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Old 22 May 2014, 07:19 PM
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Icon13 Levi Strauss CEO: Conserve water and stop washing your jeans

During a recent talk at Fortune's Brainstorm Green conference, Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh recommended that customers stop washing their jeans in order to conserve water.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...bergh/9371411/
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  #2  
Old 22 May 2014, 07:32 PM
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Bergh said he hasn't washed his jeans in a year.
How often does he wear said jeans? I'm assuming he has more than a few pairs. If I owned a jean company, I might have so many that I didn't have to wash my pants very often, either.

Quote:
"I have yet to get a skin disease or anything else," he said in a video of the talk posted by Fortune.
Personal hygiene isn't just about disease. It's also about being considerate to the olfactory senses of those around you. Dirty jeans have a particular odor.
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Old 22 May 2014, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Little Pink Pill View Post
How often does he wear said jeans? I'm assuming he has more than a few pairs. If I owned a jean company, I might have so many that I didn't have to wash my pants very often, either.
And how dirty does a CEO get his jeans with occasional wearing compared to blue collar workers in the "dirtier" trades. Remembering what my jeans were like after a concert, certain jobs or after responding to a fire as a volunteer makes me cringe to think of only wiping them off with a moist cloth.

I can see the sentiment if you are just sitting/standing around in them and not doing anything to soil them but doesn't work well for all cases.
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Old 22 May 2014, 08:20 PM
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If I sat on my rear in an office all day I wouldn't have to wash my jeans often either. Taking care of a toddler and a building a garden lead to all sorts of dirt and scents.
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Old 22 May 2014, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Aud 1 View Post
Taking care of a toddler and a building a garden lead to all sorts of dirt and scents.
Also being around dogs. Bouncy dogs who step in things.
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Old 22 May 2014, 09:24 PM
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It's clearly not practical advice for everyone, but the underlying sentiment of reducing the amount of laundry you do by getting multiple wears when possible out of a garment before washing is sound.

I have many things that I wear several times between washes. If it doesn't smell and I haven't spilled anything on it, I will usually wear it at least one more time. Jeans are definitely washed the least often, followed by sleepwear and then sweaters.
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Old 22 May 2014, 09:42 PM
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If I've taught my children nothing else, I've taught them that unless their clothing is stained there is no reason to put them in the laundry after one wearing (well obviously there are one or two exceptions to this rule). Nothing used to drive me crazier than seeing the same clothes go through the wash day after day. Not only does overdoing the washing waste water it's wearing out the clothes!
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Old 22 May 2014, 10:29 PM
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I generally wear underwear once and shirts twice (barring spillages / stains / unusual exertion / really hot and sweaty days or whatever). But I can wear jeans for months without washing them... again, unless they get covered in mud or something nasty gets spilled on them. I'd say I probably wear the same pair for at least a month at a time and I don't think it makes any difference at all.
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Old 22 May 2014, 10:39 PM
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As a general rule of thumb it's until the jeans stand on their own -- or until dw says, "No, ganz, that is not the rule in this house. Wash your stinkyass jeans."
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Old 22 May 2014, 10:44 PM
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If jeans have spandex in them, I can only wear them twice before they need to be washed (or at least gotten wet) because they stretch out and get too baggy. Non-spandexed jeans can go a minimum of 4 wearings before they go through the wash.

About a year or so ago, I cut way, way back on the amount of laundry detergent I use, and it seems that my clothes are experiencing less wear and tear. Could be my imagination, though.
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Old 23 May 2014, 11:21 AM
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I usually go at least a couple weeks between washing my jeans. However, I tend to wear pjs most of the time, and only wear the jeans when I leave the house. That doesn't happen every day and is almost always less than four hours.

I also don't shower every day. One just doesn't get very dirty/smelly spending most of her time at ease in a climate controlled environment.
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Old 23 May 2014, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by mags View Post
I also don't shower every day. One just doesn't get very dirty/smelly spending most of her time at ease in a climate controlled environment.
Washing too often dries out the skin, too.

My aunt and I had an interesting discussion about soap, too. Unless I've been doing something that makes me sweat or gets me dirty in other ways, I only use soap on what my aunt called "the stinky bits". Rinsing serves perfectly well to cleanse the non-stinky bits and helps prevent dry skin (which I abhor because it itches).

Seaboe
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Old 23 May 2014, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Washing too often dries out the skin, too.

My aunt and I had an interesting discussion about soap, too. Unless I've been doing something that makes me sweat or gets me dirty in other ways, I only use soap on what my aunt called "the stinky bits". Rinsing serves perfectly well to cleanse the non-stinky bits and helps prevent dry skin (which I abhor because it itches).

Seaboe
For many people, some of what might be included in 'the stinky bits' - i.e., the mucous membranes of the genitalia, generally the pink parts - should not be washed with soap. Soap tends to irritate the delicate tissues and kill friendly bacteria that hold yeasties and other unpleasant beasties in check. Between the labia for women and under the foreskin for men are usually cleansed just fine with a generous rinsing with clean water. I have read of people claiming these areas should NEVER be washed with soap, and one certainly does not need to wash there with soap, but I think it is more accurate to say that if one has been washing with soap there, one should watch for signs of problems with those areas and cut out the soaps, perfumey stuff, etc. if they show signs of irritation or infection.
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Old 24 May 2014, 03:29 PM
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My husband never washes his face with soap unless he gets something like grease on his face. He's extremely sensitive to soap, even the kind for sensitive skin.
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Old 26 May 2014, 02:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Washing too often dries out the skin, too.

My aunt and I had an interesting discussion about soap, too. Unless I've been doing something that makes me sweat or gets me dirty in other ways, I only use soap on what my aunt called "the stinky bits". Rinsing serves perfectly well to cleanse the non-stinky bits and helps prevent dry skin (which I abhor because it itches).

Seaboe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
My husband never washes his face with soap unless he gets something like grease on his face. He's extremely sensitive to soap, even the kind for sensitive skin.
My Dad and I do not respond well to soap, so for most of my life we have used a non soap cleanser. I grew up in Townsville in the tropics and Brisbane is in the subtropics. You have to do very little in these parts to get sweaty.
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Old 26 May 2014, 03:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
You have to do very little in these parts to get sweaty.
I visited Darwin about two years ago. I remember going outside and after walking a block down the street already being dripping with sweat.
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Old 26 May 2014, 03:43 AM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
I visited Darwin about two years ago. I remember going outside and after walking a block down the street already being dripping with sweat.
Well to be fair in Brisbane, and definately in Townsville, jeans are considered winter wear.

There are some things I wear more then once before washing. If it is something I only wear around the house or to walk to the shops, I will wear it more then once before washing. The clothes I going walking (for exercise) in I will wear more then once. But work clothes I only wear once before washing.
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Old 02 June 2014, 05:53 AM
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Studies on how often you have to actually wash garments have been undertaken by both the military and NASA (Mary Roach devotes a whole chapter to it in her recent Packing For Mars. and the gist of them do usually seem to be "Not nearly as often as you'd think."

When I was in Afghanistan it simply wasn't possible to change out your ACU (the outer shirt and cargo pants) everyday but as long as you changed your underwear, t-shirt, and socks (and I'm assuming bra for the females) the outer garments didn't get that funky. And that was in the dirtiest, sweatiest environment you could possibly be in.

I think cleanliness as it is practiced is largely a cultural fetish to some degree. I think culturally we are obsessed with cleanliness because up until the very recent past it was so important as basic hygiene was probably the single most important controllable factor in someone's overall health.

But it's not the Middle Ages or Dickensian London anymore. The vast majority of us aren't doing 16 hours of work tilling the back 40, taking a horse drawn cart home along a dirt road, to an dirt floor shack, defecating in a chamber pot before doing what little bathing we do in dirty water.

Is basic sanitation of self and clothing essential for health and just general social standards? Sure. Is it vitally necessary that a person that works a basic sit down office job in an air conditioned building in a modern city in a moderate climate waste gallons upon gallons of water on themselves and their clothing every day to maintain those basic standards? Hardly.
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Old 02 June 2014, 11:25 AM
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I wash my jeans when they can walk to the laundry room by themselves.

(Actually, I change them about every 3-4 days.)
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  #20  
Old 06 June 2014, 02:35 AM
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Shifty Eyes Oldest Known Pair of Pants Unearthed

Quote:
The pants, which date from 3,000 to 3,300 years ago, are tattered, but are surprisingly stylish, combining attractive form with function. Made out of wool, the trousers feature straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch.
http://news.discovery.com/history/ol...hed-140604.htm

3 millennia without a wash is long even for my standards. (But I would still give them a quick smell before assuming they needed one.)
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