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  #1  
Old 11 June 2015, 12:38 PM
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Icon220 Sir Tim Hunt resigns from university role over girls comment

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"Three things happen when they are in the lab: you fall in love with them, they fall in love with you, and when you criticise them they cry."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-33090022
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  #2  
Old 11 June 2015, 02:46 PM
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My first thought was "what about Mme Curie, huh huh?" and then I realized I was falling into the same trap that so many do which is to only highlight women who not only succeed but excel and completely ignoring the average women of science who make the same contributions the average men of science make -- which is to say just because you are a woman doesn't mean you have to Mme Curie to be allowed to work in a damn laboratory!!
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Old 11 June 2015, 03:17 PM
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Another example of a brilliant scientist loosing his marbles when they get to old. I call it the "Linus Pauling" syndrome.
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Old 11 June 2015, 03:26 PM
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Using Marie Curie as a counter-example would not be bad for that reason. It would be bad because she did* fall in love with a colleague.

* I assume based on the fact that she married him.
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Old 11 June 2015, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Another example of a brilliant scientist loosing his marbles when they get to old. I call it the "Linus Pauling" syndrome.
Yeah, but Linus Pauling sundrome easy to cure. Lots of vitamin C and you're good to go.
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  #6  
Old 11 June 2015, 07:26 PM
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Another example of a brilliant scientist loosing his marbles when they get to old.
Is it really because he's too old, or has he always held archaically misogynistic views on women in the sciences but he's never been asked publicly about it before?
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Old 11 June 2015, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Is it really because he's too old, or has he always held archaically misogynistic views on women in the sciences but he's never been asked publicly about it before?
Could be. The "Pauling" syndrome might be a loss of inhibition with aging instead of a loss of cognitive skills. In Pauling's case it really appeared to be a pretty significant loss in cognitive skills.

I don't know if "archaically misogynistic" fits the situation. Hunt is 70+ years old so a lot of his life was lived when society was more misogynistic than it is now, and hence perhaps he isn't "archaically misogynistic" because these are changes that occurred largely in his lifetime.
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Old 11 June 2015, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Another example of a brilliant scientist loosing his marbles when they get to old. I call it the "Linus Pauling" syndrome.
Isn't it just a generalization though? I'm sure it's happened before he generalized it.

OY
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Old 11 June 2015, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
I don't know if "archaically misogynistic" fits the situation. Hunt is 70+ years old so a lot of his life was lived when society was more misogynistic than it is now, and hence perhaps he isn't "archaically misogynistic" because these are changes that occurred largely in his lifetime.
Expressing views on women from the standpoint of a patriarchal culture half a century ago most certainly fit "archaically misogynistic."
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Old 11 June 2015, 08:17 PM
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Can I be excused from thinking when I heard he had been dismissed. (BTW, how do you get rid of someone with a honorary appointment?) that there was a new opening at the McKinney TX police department he might be interested in?

Allow me

Ali
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Old 12 June 2015, 02:21 AM
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Default Women Scientists Are Tweeting “Sexy” Photos Of Themselves At Work To Shut Down Sexism

http://www.buzzfeed.com/skarlan/bioh...suits-are-nsfw

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Marine biologists, archeologists, and many others are posting images with the hashtag #distractinglysexy in response to comments made by British scientist Tim Hunt earlier this week.
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  #12  
Old 12 June 2015, 03:41 AM
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The life sciences attract more women then the other sciences* so at least half or more of his fellow workers for the last few decades were proberly women. Most of my work experience has been in lab and I recall no one falling in love at work. There was one couple but I think they fell in love at uni. No one cried when they were critised either.





* Not saying this it the way it should be but that is a discussion for another day.
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  #13  
Old 12 June 2015, 04:08 AM
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I know quite a few scientists who are married to other scientists. I don't know if the percent is greater than other fields, but mostly they meet in graduate school. I imagine they find similarities in their interests, as well as proximity. Lots of time is spent at school and in lab, so that tends to be your social circle.

Also, on the crying thing: I hate that crying seems to be classified as a 'girly' thing. We're also assuming that his criticism is actually as constructive as he thinks it is, but I have a sneaking suspicion that his methods of criticism are more equivalent to using an atom bomb to kill an ant.
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Old 12 June 2015, 04:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
The life sciences attract more women then the other sciences* so at least half or more of his fellow workers for the last few decades were proberly women.
That's not correct. Life sciences have achieved more parity than other sciences in the classroom but we aren't even nearly there in terms of faculty.
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Old 12 June 2015, 04:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Expressing views on women from the standpoint of a patriarchal culture half a century ago most certainly fit "archaically misogynistic."
I agree. I'm sure it's a bitter pill to swallow to realize that espousing the values that prevailed in your youth makes you archaic, but them's the breaks. You always have the option of getting with the times and treating women like people.
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Old 12 June 2015, 04:48 AM
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As for falling in love, it takes two so it's ironic... wait, no that's the wrong word... idiotic that he claims to want a "level playing field". As for crying, it's hardly the women's fault the men don't cry enough. What are they supposed to do, call them out on their sexist bullspit more often?
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  #17  
Old 12 June 2015, 05:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Expressing views on women from the standpoint of a patriarchal culture half a century ago most certainly fit "archaically misogynistic."
I agree. I'm sure it's a bitter pill to swallow to realize that espousing the values that prevailed in your youth makes you archaic, but them's the breaks. You always have the option of getting with the times and treating women like people.
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  #18  
Old 12 June 2015, 06:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lavender blue View Post
I know quite a few scientists who are married to other scientists. I don't know if the percent is greater than other fields, but mostly they meet in graduate school. I imagine they find similarities in their interests, as well as proximity. Lots of time is spent at school and in lab, so that tends to be your social circle.
I doubt this is unique to the field. Misogynists have been making these kinds of arguments about women in the workplace since who knows when. He could have been complaining about having to work with "girls" in any context.

"Three things happen when they are in the office/factory/garage/ER/senate/conference room/military/game: you fall in love with them, they fall in love with you, and then you cry about it in front of reporters and have to resign."
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Old 12 June 2015, 07:06 AM
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I also hate that a big deal is made over crying when women do anyone does it. I have, on a couple of occasions been so angry and stressed that I started crying. I was not irrational or incoherent. In fact, I think I stayed remarkably calm and collected considering what was happening. There was just some water leaking out of my eyes, and my voice got croakey. The polite and professional things to do would be a) ask me if I needed a moment, or b) ignore it and continue the conversation, since I am ignoring it. The things not to do are to panic or complain about women being emotional and crying in the workplace.
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  #20  
Old 12 June 2015, 07:22 AM
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The relevant xkcd
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