snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Non-UL Chat > The Bad Gastronomer

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03 August 2018, 03:30 PM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Icon23 Sous Vide

I did a search and did not get any returns, so maybe I'm the only one on the board trying this. Or maybe my search ability isn't great.

Anyway, I am attempting to sous vide a beef loin roast today. I was cleaning out the freezer and found a roast in there that I had basically forgotten. It has been in there since last November, so we decided we had best use it.

I also found a good deal on a sous vide circulator. I've been thinking about this for a while, so I decided to go for it. It arrived yesterday, so we are ready to start the cooking.

Last night, I uncovered the roast and sprinkled on some kosher salt. It sat overnight in the fridge. This morning, I put a dry rub on the meat, put it, some garlic and herbs in a bag, and put it in the pot. Found out quickly I had punctured the bag, so I got the meat out, dried everything off, and started again. This time, I double bagged it. The circulator was bringing the water up to temp (130 F), and I put the bag in. Just enough buoyancy from the bags that it was floating, so I put a spoon in between the two bags and it sank. Water up to temp, sealed bag sitting in the water, pot on the counter - everything is going.

And, now we wait. This is for lunch tomorrow. When it is done, I'll make some side dishes - it's sweet corn season here, so some of that, and whatever else looks good when I hit the farm tonight. Then I'll get a pan smoking hot and sear the outside of the meat. I have no idea if this will be a disappointment, or a revelation.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03 August 2018, 03:35 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 18,742
Glasses

What does sous vide mean in cooking?


Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03 August 2018, 03:43 PM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,193
Default

When I've seen it done on cooking shows, the meat has always been vacuum sealed. Is there any air in the bag(s)? (You mentioned it floating up...) If so, wouldn't that insulate it from the heat to some extent? I'd be careful about checking what temperature it has reached, I think. Still, it sounds interesting, and I look forward to seeing the results.

How much did the circulator cost?

Seaboe: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03 August 2018, 04:46 PM
GenYus234's Avatar
GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 26,269
Default

How about some Mexican street corn?

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...es-recipe.html
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03 August 2018, 09:33 PM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Default

The air was as removed as we could get it. I did the bit where you leave a corner of the bag open, lower it into water to push all the air out, and seal it. The bag was clinging to the meat. And by floating, I mean one little corner was at the top of the water. I just wanted to ensure that none of it was above the water. As to the heat, we set it a few degrees above what we are looking for. I'm actually looking for the meat to be around 125-127, since we all like rare meat.

The circulator was $100. It is one that can be controlled from the unit, rather than done solely by an app. I would be a bit worried that they would stop supporting the app one day rendering the unit worthless if I went with a fully app controlled one. They can range from anywhere around $60-$500, from what I've found.

And that street corn looks good. I was planning on grilling the corn, but hadn't given any consideration to it beyond that. I think I'll see if I can pull that off. Thanks for the link!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03 August 2018, 10:34 PM
Tootsie Plunkette's Avatar
Tootsie Plunkette Tootsie Plunkette is offline
 
Join Date: 26 October 2001
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 10,070
Chef

May I add a side query to this thread? (I'm going to, anyway...)

We're intrigued by the Instant Pot but have yet to purchase one. I have, more than once, put one in my Amazon cart when they've had a special deal running, only to back out before sealing the deal. I know at least one person who has one and loves it, but we have a crock pot (that we rarely use), and a pressure cooker (that we use occasionally), and we had a rice pot that was crap so we tossed it. Do we need another appliance? Is it really that special?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04 August 2018, 01:42 AM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Default

I have an Instant Pot, and I love it. If you didn't have a pressure cooker, I'd say to definitely get one. But if you have and like your pressure cooker, I'm not sure if an IP would be worthwhile.
Is it an older pressure cooker that you do on the stove? If so, then the IP is easier. It works well as a rice cooker - the first time I used it to cook some, I made better rice than I ever had before. The most common thing for me to make in it are various form of potatoes, meat that I want to shred, and chocolate lava cakes. We probably use it 2-4 times a month. For the meats, if I want some shredded chicken tacos, I can go super easy and spice a chicken breast and throw it and some salsa in, seal it up, push poultry, and wait until it's done. I think that's probably easier than the stove top type, but if you are comfortable with the stove top, I doubt this would be life changing.

I am home, and everything seems to be going well on the sous vide front. I'm not sure if I could tell by now if it wasn't, though, so I will continue to wait.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04 August 2018, 03:04 AM
Dasla's Avatar
Dasla Dasla is offline
 
Join Date: 15 April 2010
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
How about some Mexican street corn?

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...es-recipe.html
Thanks for this GenYus. corn on the cob was on special when I was at the supermarket just now (three cobs for $2or something like that) and I am over just having it on the cob (I ate it like that a lot when I was kid and a teenager) and still have some corn salsa left in the fridge so I wasn't interested in doing that. I was going to be looking in my cookbooks for something different the Snopes board comes through. I have pretty much all those ingredients in the fridge right now (I will just have to sour the cream).
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05 August 2018, 12:32 AM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Default

The roast was way better than it should have been for the cut of meat, so it seems to be a success. Both of the double bags ended up leaking though, so to do this again I need a better bag. We will probably try again with steaks, because we won't have enough people together for another roast for a little while.
And the corn was really good, so thank you for that.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05 August 2018, 03:32 PM
DawnStorm's Avatar
DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
Join Date: 11 March 2003
Location: Montgomery County, MD
Posts: 16,667
Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
What does sous vide mean in cooking?


Seaboe
Wiki entry.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08 August 2018, 04:00 PM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Default

So the final verdict is that sous vide was a definite success. The leaking bags made the outer slices not as good as they could have been. But once we got past that, it was great. I ended up slicing most of the meat really thin for sandwiches. I took a cold sandwich to work - a little bit of mayo and mustard, some lettuce and pickles, and the beef on a deli roll. Probably the best roast beef sandwich I've ever had. My wife caramelized some onions and made a French Dip with some, and she said it was incredible.
I have a vacuum sealer on the way (those are way cheaper than I expected), and the weekend after this one we are going to make some tenderloin steaks.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08 August 2018, 08:19 PM
musicgeek's Avatar
musicgeek musicgeek is offline
 
Join Date: 01 August 2005
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 5,672
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
So the final verdict is that sous vide was a definite success. The leaking bags made the outer slices not as good as they could have been. But once we got past that, it was great. I ended up slicing most of the meat really thin for sandwiches. I took a cold sandwich to work - a little bit of mayo and mustard, some lettuce and pickles, and the beef on a deli roll. Probably the best roast beef sandwich I've ever had. My wife caramelized some onions and made a French Dip with some, and she said it was incredible.
I have a vacuum sealer on the way (those are way cheaper than I expected), and the weekend after this one we are going to make some tenderloin steaks.
I love our vacuum sealer - our first one remains the only thing I bought directly from a TV ad, before they were widely available in stores. I've been thinking about trying sous vide for a while, and I think based on your recommendation I may take the plunge.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 21 August 2018, 06:10 PM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,573
Default

We did steaks over the weekend with the sous vide circulator, and they were amazing. We got some tenderloin, about 2 inches thick and between 6-8 ounces. Vacuum sealed them, then put them in at 125 for an hour while we made some sides. Got a cast iron pan smoking hot, got the steaks out, and seared them for about 20 seconds a side. Nicely browned outside, and rare from edge to edge. One of the best, if not the best steak we have ever had.
Next up - getting a blow torch to facilitate browning!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.