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  #21  
Old 07 September 2017, 08:01 PM
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Depends on how you like your bagels, I prefer the less chewy version myself. But then I think Cheez Whiz on a cheese steak is a horrible thing to do to it, so I guess I'm anti proper regional named foods.
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  #22  
Old 07 September 2017, 08:18 PM
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Yes, I prefer provolone on my cheese steaks as well. Cheez Whiz is just all around horrible stuff.
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  #23  
Old 07 September 2017, 09:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
Wait, what? I thought boiling before baking was what made it a bagel. How else do you get the smooth exterior?
Most store bought bagels seem like torus shaped loafs of bread. They'll treat the "crust" before baking so that it has a slightly different consistency, but it's still not right. Dedicated bagel shops are better than that, but even they can't always seem to replicate it.

Some New Yorkers will claim there's more to it, like their tap water making it different, which is dubious. But it's true that most places outside of New York will lack the knowledge to make them as well.
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  #24  
Old 07 September 2017, 09:32 PM
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I rebelled against the idea of Cheez Whiz on a cheese steak for a long time. I wanted the provolone melted on the bun.
Then I had one where they mixed the Whiz and a bit of au jus in when they were cooking the meat. It was wonderful. If I'm making a cheese steak now, that's what I do. Still melt the provolone on the bread, but that bit of cheesy sauce mixed in is great. I've tried other methods, like making a provolone sauce, and they are good but not quite the same.
Don't care for bagels of any sort, so I have no opinion there.
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  #25  
Old 07 September 2017, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Errata View Post
Some New Yorkers will claim there's more to it, like their tap water making it different, which is dubious. But it's true that most places outside of New York will lack the knowledge to make them as well.
It helps if you live in a community with a large, well-established Ashkenazi Jewish community. I know there are places on the east side of Cleveland where you can boiled bagels, and I'm guessing there are places in Cincinnati, too. The deli that has them here was started in a predominantly Jewish suburb, but the family had moved here from NYC.
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  #26  
Old 07 September 2017, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Yes, I prefer provolone on my cheese steaks as well. Cheez Whiz is just all around horrible stuff.
I had to head to Wikipedia to see if y'all were pulling my leg. Wow that sounds awful... And yet, I want to try it for myself.
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  #27  
Old 08 September 2017, 02:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
They can be steam baked, were steam is injected into the oven as they are baked.
Interesting; thanks for the info! I've had traditional New York bagels as well as the fluffier kind, but I always figured the difference had something to do with preservatives or yeast or some other ingredient. Now I know. I like both, though of course packaged bread of any sort can never hold a candle to the fresh-baked variety.
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  #28  
Old 08 September 2017, 06:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Some of them are named after places, though! Isigny is in Normandy, for example. It would be like having a map of the States and putting Baked Alaska in Florida, and Philadelphia Cheese in San Francisco...
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Being from the UK, he might not. I think the Philly association he was going for was more likely the Philly cheese steak, which did originate in Philadelphia. There's no cream cheese in it, Philadelphia or any other brand. AFAIK there's no such thing as "Philly cheese," although I can understand why you might think there was if you'd heard the term "Philly cheese steak" but didn't know what was on it.
In the UK one of the most popular brands of cream cheese is called Philadelphia.
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  #29  
Old 08 September 2017, 07:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sultana of Beetroot View Post
In the UK one of the most popular brands of cream cheese is called Philadelphia.
We have the same brand here. I have some in my fridge at the moment and it looks identical. It is made here though.
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  #30  
Old 08 September 2017, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
Most store bought bagels seem like torus shaped loafs of bread. They'll treat the "crust" before baking so that it has a slightly different consistency, but it's still not right. Dedicated bagel shops are better than that, but even they can't always seem to replicate it.

Some New Yorkers will claim there's more to it, like their tap water making it different, which is dubious. But it's true that most places outside of New York will lack the knowledge to make them as well.
Madison, Wisconsin has New York style bagels- Bagels Forever. http://www.bagelsforever.com

I've been told they're pretty close. Having never been to New York City, I have no idea. They are tasty, though.
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  #31  
Old 08 September 2017, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
I only eat foods from regions with less than 5 of magnetic declination.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfresh View Post
Yeah, foods get too metallic when they are from over 6.
I only buy bacon if the butcher can prove his 6 of Kevin Bacon...



Also, Nanaimo bars are named after Nanaimo, B.C. (Canada)...
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  #32  
Old 08 September 2017, 12:36 PM
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Kitap, I'm not surprised Madison has NY-style bagels. There's a large, established Jewish community in Wisconsin. Golda Meir grew up in Milwaukee (after emigrating from the Ukraine).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sultana of Beetroot View Post
In the UK one of the most popular brands of cream cheese is called Philadelphia.
So do we. That's why I mentioned that the Philly cheese steak does not include cream cheese, "Philadelphia or any other brand."
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  #33  
Old 08 September 2017, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Being from the UK, he might not. I think the Philly association he was going for was more likely the Philly cheese steak, which did originate in Philadelphia.
Ah! I saw Philadelphia Cheese, and immediately thought of the brand. Yes, I can see that he might have meant Philadelphia cheese steak. (Richard? Pipe in here!) The first time I heard the term cheese steak, I thought "beef steak, ham steak, tuna steak, cheese steak - it must be a slab of cheese cooked on the grill!" Only later did I learn it was a Philadelphia-style steak sandwich with cheese.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
IDK, but boiling before baking is the reason that real/NYC-style bagels have a chewier, less bread-like texture than Lenders/Thomas/fast food bagels.
IMHO the perfect New York bagel has a chewy-but-fluffy interior, a paper-thin but crispy exterior, and a one-day shelf life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sultana of Beetroot View Post
In the UK one of the most popular brands of cream cheese is called Philadelphia.
Yep, that's the brand that originated in New York state (named after Philadelphia's reputation for good cream cheese) and now owned by Kraft. Tastes great on a New York bagel!
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  #34  
Old 08 September 2017, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
So do we. That's why I mentioned that the Philly cheese steak does not include cream cheese, "Philadelphia or any other brand."
Goodness I completely missed that, was clearly just too hung up on finding pictures of food
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  #35  
Old 08 September 2017, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
Ah! I saw Philadelphia Cheese, and immediately thought of the brand. Yes, I can see that he might have meant Philadelphia cheese steak. (Richard? Pipe in here!) The first time I heard the term cheese steak, I thought "beef steak, ham steak, tuna steak, cheese steak - it must be a slab of cheese cooked on the grill!" Only later did I learn it was a Philadelphia-style steak sandwich with cheese.
I am now trying to figure out what kind of cheese could stand up to being grilled as a slab. My wife loves browned, almost burnt black, cheese, and would probably go nuts if there was a way to have a block of cheese with that outside.
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  #36  
Old 08 September 2017, 02:18 PM
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Halloumi, feta, or ricotta are pretty hard cheeses with high melting points. In keeping with the original thread, you may find all these cheeses at Whole Foods.
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  #37  
Old 08 September 2017, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sultana of Beetroot View Post
Goodness I completely missed that, was clearly just too hung up on finding pictures of food
No worries, I've done the same thing.
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  #38  
Old 08 September 2017, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Kitap, I'm not surprised Madison has NY-style bagels. There's a large, established Jewish community in Wisconsin. Golda Meir grew up in Milwaukee (after emigrating from the Ukraine)
Apparently it was founded by students who showed up at the UW and said "where are the NY style bagels?"
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  #39  
Old 08 September 2017, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
I am now trying to figure out what kind of cheese could stand up to being grilled as a slab. My wife loves browned, almost burnt black, cheese, and would probably go nuts if there was a way to have a block of cheese with that outside.
If they can fry cheese, I'm sure they can grill it too.
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  #40  
Old 08 September 2017, 03:31 PM
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Speaking of cheese, did anyone else here know "brick" is actually a kind of cheese? I always thought it was just a description of how the cheese looks, as in "let's buy a brick of cheese". Learn something knew everyday .
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