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  #741  
Old 04 February 2017, 01:19 AM
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Basically after hearing about how both Napoleon and Hitler failed in invading Russia, I thought I'd ask: What's in Russia that even makes it worth trying? What does Russia have that can't be found in a saner country or at least one that doesn't consider any cold not bad enough to summon legions of white walkers to be shorts weather?

And I know technically both Hitler and Napoleon started their invasions during Summer, but they forgot to take into account Russia's Summer can only be called Mud. By the time they managed to drag their forces through a sea of mud, Winter had arrived and you can guess how things went from there. So I'll reiterate: Why invade Russia?
  #742  
Old 04 February 2017, 01:55 AM
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Why invade Russia?
The same reason you climb a mountain: Because it's there.
OR, the same reason you marry a princess in Monty Python and the Holy Grail: HUGE tracts of land.

It is a rich country, with a lot of rich farmland that just needs to be taken over, and in the case of those two generals, it was full of enemies who would attack them at some point.
  #743  
Old 04 February 2017, 01:56 AM
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Continental hegemony, even world domination too. And remember: Napolean at least took Moscow, it just didn't bring about the desired Russian surrender or a avoidable peace treaty. Sometimes the opponent doesn't respond as you think they should. I mean, by rights, the Iraq War should have been firmly settled a decade ago...
  #744  
Old 04 February 2017, 02:40 AM
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Food. The steppes of Russia produce tremendous amounts of wheat.
  #745  
Old 04 February 2017, 10:13 AM
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I got a shock in one ear from my headphones after touching a static-y bin bag. How did this happen?
  #746  
Old 04 February 2017, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Blatherskite View Post
I got a shock in one ear from my headphones after touching a static-y bin bag. How did this happen?
This actually happens to me at work all the time (I have to wear an earpiece that's connected to a walkie talkie), usually if I take a fleece sweatshirt off too quickly. Particularly this time of year, when the humidity is really low.

I've no idea why or how it happens (I would guess the insulation for the wire isn't especially thick, so the static can travel up the copper wiring), I just wanted you to know it's not a freak occurrence.
  #747  
Old 05 February 2017, 12:58 PM
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Not only is plastic not (necessarily) an insulator, it can generate and transmit static electric shocks.

Some years ago, one of my coworkers and I spent a couple of months running fiber optic cables around our city. I was the driver of our bucket truck, he was in the bucket doing the hauling. Easily a dozen times, the static charge that built up in the plastic cable jacket as it was pulled through hundreds, and then later thousands, of feet of utility poles and suspension equipment, gave him shocks so intense that at first, he thought he'd been zapped by the electric utility's wires.
  #748  
Old 05 February 2017, 03:06 PM
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Is there a traditional ceremony when someone has flown (or drove) faster than the speed of sound?
  #749  
Old 05 February 2017, 03:20 PM
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If they cross the equator while going faster than the speed of sound, they have to dance a hornpipe, but nobody can hear the music.
  #750  
Old 05 February 2017, 04:24 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crius of CoH View Post
Not only is plastic not (necessarily) an insulator, it can generate and transmit static electric shocks. ....
Fun fact: the word "electric" derives from the Greek "like amber," referring to materials that could attract small objects after being rubbed, as amber does.

Nick
  #751  
Old 05 February 2017, 06:23 PM
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The voltages of static electricity can be huge, thousands of volts. So they can cross insulation such as plastic or a thin gap of air - or even a large one in the case of lightning. Like lightning, it's most likely to travel one of the shortest paths, which often happens to be a wire going right up to your ear.
  #752  
Old 05 February 2017, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
The voltages of static electricity can be huge, thousands of volts. So they can cross insulation such as plastic or a thin gap of air - or even a large one in the case of lightning. Like lightning, it's most likely to travel one of the shortest paths, which often happens to be a wire going right up to your ear.
It's thought that British WW2 commando leader Ord Wingate died when his plane's pilot got zapped by static on his ear phones and passed out. They were trailing a long antenna wire from the back of the plane.
  #753  
Old 05 February 2017, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Is there a traditional ceremony when someone has flown (or drove) faster than the speed of sound?
I doubt there is a ceremony for driving faster than the sound barrier since, IIRC, only one person has ever done it.
  #754  
Old 05 February 2017, 08:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
The voltages of static electricity can be huge, thousands of volts. So they can cross insulation such as plastic or a thin gap of air - or even a large one in the case of lightning. Like lightning, it's most likely to travel one of the shortest paths, which often happens to be a wire going right up to your ear.
Tens of thousands of votes are common for even minor static charges (like simply rubbing a plastic pen in your hair). Lightning discharges sometime exceed a billion of volts.
  #755  
Old 05 February 2017, 08:37 PM
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One of the all time greatest simple electronic circuits will detect static electricity fields; http://amasci.com/emotor/chargdet.html
This circuit will detect a person lifting their foot off the floor by detect the static charge created when almost any two dissimilar materials come into contact and then are puled apart. the circuit also explains why some electronic devices are so sensitive to static charge that they are shipped in special anti-static bags.
  #756  
Old 05 February 2017, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Tens of thousands of votes are common for even minor static charges
Yeah, but if it weren't for all the electrons that voted illegally you wouldn't get a shock.
  #757  
Old 05 February 2017, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blatherskite View Post
I got a shock in one ear from my headphones after touching a static-y bin bag. How did this happen?
I'm having a hard time imagining a static-y bin bag.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadsterboy View Post
This actually happens to me at work all the time (I have to wear an earpiece that's connected to a walkie talkie), usually if I take a fleece sweatshirt off too quickly. Particularly this time of year, when the humidity is really low.

I've no idea why or how it happens (I would guess the insulation for the wire isn't especially thick, so the static can travel up the copper wiring), I just wanted you to know it's not a freak occurrence.
I would have thought it would be the other way around - that is to say, the static is from you! The headphone wiring has to end in bare wires somewhere inside the earpiece in order to connect to the speaker, moreover, sometimes the speaker itself is covered in thin metal to protect the speaker cone. There's no electricity in a doorknob when you touch it and get a shock after walking across a carpet. Sometimes just getting close to something metal is enough to cause a spark to jump.
  #758  
Old 06 February 2017, 02:18 AM
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The static is just a difference in charge so it can be from either direction. There is plenty of electricity in a doorknob if there's a difference in charge between it and something else, namely, a body.
  #759  
Old 06 February 2017, 07:27 AM
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Static discharge can also create radio waves and he headphone wiring can act like an antenna and pick up the frequency: http://electronics.stackexchange.com...adio-frequency
  #760  
Old 06 February 2017, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Tens of thousands of votes are common for even minor static charges (like simply rubbing a plastic pen in your hair). Lightning discharges sometime exceed a billion of volts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Yeah, but if it weren't for all the electrons that voted illegally you wouldn't get a shock.
I was thinking votes...hair...do you think Trump's hair did it?
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