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  #21  
Old 15 February 2013, 03:36 PM
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I know it's all ok and stuff. I still made sure that someone would pick up my kids from school if anything weird happens today, like a meteor hitting the bridge that is my only link to the mainland.
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  #22  
Old 15 February 2013, 04:49 PM
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I have seen scattered reports that claim that "Russian Air Defense" fired on (and possibly even hit) the meteor, but I'm not buying that without a lot more information.
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  #23  
Old 15 February 2013, 05:07 PM
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According to one article I read, the meteor was going about 33,000 mph when it entered the atmosphere. While it certainly would have slowed down, I doubt it would have slowed down enough to be tracked and fired upon by any known technology. The current record for human flight is probably somewhere less than mach 4, meaning the meteor would have been traveling somewhere between 5 and 10 times as fast as the fastest aircraft.
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  #24  
Old 15 February 2013, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Temple View Post
Great, now it's Russia's turn to have people with all sorts of strange abilities.
Or be taken by a strangle alien parasite

And I see it's brought the Tunguska event of 1908 back into the the news with it.
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  #25  
Old 15 February 2013, 06:22 PM
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This article from the UK Telegraph has lots of technical information. Apparently the meteorite was initially travelling at 10-13 miles per second when it hit the atmosphere and the sonic boom took two and a half minutes to reach the ground.


This article from Nature.com explains why the meteorite went undetected until it hit the atmoshpere and started ionising gasses. Scary stuff.
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  #26  
Old 15 February 2013, 06:30 PM
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NASA says the meteor was was 15 meters in size before entering the atmosphere, and that it appears to have been moving north to south, the opposite direction from asteroid 2012 DA14.
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  #27  
Old 16 February 2013, 03:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
The current record for human flight is probably somewhere less than mach 4
Nitpick - while the fastest jet-powered aircraft (the SR-71) does have a maximum speed of under Mach 4 (Mach 3.3), the rocket-powered X-15 achieved Mach 6.72 on its fastest flight. Also consider the orbital and/or reentry speeds of the Space Shuttle (almost four times faster than the X-15 during reentry.)

Last edited by Meka; 16 February 2013 at 03:38 AM.
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  #28  
Old 16 February 2013, 04:49 AM
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I believe the Apollo missions returning from the moon were going even faster on re-entry (I'm seeing a figure of 24,900 mph), but of course that's kind of a loose definition of 'flying.' (The Apollo capsule did generate a small amount of lift, enough to steer a bit, but of course they weren't under power at that point.)
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  #29  
Old 16 February 2013, 01:54 PM
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I love how most of these tough Siberians in the videos are mostly like, "What's this? Another damn thing besides the cold we have to deal with? Oh well. It figures." It's just one more thing.
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  #30  
Old 16 February 2013, 01:59 PM
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In Soviet Russia... Space Explores You!
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  #31  
Old 16 February 2013, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
I love how most of these tough Siberians in the videos are mostly like, "What's this? Another damn thing besides the cold we have to deal with? Oh well. It figures." It's just one more thing.
There's a cracked article about that.

http://www.cracked.com/quick-fixes/5...t-give-f2340k/
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  #32  
Old 16 February 2013, 03:24 PM
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Even though it is a coincidence, the juxtaposition of this meteor with the flyby makes me a lot more aware that we live on a little planet surrounded by a lot of other objects. Usually, the idea of being hit by meteor is used as an example of long odds. No one, in fact, seems to have been hit by it--but it may have just become a very bad example.

Ali
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  #33  
Old 16 February 2013, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali Infree View Post
Usually, the idea of being hit by meteor is used as an example of long odds.
Unless your name is Dr. Evil.
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  #34  
Old 16 February 2013, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali Infree View Post
Even though it is a coincidence, the juxtaposition of this meteor with the flyby makes me a lot more aware that we live on a little planet surrounded by a lot of other objects. Usually, the idea of being hit by meteor is used as an example of long odds. No one, in fact, seems to have been hit by it--but it may have just become a very bad example.
"Asteroids are nature's way of asking 'So how's that space program coming along?'"
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  #35  
Old 16 February 2013, 09:27 PM
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The drivers' videos I understood immediately. If they've still got a few more minutes of their commute in that traffic then an asteroid hitting the city is the least of their worries.
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  #36  
Old 18 February 2013, 05:05 AM
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It's interesting, although completely meaningless and useless information, that the three most massive objects known to enter the atmosphere over the past few hundred years have all hit Siberia. (Tunguska 1908, Sikhote-Alin 1947, and this one.) I know it's one of the biggest targets but, seriously, give them a break!
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  #37  
Old 18 February 2013, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
It's interesting, although completely meaningless and useless information, that the three most massive objects known to enter the atmosphere over the past few hundred years have all hit Siberia. (Tunguska 1908, Sikhote-Alin 1947, and this one.) I know it's one of the biggest targets but, seriously, give them a break!
'Known' is a huge qualifier here. 70% of the surface is ocean, and a relatively small portion of the oceans have traffic at any given time to notice such an event. Siberia represents a substantial portion of the surface land area of the Earth, something between 5-10%. An event like these would likely go unnoticed in all or much of Antarctica, Greenland and the other major Arctic islands (especially in winter), the Sahara, the Australian interior, and the Amazon rain forest. However, even given that, it is not so much that we might have missed several impacts, but that the impacts that have been noticed have been in northern Asia only, rather being shared with Africa, the Americas, the rest of Eurasia, etc.
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  #38  
Old 18 February 2013, 04:41 PM
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I would think that given technology, events like this would have been noticed by either satellites or even older technology, seismographs, no matter where they occurred in the last 50 years. However, given that this is supposedly a 1 in a 100 year event, maybe they just haven't happened.
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  #39  
Old 18 February 2013, 05:56 PM
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a Tweet I really liked about this was

"I can't wait to see the sword Putin forges from this"

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  #40  
Old 18 February 2013, 07:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
I would think that given technology, events like this would have been noticed by either satellites or even older technology, seismographs, no matter where they occurred in the last 50 years. However, given that this is supposedly a 1 in a 100 year event, maybe they just haven't happened.
There are a lot of problems with this.

Seismographs - the earth impacts of this recent event was almost certainly not significant enough to raise any notice from seismologists unless they specifically looked for it knowing precisely when to look. Most of the energy was dissipated in the air, and the object broke into numerous pieces, each of which would have had its proportionate share of the overall energy. The biggest part seems to have hit the lake with the circular hole in the ice - the water would have absorbed and spread the energy without a seismologically significant trace. Most impacts would not be with a lake or land, however, but with the ocean, which would easily absorb and wash out the impact very quickly. And while substantial events can be registered across the globe, more moderate occurrences require active nearby equipment. Of course, the greatest concentration of seismographs are located in the various tectonic hotspots, not a rather quiet (geologically) area like central and western Siberia.

Satellites - most 'see' nothing, as they are relay stations for communications. Even those which do surveys, quite a few are aimed away from the earth for astronomy and would not see such a tiny chip as this rock was unless it passed within a few miles and within the field of vision, and even then, it would at best be a blur to a device dedicated to viewing objects with little to no transit across the field of view. Those aimed toward the Earth would generally survey only a fairly small portion of the Earth's surface, even collectively, at any given moment. Such earth-survey satellites would have to be viewing the precise location at the precise moment to catch anything.
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