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  #41  
Old 20 May 2014, 02:21 PM
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THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What country's current president, Michael Martelly, became famous there in the 1990s as Sweet Micky, a popular "compas" musician?
Belgium
Quote:


2. What television actor, best known for a 1960s role, released his own fragrance line last year, "Eau My"?
John Hamm (a 1960s role could refer to the years the show was set, right?) or, if you're going to be picky, William Shatner (if it wasn't, it should've been).
Quote:


3. What word for a halogen salt can also refer to a boring cliche, because it was once a common ingredient in sedatives?
soporific
Quote:


4. Or, gules, vert, and purpure are among the colors used in what art form and field of study?
heralrdy
Quote:


5. The chorus of Mack Rice's biggest hit song, later made famous by Wilson Pickett, incidentally includes the name of what future astronaut?
Ride, Sally Ride
Quote:


6. What best-selling 2012 novel begins with the disappearance of Amy Dunne from her new hometown, North Carthage, Missouri?
The Lovely Bones
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by these famous people? Eubie Blake, Gordon Brown, Tim Daly, Langston Hughes, Hugh Laurie, Paul McCartney, Tim McCarver, David Niven, Dan Quayle, Strom Thurmond.
Interesting list. I don't know half of them, but at least two are musicians, two are actors, two are U.S. politicians (and not the same two in any category). One is a well-known poet. Maybe they're all poets but (some) didn't know it.

Seaboe
  #42  
Old 20 May 2014, 02:30 PM
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5. is heraldics (heraldy? The study of coats of arms and flags and so on).
  #43  
Old 20 May 2014, 03:25 PM
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2. What television actor, best known for a 1960s role, released his own fragrance line last year, "Eau My"? No idea, but I love the name!

3. What word for a halogen salt can also refer to a boring cliche, because it was once a common ingredient in sedatives? Bromide?

4. Or, gules, vert, and purpure are among the colors used in what art form and field of study? Heraldry?

5. The chorus of Mack Rice's biggest hit song, later made famous by Wilson Pickett, incidentally includes the name of what future astronaut? Hah! Sally Ride!
  #44  
Old 27 May 2014, 10:30 AM
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Greetings, all.

Here's the latest installment of trivia. As always, question 7 is delayed a week, as per Mr Jennings' request.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. What country's current president, Michael Martelly, became famous there in the 1990s as Sweet Micky, a popular "compas" musician? Compas is the national music of Haiti.

2. What television actor, best known for a 1960s role, released his own fragrance line last year, "Eau My"? George Takei never said "Oh, my" as Sulu on Star Trek, but it's become his Howard Stern Show catchphrase.

3. What word for a halogen salt can also refer to a boring cliche, because it was once a common ingredient in sedatives? Potassium bromide was once used as a sedative, so "bromides" today are expressions so trite they'll put your audience to sleep.

4. Or, gules, vert, and purpure are among the colors used in what art form and field of study? Heraldry has its own colors, called "tincture." Or is golden, gules is red, vert is green, and purpure is purple. I only wanted 2 see U laughing in the purpure rain.

5. The chorus of Mack Rice's biggest hit song, later made famous by Wilson Pickett, incidentally includes the name of what future astronaut? The chorus of "Mustang Sally" repeats the phrase "Ride, Sally, Ride," accidentally name-checking the future astronaut.

6. What best-selling 2012 novel begins with the disappearance of Amy Dunne from her new hometown, North Carthage, Missouri? Amy is the title missing person in Gillian Flynn's mega-selling thriller Gone Girl, soon to be a major motion picture.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these famous people? Eubie Blake, Gordon Brown, Tim Daly, Langston Hughes, Hugh Laurie, Paul McCartney, Tim McCarver, David Niven, Dan Quayle, Strom Thurmond. Each went by his middle name, because his real first name was "James." Probably the only time you'll ever see Tim Daly and Langston Hughes's names together.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target?

2. What large lake on the border of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland is named for the emperor who founded a 4th-century Roman dynasty?

3. "Ionization" is the name of the phase transition in which matter in what phase changes to matter in what other phase?

4. What musical acronym was used for the U.S. government program set up in 2009 to help "underwater" homeowners avoid foreclosure?

5. Who died of a heart attack on November 29, 1924, leaving a work named Turandot unfinished?

6. In China, oolong is a type of what?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas.
  #45  
Old 27 May 2014, 01:59 PM
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1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target? Yellow?

3. "Ionization" is the name of the phase transition in which matter in what phase changes to matter in what other phase? Gas to plasma?

4. What musical acronym was used for the U.S. government program set up in 2009 to help "underwater" homeowners avoid foreclosure? HARP?

5. Who died of a heart attack on November 29, 1924, leaving a work named Turandot unfinished? Puccini?

6. In China, oolong is a type of what? Tea?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas.

Yikes. "And no others?" Given all the holidays and observances in existence, those have to be some pretty specific distinguishing criteria.
  #46  
Old 27 May 2014, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target?

I cannot recall, so I will say black

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas.

Yikes. "And no others?" Given all the holidays and observances in existence, those have to be some pretty specific distinguishing criteria.
The KJ Trivia questions generally seem to be USA-centric, though. That would narrow it considerably. But still, it is a difficult list. i thought maybe US observances that predate the USA and/or the N. American colonies (that would explain the 'arguably' on T-giving, since there are other t'giving days in other countries). But such observances as St. Patrick's Day predate the Am. colonies. What would apply to the vernal equinox, but not the Autumnal equinox or the solstices? If those were included, I would guess US observances which are set by astronomical references. The vernal equinox's inclusion also rules out such things as days when stores or closed or when special meals are eaten.
  #47  
Old 27 May 2014, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target?
red
Quote:


2. What large lake on the border of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland is named for the emperor who founded a 4th-century Roman dynasty?
Geneva
Quote:


3. "Ionization" is the name of the phase transition in which matter in what phase changes to matter in what other phase?
solid to liquid
Quote:


4. What musical acronym was used for the U.S. government program set up in 2009 to help "underwater" homeowners avoid foreclosure?
c-note
Quote:


5. Who died of a heart attack on November 29, 1924, leaving a work named Turandot unfinished?
The actor who played the shiek, who wasn't Ramon Navarro, although that's the name that keeps popping into my head.
Quote:


6. In China, oolong is a type of what?
Dragon. I'm pretty sure it's tea in other countries, though (Tea with the Black Dragon, anyone?)
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas.
The U.S. Government has not successfully moved them off their actual dates and put them on a Monday.

Seaboe
  #48  
Old 27 May 2014, 05:46 PM
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Baseball I might be 1 for 7 this time.

1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target? Last time I shot an arrow, it was yellow.

2. What large lake on the border of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland is named for the emperor who founded a 4th-century Roman dynasty? Dunno. Lake Constance? Only lake I can recall off the top of myhead.

3. "Ionization" is the name of the phase transition in which matter in what phase changes to matter in what other phase? Dunno. Solid to gas?

4. What musical acronym was used for the U.S. government program set up in 2009 to help "underwater" homeowners avoid foreclosure? Dunno. Allegro?

5. Who died of a heart attack on November 29, 1924, leaving a work named Turandot unfinished? Dunno. Picasso?

6. In China, oolong is a type of what? Dunno. Noodle?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas. Depending upon what region of the world you are in, they can fall on different dates.
  #49  
Old 03 June 2014, 08:43 AM
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Happy Tuesday, everyone.

Here are last week's answers and this week's questions. As always, question 7 is delayed one week.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. What color is the bullseye in the middle of a competitive archery target? The rings go, from outermost to innermost: white, black, blue, red, yellow. Yellow is the bullseye. The Target logo has been lying to you.

2. What large lake on the border of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland is named for the emperor who founded a 4th-century Roman dynasty? Lake Constance is the third largest lake in central Europe. Konstanz, Germany, on its shores, was named for the founder of Rome's Constantinian dynasty.

3. "Ionization" is the name of the phase transition in which matter in what phase changes to matter in what other phase? Ionization is what happens when a gas turns into a plasma.

4. What musical acronym was used for the U.S. government program set up in 2009 to help "underwater" homeowners avoid foreclosure? The Home Affordable Refinance Program was better known as HARP.

5. Who died of a heart attack on November 29, 1924, leaving a work named Turandot unfinished? Turandot was the last opera of Giacomo Puccini.

6. In China, oolong is a type of what? Oolong, made by oxidizing the leaves, is a traditional Chinese tea.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these holidays and observances, and no others? New Year's Day, Valentine's Day, the vernal equinox, Halloween, Thanksgiving (arguably), and Christmas. These are all the celebrations that the caller is NOT observing, by his own admission, in Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called to Say I Love You." I have no idea if anyone got this Question Seven right, but at least it cracked me up at the time.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote?

2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July?

3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country?

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)?

5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf?

6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these movies? The Age of Innocence, Anchorman 2, Moonrise Kingdom, Pete's Dragon, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz, The Ring.
  #50  
Old 03 June 2014, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country?
The Peoples Republic of China (allowing self-gouvernment of Hong-Kong).

I claim one point for last weeks question 2.: The lake in question isn't called Lake Constance (or any variety thereof) in any of the bordering nations, it's the "Bodensee".
  #51  
Old 03 June 2014, 01:11 PM
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1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote?

P. L. Travers, I would assume.

2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July?

No idea.

3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country?

China, in regards to Hong Kong.

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)?

Judas Priest.

5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf?

Nissan.

6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994?

Griffon.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these movies? The Age of Innocence, Anchorman 2, Moonrise Kingdom, Pete's Dragon, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz, The Ring.

Not coming up with anything.
  #52  
Old 03 June 2014, 01:36 PM
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2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July?

Gotta be Prince George
  #53  
Old 03 June 2014, 01:48 PM
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1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote? P.L. Travers

2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July? Prince Harry?

3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country? The United Kingdom?

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)? Judas Priest

5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf? Nissan

6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994? The Gryphon (for Merv Griffin, the show's creator)
  #54  
Old 03 June 2014, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote?
Mary Travers
Quote:


2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July?
Tony Blair
Quote:


3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country?
Canada
Quote:


4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)?
Rush
Quote:


5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf?
Chevy
Quote:


6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994?
Oh, look, a question I can answer! A griffin, of course.
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by these movies? The Age of Innocence, Anchorman 2, Moonrise Kingdom, Pete's Dragon, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz, The Ring.
Unusual, huh? Then it can't be that I haven't seen it (actually, I have seen Pete's Dragon). They have units of the Skyrim MRPG named for them.

Seaboe
  #55  
Old 03 June 2014, 06:58 PM
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Baseball Easier this week. I think I got 4.

1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote?

I dunno, Nora Roberts.

2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July?

Eligible in July? If it is talking about becoming a person in July, that would be Prince George.

3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country?

I recall it being China for Macau and Hong Kong.

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)?

One of my staples in my Walkman growing up. Judas Priest was and is a favourite of mine. The only Metal band I listened to, because of that voice.

5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf?

We have one parked near work, electric car that is. Nissan rolled out the Leaf.

6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994?

I dunno. The lion and kitten are not mythical. Unicorn.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these movies? The Age of Innocence, Anchorman 2, Moonrise Kingdom, Pete's Dragon, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz, The Ring.

I've only seen Pete's Dragon (about 35 years ago) and Sherlock Holmes. I have no clue. My guess, costume award nominations for animation or CGI characters.
  #56  
Old 10 June 2014, 12:17 PM
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Greetings, all. Here are last week's answers and this week's questions. As always, question 7 is delayed one week as per Ken Jennings' request.

I also thought I should perhaps post the greeting / opening remarks Mr. Jennings makes in his emails, so they're included as well.

"Knowledge that is not replenished diminishes every day," according to an old Chinese proverb. Every Tuesday, we here at Ken-Jennings.com fight back against the dying of the neurons with our little trivia quiz. We hope you enjoy this weekly knowledge-replenishing.

It occurs to me that some of you might not follow on the popular social media service Twitter! This is a sad mistake, but it's easily remedied. I'm @kenjennings and even if you're not on Twitter, it's generally agreed that my feed alone is worth the signup. Some trivia, more jokes, mostly a way to keep me away from real work.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote? The Australian bio became an American hit last year when the Disney movie Saving Mr. Banks was SORT OF based on it.

2. In 2013, who did the Evening Standard place atop their list of London's 1,000 most powerful people, even though he only became eligible in July? Prince George is more powerful than the mayor of London, even if he can't control his bowel movements.

3. "One nation, two systems," was the constitutional principle unveiled in 1984 to allow for self-government in certain regions of what country? That was China's slogan to allow for the re-integration of ultra-capitalist Hong Kong and Macao into a Communist power.

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)? Rob Halford is the screamer behind Jethro Tull.

5. In 2010, what automaker rolled out its first ever series production electric car, the Leaf? Nissan. And it is one ugly car. Not a trivia fact, just an observation.

6. What mythical creature appeared in the production logo at the end of the quiz show Jeopardy! from 1984 to 1994? The symbol for Merv Griffin Enterprises was--go figure-- a griffin.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these movies? The Age of Innocence, Anchorman 2, Moonrise Kingdom, Pete's Dragon, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz, The Ring. Each features a lighthouse as an important plot point. Feel free to use this list and hold a Lighthouse Film Festival this summer. Project it on the side of a lighthouse. See if I care.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. The new book by French economist Thomas Piketty recalls the title of an 1867 text as it considers the implications of what "in the Twenty-First Century"?

2. The 1st and 4th top-grossing romantic comedies of the 1990s--one released in 1990 and the other in 1999--both starred what pair of leads?

3. What are you shopping for if you've bought russets, fingerlings, and Yukon Golds?

4. What country was Mohammed Mossadegh leading in 1953 when U.S and British intelligence organized his ouster?

5. No Canadian team has won the Stanley Cup since Montreal in 1993. What's the only Canadian team to make it to the finals twice since then, though they've never won the Cup in their franchise history?

6. Of the digits 0 through 9, which is by far the last to make its first appearance in a decimal expansion of pi?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these biblical figures? Abel, Cain, Jehoshaphat, Joshua, Samuel, and Seth.

Have at it!
  #57  
Old 10 June 2014, 12:31 PM
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2. The 1st and 4th top-grossing romantic comedies of the 1990s--one released in 1990 and the other in 1999--both starred what pair of leads?

Guessing Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan

3. What are you shopping for if you've bought russets, fingerlings, and Yukon Golds?

Potatoes

4. What country was Mohammed Mossadegh leading in 1953 when U.S and British intelligence organized his ouster?

Iran?

6. Of the digits 0 through 9, which is by far the last to make its first appearance in a decimal expansion of pi?

0 Sadly, I know about the first 40 digits of pi.
  #58  
Old 10 June 2014, 12:40 PM
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What the heck, Ken?

1. What novelist is the subject of 1999's biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote? The Australian bio became an American hit last year when the Disney movie Saving Mr. Banks was SORT OF based on it.

...and the novelist is? (Well, it's P.L. Travers, but it would be nice if it appeared in the answer.)

4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)? Rob Halford is the screamer behind Jethro Tull.

Or possibly Judas Priest. Ian Anderson is the frontman of Jethro Tull.

Sloppy week?
  #59  
Old 10 June 2014, 12:45 PM
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2. The 1st and 4th top-grossing romantic comedies of the 1990s--one released in 1990 and the other in 1999--both starred what pair of leads? Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan?

3. What are you shopping for if you've bought russets, fingerlings, and Yukon Golds? Potatoes

5. No Canadian team has won the Stanley Cup since Montreal in 1993. What's the only Canadian team to make it to the finals twice since then, though they've never won the Cup in their franchise history? WAG - Calgary Flames?

6. Of the digits 0 through 9, which is by far the last to make its first appearance in a decimal expansion of pi? WAG - 5?
  #60  
Old 10 June 2014, 12:52 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
4. Rob Halford, with his famed four-octave vocal range, is best known for fronting what rock band since 1969 (aside from a hiatus during the 1990s)? Rob Halford is the screamer behind Jethro Tull.
Dang, that'll come as big news to Ian Anderson. Actually the correct answer IS Judas Priest.

Erg, spanked by mg
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. The new book by French economist Thomas Piketty recalls the title of an 1867 text as it considers the implications of what "in the Twenty-First Century"?
Wealth Inequality
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
2. The 1st and 4th top-grossing romantic comedies of the 1990s--one released in 1990 and the other in 1999--both starred what pair of leads?
Yeah, agree with Nick
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
3. What are you shopping for if you've bought russets, fingerlings, and Yukon Golds?
again, agree with Nick
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
4. What country was Mohammed Mossadegh leading in 1953 when U.S and British intelligence organized his ouster?
Once more, agree with Nick
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
5. No Canadian team has won the Stanley Cup since Montreal in 1993. What's the only Canadian team to make it to the finals twice since then, though they've never won the Cup in their franchise history?
Vancouver?
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these biblical figures? Abel, Cain, Jehoshaphat, Joshua, Samuel, and Seth.
They each are depicted as speaking with an angel?
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