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  #941  
Old 17 October 2018, 05:23 AM
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Cervus Cervus is offline
 
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I just watched the rocket launch; it was awesome even with the street light blaring. I can't imagine how spectacular it would have been in the dark.
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  #942  
Old 17 October 2018, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by ASL View Post
I hate light pollution.
Me too. When I went for a walk in the woods on Friday night (and thought I'd lost my glasses the next day) I walked up to the top of a hill near mine to lie on the grass for a bit. It was overcast, and the whole visible part of the sky was literally bright, glowing orange. So much for "nature". At least at that time of night, the motorway was relatively quiet - that was only a couple of hundred metres away, and usually there's a constant roar from that as well once you get out of the valley or down to the south side of the hills.

This is the same hill I used to walk up and down every day on my way to and from work when I first moved to High Wycombe, and I remember this from walking home in the dark in the winter months back then too. I'd forgotten how dramatic the effect is and how annoying it is, though.

(The opposite for me was in Mongolia in 2007, when I first walked out of the ger in the dark on the edge of the Gobi desert, looked up and literally almost fell over. My parents live in a relatively dark area for the south-east of England, and on clear nights you could just about see the Milky Way from their garden, as a very faint shape. Here it looked almost solid. I've still never seen another sky like that, even in other deserts.)
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  #943  
Old 17 October 2018, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASL View Post
One reason I look forward to moving out to west Texas is to get clear of the light pollution. Or at least make it easier to get clear of it. Round here, the nearest dark skies site is a two hour drive away. I tried it once, but by the time I got there the forecast had changed. I tried it again and the sky was clear, but it was almost a full moon (I should have checked before I left, but it was on a whim).

I hate light pollution.
Tucson's light control laws are nice. I like being able to look up at the sky in just about the middle of the city and see stars.
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  #944  
Old 17 October 2018, 01:46 PM
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On our way to Philadelphia last week, my daughter and I stopped for dinner in the middle of nowhere*, and were hoping for some stargazing, but unfortunately the cloud cover was too thick.

*There's a lot of that between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.
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  #945  
Old 17 October 2018, 02:14 PM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
*There's a lot of that between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.
That is where I live, and it is nice to see some stars at night. There is a spot in northern Pennsylvania (Cherry Springs State Park) that has some of the darkest skies on the East Coast. I want to go camping there next year, to see all the stars. Hopefully it won't be overcast.
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  #946  
Old 17 October 2018, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
I know it makes the neighborhood less safe, but I preferred the streetlight being out.
Does it, though?

-- I was going to ask whether anybody had done studies about this, but then thought that I'd better look, and sure enough, a number of people have. The results overall seem to be muddy, but may mean that certain kinds of lighting reduce crime in certain circumstances, but that usually street lighting doesn't reduce crime, and in some other circumstances may increase it.

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2014/...s-debate/8359/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.448bc124d13a

https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu/proje...e-lights-study

http://darksky.org/light-pollution/l...me-and-safety/


Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Me too. When I went for a walk in the woods on Friday night (and thought I'd lost my glasses the next day) I walked up to the top of a hill near mine to lie on the grass for a bit. It was overcast, and the whole visible part of the sky was literally bright, glowing orange.
People from cities who come visit me here often remark on the night sky (at any rate, if it isn't cloudy when they show up.)

But I'm less impressed; possibly because I remember what the sky looked like in areas like this when I was a child and outdoor lighting was a lot less prevalent. All the way around the horizon, and for some distance up into the sky, the accumulated light from area villages etc. washes out any starlight, so there's a ring with no visible stars; and I'm sure that even looking straight up we're not seeing anything like what we should.

If there's ever an area wide power outage here on a clear night (far less likely than on a stormy one), I'm going to be the one (or possibly one of the ones) jumping up and down with glee outside, saying 'Look at all the stars! Look at all the stars!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
On our way to Philadelphia last week, my daughter and I stopped for dinner in the middle of nowhere
There is no such place as the middle of nowhere. Every place is the center of the world.
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  #947  
Old 17 October 2018, 03:46 PM
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I was thinking that the lack of lighting would make the neighborhood less safe for pedestrians or bike riders.
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  #948  
Old 17 October 2018, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
There is no such place as the middle of nowhere. Every place is the center of the world.
A very rural center of the world, then. It made for a beautiful drive.
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  #949  
Old 17 October 2018, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
But I'm less impressed; possibly because I remember what the sky looked like in areas like this when I was a child and outdoor lighting was a lot less prevalent. All the way around the horizon, and for some distance up into the sky, the accumulated light from area villages etc. washes out any starlight, so there's a ring with no visible stars; and I'm sure that even looking straight up we're not seeing anything like what we should.
One thing about the spot on the hilltop that I was talking about is that you're out in the open, but I don't think you can see any direct lights at all from that point (streetlamps, lights on buildings and so on). You've got the woods on two sides, and an open field and the crest of a hill with a row of trees on the other sides. That won't sound unusual at all to you, I shouldn't think, but there aren't many spots like that in this area. (Not within walking distance of my flat late at night, anyway!) When it's clear, you can see the brighter stars OK - even down in town, you can still see the brighter stars and planets from outside my flat. I went up to this spot a few months ago at a similar time of night to watch one of the meteor showers, and saw five or six including some quite bright ones, and two at once at one point.

But when it's overcast, it's the fact that you can't see any direct lights that makes it obvious how bright the sky is - the trees are silhouetted against this uniform orange glowing background. It always surprises me how uniform the glow is; if it was just coming from Wycombe there would be a glow in half the sky but not the other half, so it's coming from Marlow and Beaconsfield and maybe even as far as Slough or Maidenhead as well.
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  #950  
Old 17 October 2018, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
This is the same hill I used to walk up and down every day on my way to and from work...
Uh huh... I assume this was though the massive snowdrifts that the southern England is famous for?
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  #951  
Old 17 October 2018, 05:28 PM
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Yes. I can directly see some lights from my place, but most of them are miles away on the other side of the lake; between the trees and the hills, there's nothing directly visible in three directions, especially in summer. And there's no large cities nearby, only villages, with the nearest one of those several miles away in a direct line. But the skyglow is apparent in all directions, just from all the accumulated light being put out. Without clouds it's not a visible glow, but I know it's there because the stars aren't visible anywhere near the horizon.
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  #952  
Old 17 October 2018, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Uh huh... I assume this was though the massive snowdrifts that the southern England is famous for?
You jest but it did snow quite heavily both winters I worked in that office...! Although "quite heavily" round here means about six inches to a foot at most, so even the drifts weren't very deep.

You did spot my deliberate mistake, though - obviously when I said I walked "up and down" the hill every day, I meant "uphill both ways" every day.
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  #953  
Old 17 October 2018, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
You jest but it did snow quite heavily both winters I worked in that office...! Although "quite heavily" round here means about six inches to a foot at most, so even the drifts weren't very deep.

You did spot my deliberate mistake, though - obviously when I said I walked "up and down" the hill every day, I meant "uphill both ways" every day.
"six inches to a foot" and "quite heavily" don't go together... if your snowdrifts are not 24 inches or more, it's merely a dusting..

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  #954  
Old 17 October 2018, 08:30 PM
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ASL ASL is offline
 
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Heavt breathing

If people don’t have snow tires and the local public works department doesn’t have enough snow plows to keep the roads clear, six inches in a day is more than enough to stop traffic and bring a city to a stand still.

Much as, I’m sure, people who live in cooler climates (where it may be common not to have AC) may have a different opinion of just how badly 90-degree (ETA: 32+ C, I suppose) heat is. Me? I’d laugh. Someone suffering from severe heat stroke in their uncooked living room, on the other hand, may have a different opinion.

Last edited by ASL; 17 October 2018 at 08:36 PM.
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  #955  
Old 17 October 2018, 08:42 PM
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WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASL View Post
Someone suffering from severe heat stroke in their uncooked living room, on the other hand, may have a different opinion.
I'm not sure how cooking one's living room would help, though.
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  #956  
Old 17 October 2018, 08:44 PM
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Well, uh, I mean... how dare you!
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  #957  
Old 18 October 2018, 12:55 AM
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I went for a hike today and I am apparently a prime residential opportunity for all spiders and beetles.

I just found of the the beetles on the coffee table, tragically upside-down, many hours later.

So goes the housing market, I suppose. What seems like an upscale, trendy new place just ends up deteriorating in value until you're out on your arse.
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  #958  
Old 18 October 2018, 02:58 AM
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Are you calling yourself an "upscale, trendy new place", Blatherskite, or did I misunderstand that part of your post?

(eta - Looking for a job at the moment, I understand the "deteriorating in value" part at least. I have definitely been deteriorating in value lately.)
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  #959  
Old 18 October 2018, 03:25 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Glasses

Two and a half hours at the dentist's yesterday, mostly head down in the chair (he was working on my upper teeth, and putting me head down was a better angle for him) made me amazingly tired. I slept most of the afternoon. My Fitbit thinks I slept through the appointment. I wish I had (pain was not the issue, noise and vibration were). I have a little ache today, from having my mouth open that long--even with a bite wedge to help, it was an effort.

Seaboe
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  #960  
Old 22 October 2018, 04:21 AM
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Gutter Monkey Gutter Monkey is offline
 
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Police

I was on the way to the shops at about 11pm last night when I spotted a parked car that had been broken into, so I called the local police station to give them all the details. There was an empty beer case in the back seat which I guess was what tempted the thief. The police officer on the line asked all the usual question about the location and the car's licence plate and make but when she asked "Can you tell if anything is missing?" I was very tempted to give a smartass answer because how the heck am I supposed to know that???
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