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  #1  
Old 10 May 2010, 07:26 PM
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Canuckistan Canuckistan is offline
 
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Icon97 Is 'momnesia' a real condition or an urban myth?

Vancouver-based researchers investigate the impact of pregnancy, including the child's sex, on memory and cognition

http://www.canada.com/health/momnesi...673/story.html
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  #2  
Old 10 May 2010, 09:34 PM
purpleiguana purpleiguana is offline
 
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I've always had a crappy memory. I'd love to blame it on any of my three pregnancies or on the near-constant state of variable levels of sleep deprivation since giving birth to my firstborn. But... nah... always had a crappy memory.
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Old 10 May 2010, 09:55 PM
TripleAAA TripleAAA is offline
 
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It's not just during pregnancy.

Wait, what's not just during pregnancy?




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  #4  
Old 10 May 2010, 10:27 PM
Aud 1 Aud 1 is offline
 
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I've had it ever since Little_Aud came home. I think it is all about sleep deprivation.
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  #5  
Old 10 May 2010, 10:51 PM
crescent crescent is offline
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aud 1 View Post
I've had it ever since Little_Aud came home. I think it is all about sleep deprivation.
I think the sleep deprivation thing does not get enough credit for the difficulty it causes. I wonder how much post-partum depression is due to the actual effects of motherhood, and how much is due to sleep deprivation and exhaustion.

I mean, obviously many women really do have post-partum depression, but, then again, losing sleep can really mess with your mind and emotions.
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  #6  
Old 10 May 2010, 11:06 PM
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IIRC the symptoms of sleep deprivation, and the symptoms of depression are similar. Very similar. Post-partum depression is definitely a real phenomena as you said, but I agree that sleep issues have got to be part of the problem too.

me
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  #7  
Old 11 May 2010, 11:33 AM
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Algae Algae is offline
 
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I think momnesia also has a lot to do with how you're now worrying/remembering/doing things for 2 people now. Before kids, you only had your schedule to remember or your to-do list, but a baby means remembering when you last fed them and what their schedule is and are they wearing 2 socks. It's just an overload that makes it difficult to remember a bunch of other things that aren't so immediate.
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  #8  
Old 11 May 2010, 03:56 PM
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I've never heard of this, not being a mom, but it makes sense what everyone has posted, sleep deprivation, more people to keep track of, etc.

I sadly only know of chemobrain from the hubby. He said that when he was going through chemo he just couldn't focus or make a decision at all.

I'd ask "Do you want peas or green beans?" & he just couldn't even make that insignificant decision.
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Old 11 May 2010, 04:09 PM
Sue Bee Sue Bee is offline
 
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I totally felt that the grub had claimed his bit of my brain, and while sleep deprivation could account for a large part of my fizzled memory and addledness, I wonder what part was due to hormones and other factors.


But clinically, I have no proof that I was any more confused and ditzy that is the norm for me.
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  #10  
Old 11 May 2010, 09:54 PM
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franjava franjava is offline
 
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I don't know how much of my memory problems are from having babyjava (now 8) vs. how much is from brain atrophy from disuse. Babyjava and memory loss happened at the same time though!
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  #11  
Old 12 May 2010, 04:38 AM
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missy_pooh_1997 missy_pooh_1997 is offline
 
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I believe it exists. When i gave birth to dd#2 I was at the hospital and about to call my husband to say I was awake and he could come to visit,I literally sat on the side of the bed for 15 minutes and couldnt remember my own phone #. I started to panic and my Dr. said don't worry it's just your hormones and that it would get better.
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  #12  
Old 17 June 2010, 01:04 AM
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My kids are approaching 30, and I still have momnesia.
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  #13  
Old 17 June 2010, 04:08 PM
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imjustasteph imjustasteph is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Algae View Post
I think momnesia also has a lot to do with how you're now worrying/remembering/doing things for 2 people now. Before kids, you only had your schedule to remember or your to-do list, but a baby means remembering when you last fed them and what their schedule is and are they wearing 2 socks. It's just an overload that makes it difficult to remember a bunch of other things that aren't so immediate.
I think this is pretty much it. I read somewhere that you can only hold a certain number of things in your immediate memory at once, though I forgot the number. Well, when you add a whole new list of things- the time baby ate last, where you put the paci, how many onesies you've got left before you absolutely must do a load of baby laundry- it just crowds out some other stuff.
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  #14  
Old 17 July 2010, 11:26 AM
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Default Sleep-Disordered Breathing

With our modern diet, we get plenty of calories in our developing years without having to chew much. Compare this with earlier diets of tough meats and other foods that required much chewing.

Much chewing during the developing years causes the skeleton of the jaw to grow deep and wide. Today, without this chewing, the population tends to have underdeveloped jaws - narrow side-to-side and front-to-back.

The evidence of this is in the high prevalence of recessed chins and crowded teeth. Crowded teeth are treated with ortodontic devices and tooth extractions. The jaw is not wide enough and deep enough to accomodate a normal amount of teeth. Wisdom teeth are often extracted because of lack of space.

With narrower jaws we have narrower breathing airways. Our tongues and soft palates are crowded in the jaw. When we fall asleep all of our muscles naturally relax and our tongues and soft palates relax and tend to fall back into our narrow airways. This causes full (apneas) or partial (hypopneas, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome) blockages of our airways. These conditions are called sleep-disordered-breathing (SDB). Sleep apnea is one of the conditions that falls under the umbrella of SDB.

When women become pregnant they gain weight. The additional weight is not just in the abdomen area, it is all over including the neck, the tongue and the soft palate.

Women who do not have SDB, but do have small jaws, often develop SDB during pregnancy due to the weight gain. Women who already have SDB will find that the weight gain from pregnancy increases the severity of their SDB.

With SDB, the patient experiences many arousals from sleep each night so that the muscles of the tongue and soft palate will flex and clear the airway obstruction. Sleep architecture and the amount of sleep are well below normal. Oxygen deprivation is also very common.

You can understand how a person who is sleep deprived and experiencing oxygen deprivation will not function well cognitively!!

BTW, the medical profession has been terribly ignorant of SDB, not only in pregnant women but also in the general population. During the last few years this is starting to gradually change.
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