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  #61  
Old 29 March 2014, 09:13 PM
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erwins erwins is online now
 
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It's not as bad as that article makes it sound. Plaintiffs will have to prove that the particular animal was dangerous. The court did not impose strict liability on all horse owners.

http://www.ctlawtribune.com/home/id=...20140229170414
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  #62  
Old 29 March 2014, 09:28 PM
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Little Pink Pill Little Pink Pill is offline
 
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That's good to know, thanks for that link.
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  #63  
Old 30 March 2014, 01:01 AM
catty5nutz catty5nutz is offline
 
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I don't know a lot about horses, but they seem to be high-strung, nervy creatures. Also, smart and very good at reading people and their body language. They seem to know if someone isn't confident around them, and they will act up around these people.

I had an uncle who bred horses. When we went to see them, I was always being warned about being careful around them - not to walk around behind a horse; not to turn your back, not to make any sudden moves. And most of all, not to touch them without permission from the owner or handler. Even then, you should extend a hand for them to sniff [remembering to curl up your fingers] before patting them.

Actually, these warnings can apply pretty much to any living creature. The smallest creature can be stroppy, dangerous and vicious if they are frightened, threatened or no handled properly.

Years ago, I did a vet nurse's course. One of the things we had to do in the final exam was to sex either baby mice or baby rats - they weren't newborns. They had their fur, their eyes were open, and they were quite active, although still with their mums. It was the mice that almost everyone found more difficult to handle. They would fight and bite when you tried to lift their tails to see whether they were male or female. Almost everyone round up being bitten at least once by the mice when we were being taught how to handle and sex them. The rats, despite their much larger size, and a bad reputation in popular culture were much more amenable to being handled. Almost all the students, including myself, ended up going with the rats when having to choose either rats or mice to sex.

The hardest part of the exam was actually trying to get a cat's heartbeat. The cat wasn't against being handled - far from it. It liked the attention, and purred throughout the entire time it was being handled by the various students. It purred so loudly in fact, that almost no-one was actually able to hear its hearbeat!
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  #64  
Old 30 March 2014, 02:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catty5nutz View Post
I don't know a lot about horses, but they seem to be high-strung, nervy creatures. Also, smart and very good at reading people and their body language. They seem to know if someone isn't confident around them, and they will act up around these people.

I had an uncle who bred horses. When we went to see them, I was always being warned about being careful around them - not to walk around behind a horse; not to turn your back, not to make any sudden moves. And most of all, not to touch them without permission from the owner or handler. Even then, you should extend a hand for them to sniff [remembering to curl up your fingers] before patting them.
I've always felt a little sorry for most horses, since they are domesticated animals that are expected to behave submissively around any pretty much any one who uses them, rather than being the sole companion of a few loving owners. I've been around horses that were sweethearts, and yet they had had multiple homes before they were 3 years old, because of behaviors like choppy gaits or balkiness. If people rejected them because of these benign behaviors, what do you think happens to the animals with more severe behavior problems? Even the best horse can still get passed from owner to owner, because they are expensive to care for and yet, they still have some monetary value, especially when they are still young. It seems that it's a lucky few animals that get to spend their lives in loving homes with people who give them the care and training they deserve.
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  #65  
Old 30 March 2014, 03:25 AM
catty5nutz catty5nutz is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
I've always felt a little sorry for most horses, since they are domesticated animals that are expected to behave submissively around any pretty much any one who uses them, rather than being the sole companion of a few loving owners. I've been around horses that were sweethearts, and yet they had had multiple homes before they were 3 years old, because of behaviors like choppy gaits or balkiness. If people rejected them because of these benign behaviors, what do you think happens to the animals with more severe behavior problems? Even the best horse can still get passed from owner to owner, because they are expensive to care for and yet, they still have some monetary value, especially when they are still young. It seems that it's a lucky few animals that get to spend their lives in loving homes with people who give them the care and training they deserve.
Indeed. Like most domestic animals, horses were domesticated because they were useful to humans. That didn't mean that we necessarily understood them. And one of the things that we failed to understand was that while they had been tamed, there was still a creature there with strong instincts that could never be entirely suppressed. Also, as with any living creature, you have to put in a lot to get something back. And I am not talking money, but a lot of time, a lot of patience a lot of knowledge, and the confidence to be the boss without being heavy-handed about it.

I admit that my only real experience with animals has been with cats, which a lot smaller and easier to handle than horses. We have adopted a couple of cats over the years that were abused in previous homes, and it takes a long time to bring them around. I suspect that horses are far, fare more difficult than a cat.
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  #66  
Old 30 March 2014, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by catty5nutz View Post
The hardest part of the exam was actually trying to get a cat's heartbeat. The cat wasn't against being handled - far from it. It liked the attention, and purred throughout the entire time it was being handled by the various students. It purred so loudly in fact, that almost no-one was actually able to hear its hearbeat!
And that would be why the only thing we have ever learned about my Chloe's heart in fifteen years is that she's got one. Probably.

Horses, though; they're herbivores and domesticated, but that doesn't mean they don't have personalities and moods.
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  #67  
Old 30 March 2014, 12:07 PM
catty5nutz catty5nutz is offline
 
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Horses, though; they're herbivores and domesticated, but that doesn't mean they don't have personalities and moods.
I have heard that horses can be quite quirky and are full of character.
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  #68  
Old 30 March 2014, 07:39 PM
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Mister Ed

My horse, Lady, was old and cranky when I got her. But when I was having very bad days in my teen years, I could climb up on her bare back and she'd let me just lie there as long as I needed to. Of course, this is also the same horse who deliberately ran me under a tree and knocked me off of her, ruining my back. They have quirks and personalities just like any other animal. Lumping them in all together, especially as vicious, is stupid.

Although I have to say I find ponies to be meaner than horses. I had one try to kick my face in once.
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  #69  
Old 08 May 2014, 08:15 PM
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Mister Ed Update

Connecticut Senate Clarifies Horses Not Inherently Dangerous.
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