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  #441  
Old 09 October 2018, 04:21 PM
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Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by kitap View Post
Pudding for Americans is a sweet dessert similar (I gather) to blancmange. Or a creamier mousse.
Not blancmange, which I understand is something molded, which holds its shape when unmolded. Pudding won't do that.

Mousse is airier than pudding, and lighter. This is probably the most similar.

Seaboe
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  #442  
Old 09 October 2018, 04:32 PM
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Wouldn't custard be the closest British equivalent to American pudding?
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  #443  
Old 09 October 2018, 04:38 PM
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Pretty much. Especially the British powdered/instant custards (such as Bird's brand) which are thickened with corn starch (cornflour) and are similar to American instant pudding mixes.
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  #444  
Old 09 October 2018, 05:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
Pull off tops are still common enough that I think someone could figure out through extrapolation what the line means.
Really, my main question was "Does pudding still come packaged that way?" The bit about young people understand that line was meant as something of a joke.
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  #445  
Old 09 October 2018, 05:22 PM
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It would appear so, but I don't know how common that is.

ETA: Or it was until recently. Both Amazon and Walmart show it as out of stock with no predicted availability date.
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  #446  
Old 09 October 2018, 05:28 PM
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I don't think they are likely packaged in individual size cans anymore in this country, anyway. It was pretty common for kids to cut themselves on the lids or inner rim of the cans. I can remember cutting my tongue on one.

The Hunts Snack Pack ads even focused on warning kids not to lick the lids.

https://www.metv.com/lists/the-hunts...-our-childhood

Which is a fairly unrealistic expectation for at least younger kids.

I did see somewhere that Sam's Club sells the giant cans of pudding like the one on the Walking Dead. But no pull top ones.
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  #447  
Old 11 October 2018, 02:11 AM
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I've noticed that in major storms like hurricanes and tornadoes, gas stations always seem to sustain significant damage to the roof over the pumping stations. Is there a particular design flaw to them?
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  #448  
Old 11 October 2018, 03:20 AM
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They're nothing but inexpensive sheet metal over a structural support frame. It would not surprise me to learn that they're actually designed to do that, to protect the support structure itself.
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  #449  
Old 11 October 2018, 03:29 AM
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Heck, even here in the desert, gas station canopies have been known to blow over. Of course, we have 70 MPH winds without rain.
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  #450  
Old 14 October 2018, 09:12 PM
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Do American cabinet members (the ones Trump appoints) not have to be elected politicians? (Elected to congress or senate?)

I should probably have worked this out long ago, and I'd sort of wondered before, but I started thinking about it again after reading that Trump had described Jim Mattis (Secretary of State for Defense) as "sort of a Democrat" and looking him up to see whether he was actually a Democrat, assuming that he'd just be a Republican that Trump didn't like. But can't see any indication that he's an elected representative at all...
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  #451  
Old 14 October 2018, 09:41 PM
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Indeed they are not. The President nominates the members of the cabinet, almost always from members of their own party, and the Senate merely confirms the nominations. They are almost never sitting members of Congress and if they are they will give up their seats (to be filled by someone else).
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  #452  
Old 14 October 2018, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Do American cabinet members (the ones Trump appoints) not have to be elected politicians? (Elected to congress or senate?)

I should probably have worked this out long ago, and I'd sort of wondered before, but I started thinking about it again after reading that Trump had described Jim Mattis (Secretary of State for Defense) as "sort of a Democrat" and looking him up to see whether he was actually a Democrat, assuming that he'd just be a Republican that Trump didn't like. But can't see any indication that he's an elected representative at all...
Not only do they not have to be elected to the Senate or H of R, they shouldn't be. I believe it's against the law, but in any case it would be very wrong to be in Congress and be a Cabinet member at the same time. The Cabinet is part of the Executive branch of the government (i.e. the President's team) and Congress is the Legislative branch. To be part of both upsets the checks and balances. (An exception of sorts is the Vice President, who is President of the Senate, but has little real power in that role. Vice President is, of course, an elected position.) If a congressman or senator would be appointed, he or she would quit Congress.

BTW, Mattis is Secretary of Defense, not Secretary of State for Defense.
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  #453  
Old 14 October 2018, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
BTW, Mattis is Secretary of Defense, not Secretary of State for Defense.
Yes, sorry - I got muddled up with the UK title for the position, and the article I was reading only described him as "defense secretary" rather than giving the actual title.

I guess the Cabinet in the USA has a different function from the Cabinet in the UK, then. Our Cabinet is still appointed by the PM, but she chooses from elected MPs (again, from her party, unless it's a coalition).
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  #454  
Old 14 October 2018, 10:14 PM
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It would be unconstitutional:
Article I, Section 6, paragraph 2:
Quote:
no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.
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  #455  
Old 15 October 2018, 01:27 AM
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i don't know if the function is different. The Cabinet advises the President; also, each cabinet member is the top administrator in their respective department.
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  #456  
Old 15 October 2018, 09:42 AM
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It might be because you have an actual president, so your cabinet are advisers to the Head of State, whereas in the UK they're advisers to the Head of Government. (Our Head of State is the Queen). So in our case, they're still part of the legislature rather than the executive. It sounds as though constitutionally, the president is more like a (politicised) part of the civil service - which I guess is why he's so keen to kick out anybody who worked there under previous presidents. When people go on about the "deep state" they usually seem to be talking about civil servants (if they're talking about anything coherent at all).
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  #457  
Old 15 October 2018, 12:30 PM
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The President is both head of state and head of government. There’s a reason ours is sometimes referred to as the imperial presidency. And the expression didn’t originate with Trump.
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  #458  
Old 15 October 2018, 01:43 PM
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And the President is in no way part of the civil service. No elected or appointed official is. The whole point of the US civil service is to have a (theoretically) apolitical hiring system.
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  #459  
Old 15 October 2018, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
So in our case, they're still part of the legislature rather than the executive.
Actually I was wrong about this - the Cabinet in the UK is considered part of the executive as well (i.e. part of the Government rather than Parliament). Wikipedia says:

Quote:
Historically, the apparent merger of the executive and the legislature, with a powerful Prime Minister drawn from the largest party in parliament and usually with a safe majority, led theorists to contend that the separation of powers is not applicable to the United Kingdom. However, in recent years it does seem to have been adopted as a necessary part of the UK constitution.
It still seems weirder to me that such powerful positions could be entirely unelected, though, whether the people in them stay as part of the legislature during their terms or not.
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  #460  
Old 15 October 2018, 08:33 PM
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Meh. What seems weird to me (and I’m being totally serious here) is that you all use the word constitution to refer to a sort of vague, conceptual understanding of how your government functions, based on precedent and the common law rather than any one document with amendments.

Consider that, since the President and a majority in Congress need not come from the same party (and the idea of a coalition government is right out), having congresspersons from the leading party fill top executive branch posts would be about as effective as having the runner up for the Presidency serve as Vice President. Which we dabbled with for a time.
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