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Old 20 January 2016, 12:21 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Icon23 Gluten-free is total BS*

From celebrities like Miley Cyrus touting a gluten-free diet as the secret to her svelte bod to popular dessert spots like Sprinkles now offering gluten-free treats, it seems everyone is kicking gluten to the curb. A 2013 poll by consumer analysts NPD showed that 30 percent of all adults were trying to cut down or avoid gluten completely. Packaged Facts, a market research group, forecasts that the gluten-free food market will grow from $973 million in sales in 2014 to $2.3 billion by 2019. The gluten-free food market is expected to grow from $973 million in 2014 to $2.3 billion by 2019. But many nutritionists say a gluten-free diet is not the path to weight-loss success — and it can even be detrimental to your health.

http://nypost.com/2016/01/19/i-gaine...g-gluten-free/

*Please note - the headline pertains only to the 93% or so who do not have celiac disease or are not gluten intolerant (properly diagnosed, not self-diagnosed from anti-gluten propaganda).
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Old 20 January 2016, 01:13 PM
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Unfortunately, if I posted that link to my Facebook, I'd offend about 93%* of the people I know. I'd rather not offend them -- and no mere "science" will convince them. Most of them will eventually give it up anyway, as they have other fad eating patterns.

*May be a slight exaggeration.
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Old 20 January 2016, 01:32 PM
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What's with the glamour photos of two of the nutritionists quoted? [/hijack]
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Old 20 January 2016, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
What's with the glamour photos of two of the nutritionists quoted? [/hijack]

Lab coats don't photograph well.
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Old 20 January 2016, 02:25 PM
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I have one co-worker who avoids gluten without a diagnosis, but with good reason: she has multiple family members who have been diagnosed, she had the same symptoms after eating gluten that they had, and the symptoms stopped when she stopped eating it. And she discussed all this with her doctor.

It's actually a rather refreshing change from the faddists.
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Old 20 January 2016, 05:42 PM
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My mom tried to get me to give up gluten after she tried a six month stint without because one of her friends recommended it. I told her that, since I lacked any of the symptoms of gluten intolerance, I saw absolutely no reason to bother trying and furthermore, since she saw no change in her alleged gluten intolerance symptoms (which didn't actually match the real symptoms) within the first month there wasn't a point in her continuing past that. Five months later she actually believed me.
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Old 20 January 2016, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
What's with the glamour photos of two of the nutritionists quoted? [/hijack]
I think there is a perception that nutritionists have to look like their healthy diet is doing wonders for their appearance, or they don't know what they're talking about. It's a bit like a soft-looking personal trainer, a spotty dermatologist, or a plastic surgeon with a bad nose job, except moreso since nutrition can affect almost every aspect of your body. It's a field with a lot of conflicting evidence that is often spun into overly authoritative commercial propaganda about how people should eat, so discussions about nutrition are not always dominated by dispassionate analysis of scientific research.
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  #8  
Old 20 January 2016, 08:43 PM
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..., or a plastic surgeon with a bad nose job, ...
Not so much - "Of course, I have a terrible nose - I'm the best there is: I would not trust my body to anyone else and neither should you!"
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  #9  
Old 20 January 2016, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Not so much - "Of course, I have a terrible nose - I'm the best there is: I would not trust my body to anyone else and neither should you!"
While it doesn't directly showcase their own handiwork, usually top professionals will be acquainted with peers in their field, even if their only peers are in another part of the world. A professional should have the discernment to be able to tell who else in their field does good work, and make good judgments about who to trust.

This phenomenon of trusting people based on their looks, of course, leads to some negative consequences. People in fields like this who are naturally good-looking, through circumstances outside their control, may be treated as more competent than they really are.

It perpetuates a lot of nonsense in the area of health and fitness. Just because someone is in excellent shape doesn't mean they have everything figured out and know more about health than doctors. Many fitness people are prone to spreading myths, but because they have the discipline to work out a lot, eat well, and see results, people falsely assume that every idea they have about how that works has merit. If someone is in terrible shape, it could hint that their advice is flawed (or perhaps they just aren't able to implement it), but if they're in excellent shape it doesn't prove that their advice is not also flawed.
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Old 20 January 2016, 10:36 PM
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I was once referred to a nutritionist for a consult. She was quite overweight, which she pre-emptively explained was due to an under-active thyroid. My nutrition professor in college, however, was definitely of normal weight, but not at all some sort of "hot" prof.

But what is considered attractive now is not necessarily healthy, and that's been true for generations--it's just that what unhealthy things we consider attractive have changed.
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  #11  
Old 21 January 2016, 05:21 AM
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This quote in the article... oy...

Quote:
Nutritionist Peter Osborne, author of the forthcoming book “No Grain, No Pain,” falls into the anti-gluten camp. He believes the protein can lead to problems with the thyroid, skin and joints. “There’s no harm in not eating gluten or grain,” he says, shrugging off contrary claims. “It’s like any field of science: There are always two sides.”
Yea, there's a right side and a wrong side

For what it's worth though, the quote at the end of the article from the woman who has a whole family of gluten intolerance sufferers sounds pretty similar to a friend of mine in the same boat - he pointed out that for the time being, the gluten-free fad has given him a LOT more options for his diet.
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Old 21 January 2016, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Avril View Post
what is considered attractive now is not necessarily healthy, and that's been true for generations--it's just that what unhealthy things we consider attractive have changed.
I think it's at least as much or more like, what healthy things we consider unattractive have changed.

At any given time, especially for women (though currently increasingly so for men also), some limited portion of the wide range of normal healthy shapes seems to be considered attractive, at least according to the forces of fashion. The exact portion changes somewhat; but at any given time leaves out a lot of people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebochan View Post
This quote in the article... oy...

Quote:
“It’s like any field of science: There are always two sides.”
Yea, there's a right side and a wrong side
Most issues have more like somewhere between three and three hundred twentyseven sides.

Some of them may nevertheless be just plain objectively wrong.
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Old 10 June 2016, 02:49 AM
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Some years ago, I visited an uncle who suffered from Multiple Sclerosis. He fixed lunch, and along with the soup, which was pretty good, he also gave me some bread he had made with gluten free ingredients. He said there was talk in the MS support group he participated in that going gluten free helped manage the symptoms of the disease.

It was terrible.

Tastless and hard to eat. He asked what I thought of it. Being the good nephew, I lied and said "Not bad!"

He gave me more.
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Old 10 June 2016, 03:05 AM
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Originally Posted by DrRocket View Post
Some years ago, I visited an uncle who suffered from Multiple Sclerosis. He fixed lunch, and along with the soup, which was pretty good, he also gave me some bread he had made with gluten free ingredients. He said there was talk in the MS support group he participated in that going gluten free helped manage the symptoms of the disease.
My mom also has MS and avoids gluten. I don't know if it's valid, but I stay out of it. Normally she'll just not have bread rather than have gluten free bread, since it is pretty bad. She makes "pizza" with dehydrated cauliflower crust that is actually palatable, though.
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Old 10 June 2016, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Errata View Post
Normally she'll just not have bread rather than have gluten free bread, since it is pretty bad. She makes "pizza" with dehydrated cauliflower crust that is actually palatable, though.
I think that there are some foods that just can't be replicated in alternate forms. At this point, gluten-free bread seems to be one of those things, though the gluten-free followers in my life do say that it has much improved in the last few years.
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Old 10 June 2016, 02:00 PM
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I'd like to introduce all three of you to the 5b's Bakery. The owner and two (I think) of her three children have celiac, and she wanted to eat all the things she missed. Now, I grant you, I had her cinnamon roll rather than regular bread, but it was wonderful. I'd put it up against Cinnabon any day.

Seaboe
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Old 10 June 2016, 11:32 PM
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What I find weird is that, even though lactose intolerance is far more prevalent that gluten intolerance, dairy-free options are often lumped together with gluten-free options. I find that a lot of cafés now have a gluten-free cake on the menu and this is often the only dairy-free choice as well - assuming it even is dairy-free as well. Quite often I've found places with gluten-free options but nothing for cow-avoiders

I realise that it's easier to avoid dairy than it is to avoid gluten, but you'd think that businesses that care enough to provide gluten-free products would care enough to keep a carton of soya milk in the fridge.

It's also frustrating to go through vegan recipes and find a lot of coconut flour or almond flour on the ingredients lists. Gluten has nothing whatsoever to do with veganism.

I just want no meat and no dairy, damnit! Wheat is not an animal product!

Don't even get me started on 'paleo' diets. I mean, how is xylitol paleolithic? Why is grinding oats in a blender more 'paleo' than using wheat flour?
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Old 11 June 2016, 02:23 PM
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I avoid caffeine and alcohol on doctor's orders and nothing else. Why? Because for a while I had to avoid lots of things on doctor's orders and it was a special kind of misery. I was extremely ill in college for about a year. During that time, while trying to get a diagnosis and then after it in treatment, I had to avoid dairy, wheat, anything spicy, and fat along with caffeine and alcohol. I was also supposed to minimize the amount of meat I ate, though with the restriction on fat and dairy that meant a pretty narrow band of protein sources. I was, however, encouraged to eat rice in all forms, so I guess there was that.

Avoiding stuff was a special kind of misery I can't imagine doing just by choice. I vividly remember being at a party and making people concerned because I was already quite thin and all I was eating was a plate of celery and carrot sticks with no dip or anything. I was doing it because it was literally the only thing there I was allowed to eat, but my friends were on the verge of staging an intervention! Meanwhile, I would have loved to have had what they were having. I fantasized about macaroni and cheese nearly every day.
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Old 13 June 2016, 01:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Blatherskite View Post
What I find weird is that, even though lactose intolerance is far more prevalent that gluten intolerance, dairy-free options are often lumped together with gluten-free options. I find that a lot of cafés now have a gluten-free cake on the menu and this is often the only dairy-free choice as well - assuming it even is dairy-free as well. Quite often I've found places with gluten-free options but nothing for cow-avoiders

I realise that it's easier to avoid dairy than it is to avoid gluten, but you'd think that businesses that care enough to provide gluten-free products would care enough to keep a carton of soya milk in the fridge.

It's also frustrating to go through vegan recipes and find a lot of coconut flour or almond flour on the ingredients lists. Gluten has nothing whatsoever to do with veganism.

I just want no meat and no dairy, damnit! Wheat is not an animal product!

Don't even get me started on 'paleo' diets. I mean, how is xylitol paleolithic? Why is grinding oats in a blender more 'paleo' than using wheat flour?
Silly Blatherskite don't you know lactose intolerance is sooo 90's (or is it 80's) you are meant to avoid gluten now!! ....

or eat like a caveman or something. Or carbs no it is fat.... no wait it is carbs. Of course while there are some people that change what they avoid with the trend there are others that accumulate what they are meant to avoid, I predict in the future there will be nothing that they believe that they can eat.

I have posted here before about going to a get together with another online group. We were all meant to bring something to share and one of the group presented a dish and said "It is gluten free so it is good for us" It was earily days of the trend so I wasn't sure of the science so I didn't say anything. Well that and it was the first time I had meet them so I didn't want to start an argument. Anyway a few years ago I told the story at work at morning-tea and someone said "yeah because it could still be high in fat and sugar" and I said "yes but also if you don't have celiac disease it doesn't make any difference". A circle of blank, confused faces staring at me.
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