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  #1  
Old 16 August 2016, 10:42 PM
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Default Cambridge Face Memory Test

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Quote:
Your accuracy in the experiment was: 44%

The average score on this test is around 80% correct responses for adult participants.
A score of 60% or below may indicate face blindness.
I'm not surprised -- most of the time they all looked alike to me. You generally get three choices, so pure chance would I expect give a score of roughly 33.

(If you score very low or very high, and live close enough, and are willing, they may ask you to participate in further research. You can easily check 'no' even if you live next door, though.)
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Old 16 August 2016, 10:59 PM
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Wow, I got 88%, which surprises me as I feel like I often have difficulty recognizing people. I guess with me it's inattention or something rather than face blindness.
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  #3  
Old 16 August 2016, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Your accuracy in the experiment was: 53%

The average score on this test is around 80% correct responses for adult participants.
A score of 60% or below may indicate face blindness.
I've been working as a front desk receptionist for over a year and it's helped me learn different ways to recognize people (though I still make embarrassing gaffes sometimes, like if someone dropped off their dog to me in the morning and then changed clothes before picking the dog up in the afternoon, I might not know who they are when they come back.)

I have a strange form of face-blindness. First, it doesn't affect me with everyone I meet. If I meet someone for the first time, I never know if I'll immediately recognize them again. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. I couldn't give you a percentage of the times this happens, but it's much easier for me to recognize a person if I know I'll have to see them again and I'm making an effort to remember what they look like. (Or, more likely, how they walk, or talk, or their tattoos, or what their hair looks like. Those are much easier for me to recognize.)

But once my brain does make the connection, I'll always recognize that person afterwards. It's like a switch flips on and I never have to worry about not recognizing them again. So although I have a form of face-blindness, it's not continuous, it's more of a facial-recognition delay when I meet certain new people.
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Old 17 August 2016, 12:17 AM
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89%, which was surprising, because it got really hard when they all turned to static at the end. It seemed like mostly guessing at that point, but the number would suggest better than random odds. In this quiz, some of it was remembering the exact orientation and lighting of the specific photos they would use, which would not be a very applicable skill in real life.

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Originally Posted by wanderwoman View Post
Wow, I got 88%, which surprises me as I feel like I often have difficulty recognizing people. I guess with me it's inattention or something rather than face blindness.
Same. I tend to do fairly well on tests like this, but in real life I do not feel confident about this sort of thing, especially seeing people out the usual context. There have been times when I did actually recognize someone in an utterly improbable circumstance, but didn't have the certainty to approach them at the time. Besides just not always paying enough attention to people, I think part of the reason that I'm not confident about recognizing them is that I often can't visualize them from memory. I may know them when I see them, but if I'm not looking at them I can't picture their features, which makes me second guess whether I actually know their face or not. I don't know for sure if I will until I do, or don't. Also, I'm borderline needing glasses for distance vision but not enough to bother with them, so I don't always get as good a look at people from far away as on a screen.

Last edited by Errata; 17 August 2016 at 12:26 AM.
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  #5  
Old 17 August 2016, 12:26 AM
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[/quote]Thank you for taking part in this experiment.
Your accuracy in the experiment was: 71%

The average score on this test is around 80% correct responses for adult participants.
A score of 60% or below may indicate face blindness.[/quote]By the end I was pretty much just guessing.

So I will probably never work for Scotland Yard.
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  #6  
Old 17 August 2016, 12:39 AM
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92%, which doesn't surprise me because I can usually pick out even an actor with a small part if I've seen them in another movie or television show.

But it's names that elude me, especially if they're white men with names who start with "J." It might take me months to remember which J name goes with a face.
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  #7  
Old 17 August 2016, 02:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellestar View Post
92%, which doesn't surprise me because I can usually pick out even an actor with a small part if I've seen them in another movie or television show.

But it's names that elude me, especially if they're white men with names who start with "J." It might take me months to remember which J name goes with a face.

Never work with the Duggars then..
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  #8  
Old 17 August 2016, 05:02 AM
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67%...I work customer service and sometimes it's really important to remember a person. I'm especially bad when it's really busy (almost all of the time) because I'm trying to move em' on through.

It usually takes me months to remember a face, and put a name to it. At least at work. Drives my boss crazy. Me: "Boss, some guy just drove off." Boss: "What did he look like? What was he wearing?" Me: "????" Boss: "Did you ask him if he had gas?" Me: "Umm...I think so." So we watch the tape and listen to the video. The guy looks vaguely familiar from just having seen him. He was not a "regular" and he tells me he has gas, and I don't ring it up. Though I think in that instance I didn't hear him because I was right in front of the pizza oven/fan, and he was about a foot from the register. I, however, did not ask him. He knew though, he paid with cash, only bought a fountain pop, and drove away with $20 of gas.

My best Friend, whom I hadn't seen in a couple years, came to the store and was smiling and waving at me from the back of the line. I was thinking: 'Who is that weird lady?' Another of my best friends from school came in the other day. I hadn't seen her in over 10 years. She looked familiar and she said "Hi Syl how are you?" I said..."I know you." She said, "You ought to we went to school together...I'm (my friends name)" It was so odd because her voice was more familiar than her face. That's why I knew that she should be very familiar. Once she said who she was her face just clicked into place.
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  #9  
Old 17 August 2016, 05:35 AM
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65%, which sounds about right, given the cutoff for face blindness is around 60%. I am the worst person I've ever met at Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon because I can't recognize actors in movies to save my life. (They do their hair differently in each one! And they gain and lose weight and change their makeup or facial hair! What am I supposed to do with that?) The only time I can recognize celebrities is if I've watched multiple seasons of a show they've starred in. I struggle to recognize people I've met only a few times unless they have a very distinctive look about them. It can be very embarrassing. I wish my life were a cartoon where everyone had a personal uniform they wore every day.

What makes this worse is that I apparently look like a lot of other people, so strangers are always coming up to me thinking I'm someone else, and out of embarrasment I'll sometimes try to act like I recognize them while I frantically hope they drop a hint...it can very quickly devolve into a comedy of errors.
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  #10  
Old 17 August 2016, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylvanz View Post
67%...I work customer service and sometimes it's really important to remember a person.
Most of my sales are direct-market, primarily through farmers' markets. It's been useful to be able to at least hang a name on the problem -- I often add 'It's a real disadvantage for a direct marketer!' But at least now I can explain myself when a regular comes through and asks me 'Did you see which way my sister went?' and I have no idea who his sister is or whether I was talking to her three minutes ago.

Sometimes there's no easy way to work it into the conversation, though; or I don't think of it in time. I once had a customer show up as I was packing up. I was exhausted, even more so than usual. He bought a lot of stuff, which was nice; but he kept wanting me to haul things back out of the van so he could choose, and I desperately wanted to get home and fall down. He said he'd been trying to get down earlier but work wouldn't let him. I served him, but I let the exhaustion show, and that I wasn't really happy about taking things back out that had already been packed up. Too late, after he left, I realized that this was probably not a random person I'd never seen before, but someone who had been a regular in previous years under a different work schedule, and if so almost certainly thought that I knew who he was, but thought that I was so annoyed that he was late that I wouldn't even greet him. As I of course still had no idea who it had been, it wasn't possible to make any attempt to get ahold of him and apologize. If I'd been less exhausted, I might have picked up on it in time.

-- I find it interesting that even people who are having significant problems are in some cases getting scores in the upper 60's on the test. They'd carefully removed all the other cues one can often go by in real life situations -- though, as has been pointed out, those cues can be misleading. I wish people would keep that purple sweater on, and not shave or grow out their beards and change their hairstyles!
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  #11  
Old 17 August 2016, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Your accuracy in the experiment was: 99%

The average score on this test is around 80% correct responses for adult participants.
A score of 60% or below may indicate face blindness.


When I was a little kid I had some pretty serious visual impairments that made it really hard for me to tell people apart. Like I basically had to rely on a person's size and hair/skin tone, hairstyle, facial hair, and whether they had glasses. Voice too, but that doens't help here. As I got older I wonder if I worked to overcome that and wound up kind of overcompensating for it.

I might not always be able to place a name to a face, but I'm good at finding someone if I'm looking out over a big crowd, or identifying a person from the back of their head or their gait.

I expected to do much worse because a lot of times, when I'm watching TV or meet someone new, I think about who I've met before that the new face reminds me of. Like, "Hmm, this guy reminds me of if Bob's face was on Jack's skull, and with Amy's eyes." And often times if I voice this, people who I'm with strain to see what I'm "seeing." (though sometimes they'll concede that I'm correct )

I've also done a small amount of caricaturing/portraits in my time, so maybe there's some skills in there I picked up that add to the ability.
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Old 17 August 2016, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellestar View Post
92%, which doesn't surprise me because I can usually pick out even an actor with a small part if I've seen them in another movie or television show.

But it's names that elude me, especially if they're white men with names who start with "J." It might take me months to remember which J name goes with a face.
88% for me, and a very similar experience re putting names to faces! (Thank god for seating charts in my choir classes!) I've gotten better at it over my years of teaching, but I still have occasionally have trouble remembering which student I'm talking to if they aren't in their assigned spot (for example, if they come up to the front to ask me for a hall pass).
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Old 17 August 2016, 03:47 PM
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One way it's sort of amusing is that I have to card anyone for tobacco/alcohol who doesn't look like they're in their 30's. I will card the same people over, and over, and over, but I always recognize their I'd's.
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Old 17 August 2016, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbravo View Post

Quote:
Your accuracy in the experiment was: 99%
When I was a little kid I had some pretty serious visual impairments that made it really hard for me to tell people apart. Like I basically had to rely on a person's size and hair/skin tone, hairstyle, facial hair, and whether they had glasses. Voice too, but that doens't help here. As I got older I wonder if I worked to overcome that and wound up kind of overcompensating for it.
mbravo, I might be wrong, but I think it's extremely unusual to have a shift that drastic (other than in the other direction, and then from brain injury). You might want to contact some researchers.
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Old 17 August 2016, 04:10 PM
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87%. I felt pretty confidant about everyone until the static part. A few of the ones there I couldn't make out a single feature, and was just guessing.
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  #16  
Old 17 August 2016, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
mbravo, I might be wrong, but I think it's extremely unusual to have a shift that drastic (other than in the other direction, and then from brain injury). You might want to contact some researchers.
That's a good idea. I should probably get in touch with some folks.

I don't know if the interest of the improvement is mitigated by the fact that I had my stronger eye patched and was doing most of my seeing with my weaker eye until I was 7. (I would have to keep it on for all of or at least most of the school day, which is when I would have been seeing the largest variety of people).

Either way it's probably worth looking into.
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Old 18 August 2016, 03:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Sylvanz View Post
One way it's sort of amusing is that I have to card anyone for tobacco/alcohol who doesn't look like they're in their 30's. I will card the same people over, and over, and over, but I always recognize their I'd's.
Yeah, I think the test may not translate perfectly to real life because it's easier to recognize a photo than a person. One of the faces had deep under-eye creases; that's how I recognized him every time. In different lighting they might be less obvious. Also it's easier to study someone's face when they're not aware of you looking at them, making you self-conscious about staring, or distracting your attention from their distinctive eyebrows by talking to you.
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Old 18 August 2016, 11:11 AM
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49% Mostly because the one guy had a long face and another had a distinctive chin. I have to pretend to recognize a lot of regulars here at work.
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Old 18 August 2016, 11:18 AM
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I scored 88% but I think I lost all my points on the last set, with the "snowy" photos. I really could not even distinguish people on some of those.

And I am relatively strong at visual memory anyways. So, I'm not surprised.

If those men had names, it would take me a day or two to get their names down though.
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  #20  
Old 18 August 2016, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
I think the test may not translate perfectly to real life because it's easier to recognize a photo than a person. .
I don't find that to be so.

An actual person provides a batch of cues, other than the face, some of which aren't provided by a photo; even a photo that doesn't give you only the face.

I'm curious: the non-faceblind among you: do the rest of you find photos easier to recognize than people?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbravo View Post
I don't know if the interest of the improvement is mitigated by the fact that I had my stronger eye patched and was doing most of my seeing with my weaker eye until I was 7.
I would think they'd be highly interested in trying to figure out whether that's relevant. Is it possible to be faceblind in one eye and not the other? Is it connected at all with binocular vision? Etcetera.


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Originally Posted by UEL View Post
If those men had names
Did you think they were all male? In some cases I couldn't tell.
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