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  #1  
Old 16 October 2013, 10:00 PM
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Devil Ontario schools axe Halloween celebration for more inclusive Spirit Day

An Ontario school that feels Halloween is too exclusive an event has cancelled its holiday celebrations and replaced them with the toned down, more inclusive Spirit Day.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily...142959554.html
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  #2  
Old 16 October 2013, 10:10 PM
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Another example of the WAR ON HALLOWEEN!!!!!! Damn Obama!

Last edited by E. Q. Taft; 16 October 2013 at 10:17 PM.
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  #3  
Old 16 October 2013, 10:47 PM
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Well...that's stupid.

Sounds like more administrators with nothing better to do with their time. I'd at least be understanding if, say, costumes had been causing problems at the school or money was too tight for a dance, but claiming "inclusivity"?

You can't claim "real world" either because most jobs I've had, aside from the defense contractor, totally had Halloween parties with costumes.
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Old 17 October 2013, 04:00 AM
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And I guess (St.) Valentines day (we shll call it Pink Heart day!) and St. Patrick's (green plant day?) day will be done away with as well -
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:45 AM
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For the first few years of school we wore our costumes to school on Halloween day and had a costume parade, but it was discontinued due to the number of kids losing or damaging parts of their costumes before the big night (this was in the mid-'80s). It was replaced with an activity afternoon consisting of Halloween-themed versions of traditional kid's party games, which was fine by us. So I would be okay with a no-costumes school policy, though not for the reason given in the article.
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not_Done_Living View Post
And I guess (St.) Valentines day (we shll call it Pink Heart day!) and St. Patrick's (green plant day?) day will be done away with as well -
Don't see why not. Why should public schools be honoring Catholic saints at all?
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:51 AM
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In preschool and the young elementary school years, we were allowed to wear our costumes to school, at least for part of the day for Halloween parties and a "parade" around school grounds. In the upper level grades, we weren't allowed to wear costumes at any time during school because they were deemed "distracting".

I found it hard to comprehend how a 6th grader is supposedly more easily distracted by Halloween costumes than a 5-year-old.
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Old 17 October 2013, 07:06 AM
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I get that dressing up is fun. I don't see why the schools should waste their time with that kind of thing if they don't see any point. Kids can do that kind of thing on their own time.
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Old 17 October 2013, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
In preschool and the young elementary school years, we were allowed to wear our costumes to school, at least for part of the day for Halloween parties and a "parade" around school grounds. In the upper level grades, we weren't allowed to wear costumes at any time during school because they were deemed "distracting".

I found it hard to comprehend how a 6th grader is supposedly more easily distracted by Halloween costumes than a 5-year-old.
Could be that many girls tend to go very skimpy when dressing up during the teenage years.
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Old 17 October 2013, 11:18 AM
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I didn't know schools allowed kids to dress up in costumes at school! Wouldn't some costumes break zero tolerance policies on weapons? I thought halloween was a thing that you celebrate in you neighborhood, not at school
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Old 17 October 2013, 11:21 AM
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I think the last Halloween I had at school was 4th grade (not including college which had a famous Halloween party with a very old tradition).
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Old 17 October 2013, 12:44 PM
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My elementary school used to have a Halloween carnival after school hours. When I was in fifth grade (mid nineties) some conservative Christians complained about Halloween being Satan's holiday*, so they changed it to a "Fall festival." I remember being furious because the fifth graders traditionally converted their classrooms into a haunted house, and when it was finally my class's turn, the whole thing got cancelled.

*I grew up in Texas, if this story doesn't make that obvious.
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Old 17 October 2013, 04:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fitz1980 View Post
Could be that many girls tend to go very skimpy when dressing up during the teenage years.
Wearing costumes doesn't mean doing away with any sort of dress code.
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spud Sabre View Post
Wearing costumes doesn't mean doing away with any sort of dress code.
I have known several girls who did take Halloween as an excuse to dress more provocatively than they normally dressed. The film "Mean Girls" even had a joke about it where one of the girls says that the great thing about Halloween is that you can dress "slutty" and people won't look down on you for it like they normally would.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Veruca View Post
My elementary school used to have a Halloween carnival after school hours. When I was in fifth grade (mid nineties) some conservative Christians complained about Halloween being Satan's holiday*, so they changed it to a "Fall festival." I remember being furious because the fifth graders traditionally converted their classrooms into a haunted house, and when it was finally my class's turn, the whole thing got cancelled.

*I grew up in Texas, if this story doesn't make that obvious.
The church I grew up attending had a similar problem. They used to throw a big Halloween party with a haunted house in some Sunday school rooms, people in costumes and such. The party was a fundraiser for the youth group & they organized it. When some of the more conservative A-holes thought that dressing in scary costumes and having a haunted house meant we were "worshipping the devil" they turned it into a "fall festival" that banned scary costumes and the haunted house. Without those things interest died off a year or two later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Jay View Post
I didn't know schools allowed kids to dress up in costumes at school! Wouldn't some costumes break zero tolerance policies on weapons? I thought halloween was a thing that you celebrate in you neighborhood, not at school
These days it's more of a thing kids do at the mall than in the neighborhood. Thanks to the ULs about razer blades and poison in candy many parents are too afraid to take their kids trick-or-treating in the neighborhood. So instead malls have offered kids a chance to walk from store to store and get candy from the clerks.
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:42 PM
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There's a point to be made if you have a school with a lot of poor kids (or specifically, a school where you have a great disparity in income, as often happens in inner-city schools), or a lot of immigrant families, or both, where some kids will be on the outside looking in - simply because, well, their parents can't afford a costume, or don't understand the importance for kids to "conform". There's no good way around it, short of making it more of an event where kids bring in and make or modify their costumes. Believe me, the early grades were full of cutting, pasting, coloring, painting, and other "arts and crafts" stuff that a clumsy kid like me just hated, so this isn't exactly distracting.

ganzfeld - the OP linked to some articles which said that schools merely limited the costumes to exclude weapons, and could still be deemed inappropriate, but you're not likely to have that in those under ten years old. At my elementary school, 6th grade was the cutoff for costumes and such, but for grade 6 and up, there was a Hallowe'en dance...
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Old 17 October 2013, 06:42 PM
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Lots of neighborhoods still have trick or treating. I don't think the mall thing is at all universal.
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  #17  
Old 17 October 2013, 06:53 PM
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Trick or treating in neighborhoods is alive and well around here. It was, and AFAIK still is, a huge deal in the neighborhood where I used to live. Adults who didn't have kids to take around throw parties or just sit outside and socialize. The firefighters in that suburb drive around the neighborhoods handing candy out to the kids.
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  #18  
Old 17 October 2013, 07:06 PM
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The U.S. is such a huge country that it's impossible to generalize how everyone celebrates Halloween. I was dumbfounded to learn a few years ago that some areas have specific days when kids are "scheduled" to trick-or-treat, and those days aren't always on October 31st. Where's the fun in that? October 31st is, and has always been where I've lived, a night for running around neighborhoods in the dark, begging for candy and causing general mayhem with eggs and toilet paper, regardless of school nights. In my hometown if a kid showed up to trick-or-treat on any day besides October 31st, they'd get laughed at and told to come back on Halloween.

There's a local church here that does "trunk-or-treat" where, as I understand it, kids walk around a parking lot during the afternoon, collecting candy from parents who camp out in their parked cars. I can't think of anything that would have depressed me more as a kid. The best part of Halloween to me wasn't the candy; it was running around in the dark, in a costume, with little or no parental supervision.
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Old 17 October 2013, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
There's a local church here that does "trunk-or-treat" where, as I understand it, kids walk around a parking lot during the afternoon, collecting candy from parents who camp out in their parked cars. I can't think of anything that would have depressed me more as a kid. The best part of Halloween to me wasn't the candy; it was running around in the dark, in a costume, with little or no parental supervision.
I'm right there with you. I'm a very picky eater and didn't even like most of the candy we were given. I just liked dressing in a costume, running around the neighborhood playing pranks with no parental supervision.

Fiancť and I have been together for 5 years and the only trick-or-treaters we get are neighbors who know us already. When I was a kid my sister, myself and our friends would knock on all 96 doors in our neighborhood regardless if we knew the homeowners or not.
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Old 17 October 2013, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Trick or treating in neighborhoods is alive and well around here. It was, and AFAIK still is, a huge deal in the neighborhood where I used to live.
I actually got overwhelmed in my old neighborhood because so many people drove in to trick or treat. The roads were lined with parked cars and there were so many kids the doorbell rang constantly for hours. When I finally ran out of candy some teenagers broke my porch light. I felt like a Scrooge but after that we started taking our kids out to Halloween parties. It wasn't fun to live in that neighborhood on that night.
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