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  #221  
Old 28 January 2013, 01:53 PM
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Unsurprising news of the week:

The royal hoax radio show has been cancelled.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-21228017
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  #222  
Old 09 September 2014, 12:15 AM
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Rather than start another thread I thought I'd just use this one as the headline is pretty much the same . The reason I'm posting though is to rant. It didn't take long for the "jokes" to start about Kate's morning sickness. Some so-called humourist on the radio earlier today was talking about how she really has bulimia and now she's got a good excuse to throw up .
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  #223  
Old 09 September 2014, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloe View Post
Then why is a king's wife a queen and a queen's husband a prince consort?
The English word "queen" is derived from an old Germanic word meaning "wife" or "woman." The Swedish word for wife is 'kvinna,' from the same root--I may not have the spelling quite right--and there is an archaic English word "quean" meaning "peasant woman."

The idea of a woman ruling in her own right in the European tradition is a relatively recent development, so what to call him has been improvised. In England, for example, Queen Matilda (she called herself 'Domina Anglorum'--
'Mistress of the English', as at that time the word "queen" still meant "king's wife", not "female ruler") was a widow; Queen Mary I was married to the King of Spain, so he didn't need an English title; Queen Elizabeth I never married; Queen Mary II's husband was made co-ruler by special Act of Parliament as William III; Queen Anne's husband was Prince George of Denmark, and because he didn't have a very strong personality (King William said, "I've tried him drunk and tried him sober, and I can't make anything of him either way.") and was so crippled with gout that he couldn't stand for long periods or walk very far or very fast, and accordingly seldom made public appearances---he never got, I think, a British title; Queen Victoria's husband was Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha who was given the special title of Prince Consort.

Her present Majesty's husband was born Prince Phillip of Greece, but had to renounce his Greek title when he became a British citizen; King George made him Duke of Edenborough, and in light of his descent from Queen Victoria gave him the style of "Royal Highness" and declared that any children he had by the Princess Elizabeth (as she was then) would be born as Princes & Princesses (otherwise Charles would have been born "Earl of Merioneth" and Anne as "Lady Anne Mountbatten", and their mother would have had to create them as a prince and princess when she ascended the throne, which would have been awkward.) (Theoretically, if she had died and he remarried, the children of his second duchess would have been titled as sons/daughters of a duke in the ordinary way.) But because he was introduced to the British Public as "Prince Phillip of Greece", and had the style of "Royal Highness", he was commonly referred to as "Prince Phillip", even though it was not technically correct. She corrected the anomaly some years later by giving him the title of "Prince of the United Kingdom" (she wanted to call him "Prince of the Commonwealth", but some of the Commonwealth Republics objected.) I'm not sure about other countries' customs.

In some languages a different word is used for "wife of a king" and "female ruler." In Greek, for example, the king's wife is a 'basilea' and a female ruler is a 'basilis'. What the husband of a 'basilis' is called, I don't know.
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  #224  
Old 09 September 2014, 02:10 PM
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In most Indo-European languages the word for queen is simply a female form of the word king. English and the Scandinavian languages are exceptions to this.
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  #225  
Old 09 September 2014, 02:42 PM
Elkhound Elkhound is offline
 
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Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
In most Indo-European languages the word for queen is simply a female form of the word king. English and the Scandinavian languages are exceptions to this.
As noted above, Greek is another, although they come from the same root.

In many languages 'ruler of a principality' and 'child of a king' use the same word. Spanish is an exception; 'principe' is 'ruler of a principality', while the word for 'king's child' is 'infante'.
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  #226  
Old 09 September 2014, 10:57 PM
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Aren't Basílissa, Basíleia, Basilís, and Basilinna female forms of Basileus? They certainly don't seem to mean 'wife of Basileus'.
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  #227  
Old 10 September 2014, 01:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elkhound View Post
As noted above, Greek is another, although they come from the same root.

In many languages 'ruler of a principality' and 'child of a king' use the same word. Spanish is an exception; 'principe' is 'ruler of a principality', while the word for 'king's child' is 'infante'.
Le Roi and Le Dauphin mais les autres enfantes s'appelle les princes et les princesses.
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  #228  
Old 10 September 2014, 02:22 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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So, the chicken and egg question with prince/principality. Prince probably comes from Latin for 'first' and predates the word principality. So it's not so much that 'rulers of principalities are called princes' as that principalities are places ruled by princes. The heir to the throne is still called príncipe in Spanish and Asturias is a Principado because it would be ruled by a prince, not the other way around.

Last edited by ganzfeld; 10 September 2014 at 02:28 AM.
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  #229  
Old 02 May 2015, 10:19 AM
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The Duchess of Cambridge was safely delivered of a baby girl, fourth in line to the throne. And she will remain as such even if she eventually has a younger brother.
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  #230  
Old 02 May 2015, 01:24 PM
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Happy news on both counts Andrew .
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  #231  
Old 02 May 2015, 10:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware View Post
The Duchess of Cambridge was safely delivered of a baby girl, fourth in line to the throne. And she will remain as such even if she eventually has a younger brother.
Yes, she will stay forth in line, regardless of the gender of any subsequent babies. The law changed recently (last few years I think) to remove that long-standing protocol.
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