Grace Kelly wore in Rear Window, what made them puffy is what most people think crinoline is, whether it is or not.

Microwaves have been around for awhile, they just went by the name "radar range."

Isn't it amazing how people never long for the days when people locked their kids in the house in August so they wouldn't get polio? Or the days when a five-year-old could lose a hand while working a ten-hour shift at the factory? Or the only employment option disabled people had was selling pencils on a streetcorner? Or hotels were "restricted"?

I kept expecting this one to veer off into the "kids don't know what fun is these days, and they grow up all sissified from not playing with guns, or practicing 'duck and cover.'" That it didn't does not make up for it being the worst poetry I've seen since my junior high year book.
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