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  #41  
Old 11 January 2007, 04:27 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
It's the definition of "brick" that's in question, really. How many streets are paved with brick even now?
Newly paved, probably none. But some streets in the older sections of towns and cities in Ohio still have exposed brick pavement, and the asphalt on many other streets was originally laid over brick. I have never seen a cobblestoned street in Ohio, though. Perhaps bricks were easier to obtain, or cheaper, or thought to be more "modern" or efficient, than cobblestone.
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  #42  
Old 11 January 2007, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Signora Del Drago View Post
This http://static.flickr.com/8/10757122_2b5272bcea_m.jpg will take you to a brick-paved street
OK, that sort of brick paving is common in pedestrian areas in the UK, so it is still being used for streets that don't get much traffic and need to look decorative. I hadn't realised it was enough of an innovation to need its first use recorded, though... and like Dactyl, given that both bricks and streets have been around for a long time, I'm surprised it was first done as recently as 1870!
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  #43  
Old 11 January 2007, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
True, although the city shares a consolidated government with Duval County, which increases the land area of the city limits. However, various web sites give different figures ranging from 758 to 841 square miles.
I had always heard that Oklahoma City, OK was the largest city in area in the US. But according to this Wikipedia article it is seventh. But it is the largest that is NOT a consolidated city/county.

Oklahoma City is the seventh largest city in the country in terms of geographic area, and the largest in land area that is not a consolidated city-county
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_City,_Oklahoma

I was alway impressed by the three working ranches that where contained inside of Oklahoma City's borders.
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  #44  
Old 11 January 2007, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
OK, that sort of brick paving is common in pedestrian areas in the UK, so it is still being used for streets that don't get much traffic and need to look decorative. I hadn't realised it was enough of an innovation to need its first use recorded, though... and like Dactyl, given that both bricks and streets have been around for a long time, I'm surprised it was first done as recently as 1870!
I'm not sure why it wasn't done in Europe or the UK before 1870 -- maybe cobblestones were cheaper? -- but in much of the US, even in areas settled long before 1870, streets may not have been paved at all before until the last quarter of the 19th century.
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  #45  
Old 11 January 2007, 06:18 PM
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CALIFORNIA ... Its economy is so large that if it were a country, it would rank seventh in the entire world
This is mentioned often. I don't know if it's true or what criteria is used to determine the size of an economy, but I don't think it's the most interesting thing about my state.
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  #46  
Old 11 January 2007, 06:42 PM
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MARYLAND ... The Oujia board was created in Baltimore in 1892.
Actually the patent was applied for in 1890 and granted in 1891. But if we really want to get technical, it would appear that Misters Bond, Kennard and Maupin stole the idea. "The New Planchette - Mysterious Talking Board and Table" was the subject of a March 1886 New York Daily Tribune article.

cite

There are so many more important things about Maryland that could have been on the list.

Maryland had the first...
  • Presbyterian Church in the US (1684)
  • English-style horse racing introduced in America in Maryland (1745)
  • School in colonial Americal (1750)
  • Balloon ascension in the US (1784)
  • Chartered water company in US - Baltimore Water Company (1792)
  • The "Maryland Act of Religious Toleration," was the first colonial religious liberty act enacted by an established legislature.
  • The first printing of the Declaration of Independence that contained the signers was done in Baltimore. (1777)
  • Maryland was the home of the first Sunday newspaper published in America.(The Sunday Monitor, 1796)

The list goes on and on. Here's a cite , however it does have the 1892 date for the Ouija board which is incorrect.

Last edited by MegansMom; 11 January 2007 at 06:44 PM. Reason: 'cause I forgot to use spell-check
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  #47  
Old 11 January 2007, 07:34 PM
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TallGeekyGirl TallGeekyGirl is offline
 
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This site has facts that are a little more factual...
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  #48  
Old 11 January 2007, 09:17 PM
DaGuyWitBluGlasses DaGuyWitBluGlasses is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Signora Del Drago View Post

DaGuyWitBluGlasses, cobblestone is not made like brick. From my dictionary: a rounded stone larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder, formerly much used for paving streets. I can't link to that, but this page indicates that they are naturally formed.I wish I could find a photo of Broad Street in Columbus. It is beautiful.
That's a more precise definition, and i'm a little suprised to see it carried it so many general dictionaries, i would have expected a descriptive dictionary to jsut say "stone used for paving roads." Afterall, if you pick up a rock the size of your fist, isn't it called just plain "rock"?

"Cobblestone road" can refer to any road made of stone or something similar, where the pieces are the size of cobblestones: (e.g. the type of roads would be -dirt, -plank, -cobblestone, -macadam, -tarmac, -asphalt. Cobblestone roads would include even man-made bricks)

By "round" the dictionaries mean more of smoothed by the action of water and sand, an not round like a ball or oval.

And brick can refer to a mostly rectangular prism shape, and not necessarily a man-made object.
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  #49  
Old 11 January 2007, 09:21 PM
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damian damian is offline
 
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Originally Posted by RainyDaze View Post
The Pentagon is in Arlington, Virginia just south of D.C. and the Potomac river.

If memory serves me the Pentagon is on land that was supposed to be part of Washington D.C. but Virginia never got around to donating its chunk of land. Washington D.C. was supposed to be rectangular in shape with the Potomac running through it. Only Maryland actually donated land so D.C is entirely north of the Potomac. Please feel free to shoot me down on this one folks.


The Pentagon website gives the mailing address of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs as:

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
9999 Joint Staff Pentagon
Washington, DC 20318-9999

The physical address, however, is: 48 N. Rotary Road, Arlington, Virginia 22211
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  #50  
Old 11 January 2007, 10:33 PM
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LOUISIANA ... Has parishes instead of counties because they were originally Spanish church units.
I doubt this one. Yes, the Catholic church does use parish, as well as other words, but the French use it far more than the Spanish.

Up here in the Acadian hotbed of New Brunswick (home of the most Acadians in North America) we have plenty of parishes. It only makes sense that the Acadians from here moved south and kept the use of the name when they relocated at the mouth of the Mississippi.

Last edited by UEL; 11 January 2007 at 10:36 PM. Reason: Hit the wrong button at the wrong time.
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  #51  
Old 11 January 2007, 11:26 PM
White Canvas White Canvas is offline
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses View Post
That's a more precise definition, and i'm a little suprised to see it carried it so many general dictionaries, i would have expected a descriptive dictionary to jsut say "stone used for paving roads." Afterall, if you pick up a rock the size of your fist, isn't it called just plain "rock"?
That's because they are not just used for roads.
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  #52  
Old 12 January 2007, 12:47 AM
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WYOMING ... Was the first state to allow women to vote.
Yes, but that is a huge simplification. Wyoming gave women the vote when it was still a territory in 1869. In 1890 when Wyoming was working towards becoming a state Congress threatened to withhold statehood unless women's sufferage was removed from the state's constitution. Supposedly the response was a telegram that stated that Wyoming would rather wait 100 years than join the Union as a state without women's sufferage. Congress backed down and Wyoming was made a state in 1890.

Wyoming also had the first female justices of the peace, Esther Hobart Morris and Caroline Neil, and the first female governor, Nellie Tayloe Ross.

Noemi
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  #53  
Old 12 January 2007, 12:49 AM
That_Todd_Guy
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
The Pentagon website gives the mailing address of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs as:

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
9999 Joint Staff Pentagon
Washington, DC 20318-9999

The physical address, however, is: 48 N. Rotary Road, Arlington, Virginia 22211

Curiously enough, 9999 is an invalid plus four for a zip code. The USPS give the zip code for 9999 Joint Staff Pentagon, Washington DC as 20318-0001.

In fact, the USPS has a special category of fines for presort companies that barcode mail with 0000 or 9999 as the plus four.
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  #54  
Old 12 January 2007, 02:01 AM
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Signora Del Drago Signora Del Drago is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
The Pentagon website gives the mailing address of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs as:

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
9999 Joint Staff Pentagon
Washington, DC 20318-9999

The physical address, however, is: 48 N. Rotary Road, Arlington, Virginia 22211
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_Todd_Guy View Post
Curiously enough, 9999 is an invalid plus four for a zip code. The USPS give the zip code for 9999 Joint Staff Pentagon, Washington DC as 20318-0001.

In fact, the USPS has a special category of fines for presort companies that barcode mail with 0000 or 9999 as the plus four.
Not according to this.
http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.d...&text=Zip_code
Quote:
It is common to use add-on code 9998 for mail addressed to the postmaster (to which requests for pictorial cancellations are usually addressed), 9999 for general delivery and other high-numbered add-on codes for business reply mail. For a unique ZIP code (explained below), the add-on code is typically 0001.
Maybe it's a mistake on the Pentagon site since the address number is 9999, and the plus four code is 9999, which is not actually invalid but is commonly used for general delivery. (?) According to the above quote, 0001 is typically used for a unique zip code, so that is probably correct. It certainly is confusing, but I suppose we'll never know for sure.

ETA: To add to the confusion, consider this:
http://zip4.usps.com/zip4/zcl_1_results.jsp
Quote:
22211 (ARLINGTON, VA IS NOT ACCEPTABLE - USE FT MYER)
Chart on this page:
Special Cases
Unique – The ZIP Code™ is used for a specific company or organization.
Military – This is a military specific ZIP Code for an APO/FPO (Air/Army Post Office or Fleet Post Office) or a domestic military installation.
PO Box Only – This ZIP Code is for a specific PO Box.
Not Acceptable – Means an inadequate city name has been entered or received based on information entered.

So is the Pentagon in Arlington or in Ft. Myer, or is Ft. Myer in Arlington, or is . . . ? Gaahhh! I give up.

ETA: Oh, goody, there's more!
According to this http://zip4.usps.com/zip4/zcl_1_results.jsp
there is only one zip code for Ft. Myer - 22211, so maybe the Joint Chiefs of Staff have offices at Ft. Myer and pick up their mail at the post office (general delivery), or a flunky picks it up, I mean. (?)

Last edited by Signora Del Drago; 12 January 2007 at 02:19 AM.
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  #55  
Old 12 January 2007, 09:43 AM
bwouns
 
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Quote: FLORIDA ... At 759 square miles, Jacksonville is the US's largest city.

This is incorrect. Officially Sitka, Juneau and Anchorage Alaska are the three largest cities in area. Granted they have consolidated city/borough governments but Jacksonville has an equivalent situation. So under no criteria would Jacksonville be considered the largest.
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  #56  
Old 12 January 2007, 10:10 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_Todd_Guy View Post
In fact, the USPS has a special category of fines for presort companies that barcode mail with 0000 or 9999 as the plus four.
You really get fined if you use the wrong code, even though it's as confusing as Signora Del Drago said?

If it was in the UK you'd just be able to address it to "The Pentagon", with nothing else, and it would get there without penalty since it's such a well-known address. The Post Office might not be happy that you'd left off the postcode, because that means they would have to sort it by hand - it would probably take longer than if you addressed it properly.

People (apparently) used to compete to find the most obscure way of expressing the address they could use and still have a letter delivered...
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  #57  
Old 12 January 2007, 10:20 AM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
People (apparently) used to compete to find the most obscure way of expressing the address they could use and still have a letter delivered...
Like this you mean?
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  #58  
Old 12 January 2007, 10:46 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarquin Farquart View Post
An excellent example, and recent too! I tried briefly to look for an article but only found something about Victorian spelling mistakes...
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  #59  
Old 12 January 2007, 11:00 AM
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OHIO ... The hot dog was invented here in 1900.


The hot dog predates 1900, and that's if we require the bun to be truly considered a hot dog. Leaving out the bun, it goes back much further.
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  #60  
Old 12 January 2007, 11:49 AM
That_Todd_Guy
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Signora Del Drago View Post
Well, sure. Call me out on a technicality. Four 9s can be the assigned as a valid plus four for "General Delivery" addresses, but "General Delivery" isn't a physical address. General Delivery mail is held for 30 days at the main Post Office of a city for it to be claimed. The Postal Service has to offer this service to be able to claim tht mail delivery is universal. A physical address (such as 9999 Joint Staff Pentagon) will never have a 9999.

Richard W, you may have missed that I said the fine was for presort companies. To claim presort rates on mailpieces with improperly coded zip plus fours is a finable offense, with especially hefty fines for using 0000 or 9999 as the plus four.

http://www.usps.com/merlin/_pdf/merlin_brochure.pdf

As someone who works in the mail presorting business, I know that we have a dedicated bin on our sorting machine to which we divert every piece with a 0000 or 9999 plus four. These pieces are mailed with full rate postage. In theory, the software we have assigning the barcodes will never apply an invalid plus four. Occasionally, though, we have a customer who thinks they're doing us a favor by putting their own (usually invalid) barcode on the mail.

http://www.g1.com/About/News/307.html
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