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  #41  
Old 09 October 2014, 12:01 AM
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Thanks for that GaryM, I was just reading this thread trying to remember where we had that exact conversation.
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  #42  
Old 09 October 2014, 01:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
Since it has been mentioned twice that maple syrup is available in Sweden, and knowing how expensive it is even in the states that produce it, got me to wondering if the Sugar Maple tree grows in Europe, or have trees been imported to Northern Europe so it can be processed locally? I can't imagine how much it would cost if it was shipped overseas for sale. Probably about as much as good caviar is here.Would you like it better if we called it Polenta?
You can buy real Canadian maple syrup here in Australia, just in regular supermarkets alongside the fake maple syrup and the chocolate sauce etc etc. It's about $9 for a 250ml bottle.

While we can't get grits (well, maybe you can, but it's not a regular supermarket item afaik), we do get pop-tarts, pancake mix, Mexican dinner kits and supplies (Old El Paso, Mission, and home brands), miniature variety pack of kids sugary cereals, Rice Krispies treats (I think they're the same as what are called LCMs on our shelves... yep http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_Krispies_Treats), root beer (Australian Bundaberg brand), BBQ sauce. We cannot get pumpkin pie filling in a can. I know that frustrates American visitors to our shores. It just doesn't exist here. Pumpkins here are something you roast and have with dinner alongside potatoes, not something you bake into a sweet dessert pie. That said, I wish you could get it. Sounds delicious. You can't get pumpkin spice lattes either.
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  #43  
Old 09 October 2014, 01:25 AM
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I haven't seen pumpkin filling in a can here lately. We used to have it at specialty imports stores. (We can get some fresh orange pumpkin, though, and making pumpkin filling is tedious but not difficult. The green varieties aren't bad for it either.)

The maple syrup prices are comparable - 600 or 700 yen for a small bottle.

I find it very hard to believe you can't get grits in NJ. Is that really true? I would search for it here - I'm sure it's available at an import store somewhere - but I'm the only one in the family who really likes it.
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  #44  
Old 09 October 2014, 01:33 AM
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I find it hard to believe you can't get grits in NJ. I don't like grits, but I am fairly certain I can get them at the grocery store. There are also chain restaurants, like Cracker Barrel which have them on the menu regardless of what part of the country you are in.
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  #45  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:36 AM
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There are grits available at regular grocery stores here.
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  #46  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:40 AM
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I should clarify. I can buy a large package of grits. I can't (as easily) buy a reasonable-sized package of instant grits to mail to a Swedish person who might not, in the end, like grits. I told her I'd keep looking and next time I saw the packets, I'd send her some.

But grits are, indeed, difficult to find, at least more so than a whole host of other things. I can get a zillion varieties of pierogie; I never even knew what they were until I moved here. Etc.
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  #47  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:40 AM
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I'd imagine Quaker Grits aren't even made in the South.

But grits are like rice; too bland to eat plain. They at least need butter and salt & pepper, if not cheese, chopped scallions, bacon bits, etc. Problem I have with ordering them out is they seem to be either too runny or too dry.
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  #48  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kia View Post
We cannot get pumpkin pie filling in a can. I know that frustrates American visitors to our shores. It just doesn't exist here. Pumpkins here are something you roast and have with dinner alongside potatoes, not something you bake into a sweet dessert pie. That said, I wish you could ying get it. Sounds delicious. You can't get pumpkin spice lattes either.
The spices for the pie is cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and allspice. The canned pumpkin pie filling is just pureed pumpkin with sweetening and spices already added, so you could just cook down your own fresh pumpkin, add eggs, spices, condensed milk and sweetening (some people use maple syrup!) Anyway, I guess I'm saying you don't really need the canned stuff. Heck, you don't really even need the crust. I used to make pumpkin custard when I was on the low-carb diet. Yummy!
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  #49  
Old 09 October 2014, 03:18 AM
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Originally Posted by erwins View Post
There are grits available at regular grocery stores here.
According to Southerners I've known, it's impossible to get "real" grits west of the Mississippi.

Not like I can tell any difference, though.
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  #50  
Old 09 October 2014, 03:20 AM
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I am from the South originally, but I'm not a fan of grits, so I haven't really paid attention to the specifics. I do seem to recall that what I've seen might have been quick grits.
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  #51  
Old 09 October 2014, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
you could just cook down your own fresh pumpkin, add eggs, spices, condensed milk and sweetening
This will also work quite well with most winter squash -- some of them, IMO, make better "pumpkin" pie than pumpkins do. But I would use evaporated milk, not condensed milk; especially if you're adding other sweetening.

If you are using fresh pumpkin, make sure it's pie pumpkin. Jackolantern pumpkins are bred for looks, not flavor or texture, and are mostly useless for pie.
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  #52  
Old 09 October 2014, 01:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
Would you like it better if we called it Polenta?
Polenta isn't corn that's been soaked in lye, first.

Generally, polenta is yellow and sweeter (to my taste buds), whereas grits are white and not sweet. I do like corn bread and make it often though.

OY
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  #53  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:10 PM
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Polenta is more like cornmeal mush.
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  #54  
Old 09 October 2014, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
...you could just cook down your own fresh pumpkin, add eggs, spices, condensed milk and sweetening (some people use maple syrup!)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
But I would use evaporated milk, not condensed milk; especially if you're adding other sweetening.
Or just use fresh milk, which is what I do. I have never used canned pie filling for a pie. I use canned pumpkin because I decided it was a pain in the patootie to make my own (it wasn't difficult, just irritating).

I do make a chiffon pie rather than a custard (the only difference is that you beat the egg whites separately and fold them in), and no matter how deep dish the pie pans, there is always filling left over that I bake in a custard dish for my lacto-ovo vegetarian almost-niece (my pie crust has lard in it).

Seaboe
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  #55  
Old 09 October 2014, 04:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kia View Post
You can buy real Canadian maple syrup here in Australia, just in regular supermarkets alongside the fake maple syrup and the chocolate sauce etc etc. It's about $9 for a 250ml bottle.
Oddly enough, it is not much cheaper here.
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  #56  
Old 09 October 2014, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UEL View Post
Oddly enough, it is not much cheaper here.
Yeah, I would suspect that the density of value and shelf life means that shipping costs are not a huge factor in inflating the price internationally. Import/export taxes may or may not be.
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  #57  
Old 09 October 2014, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
According to Southerners I've known, it's impossible to get "real" grits west of the Mississippi.
If "real" means the non-instant kind that have to be cooked for 20 min, Trader Joe's used to have them but they've since been discontinued. Since they stopped selling them I've resorted to ordering them through Amazon.com. Those are produced in South Carolina.
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  #58  
Old 09 October 2014, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
I haven't been to Scandinavia, nor do I have a photographic memory of the grocery stores I've been in elsewhere in Europe, so I'm just listing some foods that I think may be more distinctly American:

grits
real maple syrup
pancake mix
pop tarts
bizarre children's breakfast cereals, miniature variety pack
Rice Krispies treats
can of pumpkin pie filling
root beer
BBQ sauce
Don't bother with these:

real maple syrup
pancake mix
Rice Krispies treats
BBQ sauce

The basic problem is that we are fairly international in our food habits here. We love to adopt interesting food (and then go monster garage on it...).

I live in a small town (50 000 inhabitants), and we have (at least) 6 Thai places, 2 Chinese, at least a a dozen pizza places, 2 non-pizza Italian places, 2 sushi places, 2 American places, 2 Lebanese places, 1 Indian place, 1 taco place, a few kebab places (often combined with pizza places), a bunch of salad places. On top of that, we have a bunch of typical Swedish places (but often inspired by foreign food) and the ordinary fast food chains (McDonalds, Burger King, Subway, Max (Swedish hamburger chain), Sibylla (the most traditional of all fast food chains in Sweden)).

Also, the main US brands are also sold here, such as Nestle, Kelloggs, Coke, Pepsi, McDonalds and so on.

So, I think you'll have to go with the slightly odd stuff.
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  #59  
Old 09 October 2014, 06:52 PM
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I have no idea what they meant by "real" other than it giving the a chance to show their disdain for what they could find.
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  #60  
Old 09 October 2014, 07:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
I'm not too sure I'd want to inflict a Swedish friend with the gawd-awful taste of grits. [my opinion].

OY
OY! You wound me!

I was born in Philadelphia, PA. but I have been in the south since I was 7 years old....

I must say that a breakfast without grits is merely a morning snack. So much so, that at the fire station, grits are considered the "base" of the meal, with the eggs, bacon and biscuits (often with gravy) being the accents.

Grits are THE go to staple of a good southern breakfast!

Jake

Last edited by Atlanta Jake; 09 October 2014 at 07:37 PM. Reason: correcting a misconception
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