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  #41  
Old 04 August 2014, 06:37 PM
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If Plurabelle's husband was born in the Netherlands before they came to Canada that had to have been somewhere between 1955-1960ish so not really a time frame most would associate with arriving in Canada after the occupation of the Netherlands. Likely over the years the children were told stories about what life was like for their parents during and after the war and it's all gotten mixed up and timelines confused.
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  #42  
Old 04 August 2014, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
From what I understand the boom happened in the 50 and 60s, so his parents would have been there through the first decade of it. According to Wiki, the boom was so big that they were actively encouraging people to immigrate into the Netherlands.
If we were right with the late 50s, I can't make that total ten years. Some years, though.
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  #43  
Old 04 August 2014, 07:06 PM
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We have some similar garbled history with SO's grandparents. Part of her grandmother's family were in a concentration camp in Poland during the war. Her grandmother was chosen to get the one set of false papers they could get. Her grandfather's family were also in the camps, but he was hiding out and fighting as a Polish partisan., at one point he was captured and put in a camp, but they somehow got him out. They went from Poland into Germany and then into France. They were in France after the war, and later joined other family in NYC. The timeline of when they left Poland and when they got to France, and how it all happened is pretty tough to pin down. Understandably, they don't/didn't talk about it much.

There's an interview someone did where they tell their story, which is on VHS tape. The grandmother has it, but doesn't want anyone to watch it or copy it. I totally understand her wanting to control that, but I hope the tape lasts long enough to be copied when she's gone. It's important just as oral history, but also because the effects of what happened play out pretty dramatically in the family dynamics, and some of those dynamics have passed down through the generations.

It can be hard to ferret that stuff out, but it can, in some cases anyway, help to explain things. (And not always the way you'd expect. SO's grandmother is a very bitter and closed person, while her sister, who was actually in the camp, is very sweet and open. From having heard a bit of the story, I think I understand why.)
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  #44  
Old 04 August 2014, 07:18 PM
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erwins, my own family back story is similarly difficult to untangle. I grew up hearing my father's narrative, but it was only as an adult that I started to realize there were 'holes' in the stories he told. Over many years talking to my aunt, uncles, great aunts, great uncles and my mother I have slowly pieced together what I believe is an accurate picture. It is starkly different from my father's narrative and explains most of the tension between my father and his siblings. As an added bonus is also explains a lot about my parent's divorce.
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  #45  
Old 05 August 2014, 02:02 PM
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Mine's not.

My father wrote his autobiography, my aunt did a lot of genealogy on that side, my friend did even more for me, and the WWII generation of my father's family (the men, anyway) wrote a collective reminiscence. My mother's family genealogy is known back to the 17th century (the farm at Umea is still in the family).

Seaboe
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  #46  
Old 05 August 2014, 02:12 PM
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You are quite lucky in that, Seaboe. My parents broke up when I was young, then my mom died a few years later, and my dad refused to ever say anything about their time together beyond vague generalities. Luckily, my step mom told me some things, which made a LOT more of my life make sense, like why my dad has such trust issues, why my parents broke up, and why my mom ended up with such a jerk of a second husband.
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  #47  
Old 15 December 2017, 06:11 AM
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My FIL was dead and my mother in law really didn't make sense when I met them. I really don't know the truth except for what my husband tells me. They were poor and very religious; my MIL had 14 siblings.
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  #48  
Old 24 December 2017, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
If Plurabelle's husband was born in the Netherlands before they came to Canada that had to have been somewhere between 1955-1960ish so not really a time frame most would associate with arriving in Canada after the occupation of the Netherlands. Likely over the years the children were told stories about what life was like for their parents during and after the war and it's all gotten mixed up and timelines confused.
I finally got an answer - my MIL was forced to work in a bake shop under the Nazis. She was ~14. My FIL was in the military and served in the Pacific.

My husband wasn't born until the Nazis were long gone, but for whatever reason, his parents talked shit about the Nazis a lot. Apparently, it all blurred together.
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  #49  
Old 21 May 2018, 07:31 PM
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It ended up going to a lawsuit, but we won. Not that we really won anything-- but after we documented the 5 pieces of furniture we had from my MIL's house, my husband and I are no longer accused of anything. Thank God.

My husband and I are still the only people who visit our MIL/motber. I am so sick about it because she is so lonely, so demeted, the ony time she seems happy is when we take her on a walk to see the aquarium.
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