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  #1  
Old 29 June 2007, 06:29 PM
Weezy Weezy is offline
 
 
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Default Trees shaped like chairs, ladders, and bicycle holders

http://wohba.com/pages/tree0307.html

Are these pictures real or are these pictures not real?
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  #2  
Old 29 June 2007, 06:32 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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On your page is a link to the person who does this kind of work with trees. Do you think the whole thing is a hoax?
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  #3  
Old 29 June 2007, 06:33 PM
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Spam & Cookies-mmm Spam & Cookies-mmm is offline
 
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From the site, this cite:
Quote:
Most of these photos are courtesy of Richard Reames,
author of the book Arborsculpture - arborsmith.com
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  #4  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:04 PM
TuFurg TuFurg is offline
 
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Why do I get the feeling that this will anger some people? I can see it now- claims of cruely to trees and forcing them to do "unnatural" things.

When I was a kid my grandfather had all sorts of old tractor parts laying around behind his barn. To this day some of them are now parts of the trees that grew there. Would be interesting to experiment.
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  #5  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:10 PM
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Cervus Cervus is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuFurg View Post
Why do I get the feeling that this will anger some people? I can see it now- claims of cruely to trees and forcing them to do "unnatural" things.
It's really no different than bonsai, in which trees are forced to remain small and are sometimes grown into particular shapes. Or topiary.

I remember reading in a "How-to" book about bonsai that the author encountered people who did claim it was cruel to force trees to remain potbound and small.

Damn hippies.
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  #6  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
I remember reading in a "How-to" book about bonsai that the author encountered people who did claim it was cruel to force trees to remain potbound and small.
My mom remembers seeing a "plant psychic" on a talk show in the 70's who claimed that bonsai are "very sad."
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  #7  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:24 PM
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Luka_the_Pooka Luka_the_Pooka is offline
 
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Yow!

Wow. The tree with the huge knot is possibly the most amazing thing that I have ever seen Considering how slowly trees grow, it must take a LONG time to guide them to grow like that . . .
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  #8  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:24 PM
matches
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spam & Cookies-mmm View Post
My mom remembers seeing a "plant psychic" on a talk show in the 70's who claimed that bonsai are "very sad."
Although I'm not particularly convinced of the sad notion I do wonder about the health of plant art, how often it has to be replaced, how much care it requires to stay a living tree, and how susceptable to desease it is.

That being said, I've seen trees like this up close an personal, I recall some zoos and parks aroudn the united states have them as additional attractions. I belive the Detroit zoo had such a tree at one point, and I think Boblo Island had a few as well.

As far as cruelty goes, plants have limited reasons to feel pain (they can't really do anything about it), though if they have any rudementary awarness it might be disturbing to them to have their parts so manipulated. That being said it probably is no more distrubing than having animals rip pieces off of you and consume them.
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  #9  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:26 PM
matches
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luka_the_Pooka View Post
Wow. The tree with the huge knot is possibly the most amazing thing that I have ever seen Considering how slowly trees grow, it must take a LONG time to guide them to grow like that . . .
As I recall they start when they are saplings, when they are much easier to bend, and they just keep manipulating them until they acheive the desired look. Grafting is also often a part of the process.
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  #10  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
One or two pictures look plausible but I think some of them are hoaxes.
Which ones, and why? They all look plausible to me.
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  #11  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:33 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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They all look perfectly real to me. Which pictures do you think are hoaxes, and why do you think so?

erwins
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  #12  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:45 PM
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Cervus Cervus is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matches View Post
Although I'm not particularly convinced of the sad notion I do wonder about the health of plant art, how often it has to be replaced, how much care it requires to stay a living tree, and how susceptable to desease it is.
Considering I've seen trees like ficus and some oaks naturally grow in weird contortionist shapes, I don't think the health of the plant is compromised by training the branches to bend a certain way. Trees will naturally grow around stationary objects.

When in Costa Rica this past spring, we found a type of ficus about 70-80 feet tall.






There are also lianas (thick jungle vines) that naturally grow in a ladder shape. Unfortunately my pictures of them came out blurry.
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  #13  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:49 PM
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granola shoes granola shoes is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spam & Cookies-mmm View Post
My mom remembers seeing a "plant psychic" on a talk show in the 70's who claimed that bonsai are "very sad."
Quote:
Originally Posted by matches View Post
Although I'm not particularly convinced of the sad notion I do wonder about the health of plant art, how often it has to be replaced, how much care it requires to stay a living tree, and how susceptable to desease it is.
I'm not an expert, but we do have a few bonzai at our house. (mr. shoes tends to them). In the case of bonzai, they do have certain fertilization and nutrient requirements, but nothing terribly painstaking or unusual. They seem to be hardier than most of our other plants; the evergreens can survive winters outdoors.

I wouldn't think the art trees suffer anything really. Plants can grow in weird angles and do some amazing things on their own, via gravitropism and the other -tropism where they grow towards the light (why can't I remember that term??). Other than the training (like the supports in the Star of David-looking picture), I don't see what extra care it would require. And since these are tree-on-tree (hah! sounds dirty!) sculptures, I don't think there would be damage or disease susceptability. This is all just based on science major-level Biology, but I can't really think of reasons why this would hurt or harm the trees. They're actually very resilient.

And like Cervus pointed out, they really are just like giant bonzais in the training aspect.

ETA: Hey! Cervus snuck in there with her awesome pictures while I was posting!

ETAII: PHOTOTROPISM!!!!

Last edited by granola shoes; 29 June 2007 at 07:56 PM.
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  #14  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:54 PM
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Cervus Cervus is offline
 
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Here's a picture of a monkey ladder liana from Central America and the Amazon. It naturally grows in this shape.
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  #15  
Old 29 June 2007, 07:59 PM
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granola shoes granola shoes is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
What about the tree chair and other whacky shapes? How do they get two different trees spaced 20 feet apart to merge together to become one tree?
The shapes are a result of training, with wires, supports, etc, like bonzai.
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  #16  
Old 29 June 2007, 08:00 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
The two photographs with text look impossible. The last one looks impossible too but it's clear.
The two with text are pretty obviously using grafts. As for the last one, you have to picture the trees being younger and more pliable. They would have been trained toward one another, and possibly grafted or just grown together at the top. Then they just grew larger over time.

erwins
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  #17  
Old 29 June 2007, 10:58 PM
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Le Chevalier Blanc Le Chevalier Blanc is offline
 
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Default Bonfante Gardens (now Gilroy Gardens)

Since I've personally walked underneath the tree in the last photo, I can 100% guarantee you that it is real. Many of these kind of trees are found at Bonfante Gardens (now Gilroy Gardens) and are referred to as "Circus Trees"
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  #18  
Old 29 June 2007, 11:02 PM
Base Ten
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granola shoes View Post
I'm not an expert, but we do have a few bonzai at our house. (mr. shoes tends to them). In the case of bonzai, they do have certain fertilization and nutrient requirements, but nothing terribly painstaking or unusual. They seem to be hardier than most of our other plants; the evergreens can survive winters outdoors.
I've purchased bonzai's for Mrs. Ten a few times for anniversaries and such. They never seem to last longer than 3-6 months. I guess she has a brown thumb when it comes to these, but other plants seem to have no problem with her. She never gets to the point of trying to prune them - just trying to keep them alive.

Base Ten
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