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  #1  
Old 03 January 2013, 10:44 PM
CenTex CenTex is offline
 
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Default Stupid pet questions

I know there used to be a thread, but it must have rolled off.

My SPQ is this: have any of you successfully toilet trained your cat? I don't mean with a litter box, I mean the procelain throne.

If so, how was the process? We have adopted a cat and I was considering potty training it, especially because our dog considers what comes out of the back of the cat to be "tasty morsels."

TIA for your help!
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  #2  
Old 08 January 2013, 06:31 PM
StillandSilent StillandSilent is offline
 
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I haven't tried it, but my neighbors did. They bought the kit and did everything according to the instructions. Their female cat caught on quickly and used the toilet no problem, but the male continually pooped in front of the toilet, so the abandoned the plan. I've also heard that it's hard for cats to generalize one toilet to another, so if you plan on traveling, it could be a problem.

That said, I've heard of plenty of people doing it sucessfully.
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  #3  
Old 07 February 2013, 05:45 AM
Venus Venus is offline
 
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Here's a stupid pet question for you. One I should probably know the answer to since I've had cats for 10 years. My first 2 cats were not bug chasers, so when a bug got in i could douse it in Raid and then let the thing die without worrying. But new kitten Vidia is both a chaser and eater and now that it's coming into bug season again I don't know how to kill them. There's a flying german in my kitchen but if i Raid it and it hits the ground Vidia will eat it.
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  #4  
Old 07 February 2013, 02:37 PM
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GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
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A mix of a bit of detergent, some vinegar and water in a spray bottle should knock it down (or even kill it) long enough for you (or Vidia) to get it. There shouldn't be enough soap to be an issue, especially if you use a non-toxic soap. Or, better yet, start with just vinegar and water in the spray bottle.
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  #5  
Old 07 February 2013, 04:12 PM
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Morrigan Morrigan is offline
 
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Def. vinegar & water.

And to the above toilet training cat: a friend trained her cat to do it. She used a metal baking pan (one of the flimsy one use ones), then cut a hole in the center and gradually cut the hole bigger (well, she probably used multiple pans) until the cat was perched on the toilet.
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  #6  
Old 07 February 2013, 07:12 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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I would not use detergent on anything a kitty might put in her mouth. $700 spent on Mabel's emergency vet visit and pet poison control call taught me that even a very small amount of detergent can have a very nasty effect on a kitty. (She got some on her paws--I rinsed them, but apparently not well enough. She had to be in intensive care overnight because she got fluid in her lungs. She went home with heavy duty narcotics because the detergent can cause extensive ulcers throughout the digestive tract. I never knew how dangerous it was until that happened).
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  #7  
Old 12 February 2013, 11:43 PM
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DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Venus View Post
There's a flying german in my kitchen .
Call Snoopy.
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  #8  
Old 13 February 2013, 01:45 AM
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Jackson Galaxy has some thoughts about toilet training cats.
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  #9  
Old 13 February 2013, 06:13 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
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We tried toilet training Serenity, but found we weren't home enough in the later stages. She was fine when there was still enough litter in the bowl (we had a bowl that fit into the toilet), but when we got to the stage where there was little/no letter and a hole in the bowl, she started using the bathtub instead.

We weren't home enough to catch her in the tub and correct the behaviour. So we gave up. She still pees in the tub sometimes, when she feels her litter needs scooping or changing (she's probably right), but as long as she doesn't poop in the tub, I don't care.
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  #10  
Old 13 February 2013, 06:20 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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Even pooping in the tub is better than pooping on, say, the carpet or the bed.

Someone once asked me how to stop her cat from peeing in the tub. The cat wasn't peeing anywhere else outside the litter box. I told her not to mess with the status quo.
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  #11  
Old 13 February 2013, 06:27 PM
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Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
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I hear that Lainie. I had a cat who just didn't like cat litter. His preferred spot to urinate was the vinyl floor in the kitchen. While I didn't like this, I knew that if I did something to discourage this behavior, he would find some place much worse, and more difficult to clean.

My advice to anyone who want a cat to stop urinating in the wrong place is: 1) See the vet, 2) make sure there aren't any issues with the litter box 3)make sure you know where the cats second choice will be before you discourage them from urinating in a particular place.
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  #12  
Old 13 February 2013, 10:22 PM
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Latiam Latiam is offline
 
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My dad was changing the litter boxes and the one in the bedroom was empty. Little One scraped every last tiny piece of litter that had gone through her scratches in the liner into a pile in the centre of the box, and then peed on it. Dad wanted to tell her off but he was too amused. Plus she had really, really tried.

Can anyone think of why she is suddenly afraid of my coat when I come in? Her hackles rise and she hides, and yet if I take her outside in the same coat she rubs up against my legs for petting. It's a long coat, but not new.
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  #13  
Old 13 February 2013, 10:34 PM
CenTex CenTex is offline
 
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Based on several things, I have decided to abandon the potty training, but I have new question. How do you train a cat?

I don't mean "sit" and "stay" but getting him to not scratch on the furniture, and to not bite and scratch the family.
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  #14  
Old 13 February 2013, 10:47 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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Ah. So you're new to cat "ownership," eh CenTex? There are things you can do about all of those things, but you should temper your expectations. I used to say that the best you can expect is to train a cat to not do certain things while you're looking at them. (And even then, you might get a cat who will make a point of doing them while you're looking at them. . . .) For biting and scratching, my approach is to try to do the socialization the cat might not have gotten as a kitten. So if he bites or scratches, make a loud (high pitched, not scary) "Ow!" sound and withdraw your attention from the cat--put him down, turn your back, whatever.

It occurs to me as well that if you're new to cat keeping, you might not know the signs that a cat is getting agitated or overstimulated. If you miss those signs, then it's not really the cat's fault that he has to escalate his communication from the more subtle to the more overt. (I.e., if he's been telling you in cat to back off for over a minute, and you keep riling him up until he swats at you, then it's more on you to learn to read the signs than it is to teach him not to swat.)

As far as scratching furniture, many scratching posts/pads/etc. has been my solution. If the cat scratches something he's not supposed to, remove him to one of the scratching posts. Lather, rinse, repeat.

Last edited by erwins; 13 February 2013 at 10:57 PM.
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  #15  
Old 13 February 2013, 10:59 PM
CenTex CenTex is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
Ah. So you're new to cat "ownership," eh CenTex? There are things you can do about all of those things, but you should temper your expectations. I used to say that the best you can expect is to train a cat to not do certain things while you're looking at them. (And even then, you might get a cat who will make a point of doing them while you're looking at them. . . .)
Yes, yes I am. My daughter really wanted a cat. There was a litter born in our neighborhood to a female that was supposed to be spayed. He took up residence in another neighbor's garage, and so we "adopted" him from that neighbor. Original owner was fine with it as they were trying to get rid of them anyway. He is sort of a rescue, except he never was actually in a shelter.

He is really sweet and cute, purrs at the drop of a hat, and will "knead biscuits" with his paws. He gets along well with our dog, but he can be ornery.

ETA: He hasn't swatted or appeared agitated so much as rough playfulness. He is playing, but it hurts!
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  #16  
Old 13 February 2013, 11:08 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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Oh, yeah. Kitten play can be brutal. It's like the come equipped with needle teeth and tiny scalpel claws. It's important that you institute a rule that no one plays with the cat with hands. Toys: great. Hands: a recipe for long-term problems. If the kitten starts playing with someone's hand, they should just go find a toy and re-direct the play toward the toy.
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  #17  
Old 13 February 2013, 11:38 PM
blucanary blucanary is offline
 
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You need to get him some toys he can "play" with. He's learning honing his predator instincts. A stick with a ribbon attached is a good interactive toy.
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  #18  
Old 13 February 2013, 11:45 PM
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TallGeekyGirl TallGeekyGirl is offline
 
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I've heard that double-sided tape placed on the corners of chairs and such where a cat might take up scratching can help keep them from doing it. They don't like the sticky, so if you keep up the tape, they'll soon learn that the chairs aren't fun to touch.

I can't vouch for how well it works, though. I didn't know about the trick when Ash was a kitten, and my chair has felt his wrath.
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  #19  
Old 14 February 2013, 12:30 AM
Barbara
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
As far as scratching furniture, many scratching posts/pads/etc. has been my solution. If the cat scratches something he's not supposed to, remove him to one of the scratching posts. Lather, rinse, repeat.
In addition to erwin's excellent advice, I've found changing the texture of the furniture the kitties like to scratch gets them to leave the furniture alone. I my house, I accomplish that by positioning throws over the sides of couches.
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  #20  
Old 14 February 2013, 02:50 AM
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Latiam Latiam is offline
 
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We do withdraw when Little One bites or scratches, but she doesn't really do either, at least to me. She will grab at my hand with her teeth, or swat at me with her claws out, but I follow the advice of a show I saw a long time ago and freeze. This is the exact opposite of what she is trying to get - prey would struggle, if she's trying to hurt you you would react - and every time I do it, without fail, she stops. Then I warn her, "No claws," or "Don't bite," and if she does it again I stop petting her, which annoys her but she has learned that only swats with claws in are okay. She will occasionally try to bite my hand, but it seems to be a game, because as soon as I freeze with her teeth barely touching it she sits back with a contented expression and wants me to pet her some more.
I do agree with pissed off Cat. If you have ignored more subtle hints they will swat you or bite you.
They are perfectly capable of learning which things they aren't supposed to scratch. She gets a few treats every morning for using her scratching thing, which I got her to use with techniques from B.F. Skinner. Now she only scratches what she isn't supposed to to get yelled at and she is already racing upstairs.
I recently discovered that she lurves having a ping-pong ball thrown down the hall. You should give it a try.
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