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  #41  
Old 20 July 2018, 01:24 AM
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Hans, I don't know if it's an auto correct error, but your last post consistently refers to a town called Komono. I was pretty sure we were all talking about Kokomo.
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  #42  
Old 20 July 2018, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
Hans, I don't know if it's an auto correct error, but your last post consistently refers to a town called Komono. I was pretty sure we were all talking about Kokomo.
That would be my stupid fingers!

Iíll add a proof reading note to the manuscript! Kokomo is correct!
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  #43  
Old 20 July 2018, 01:03 PM
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"A town called Kimono" would be a great name for a band. Maybe they're based in Deer Creek.
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  #44  
Old 24 July 2018, 11:42 AM
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Next question research minions.

What is on a Birth Certificate issued in the united states (Indiana specifically) in June 1941? are there any footprints or other data on there?*

*This is not a phishing scam, our protagonist has, much to his surprise, been presented with a scanned copy of his birth certificate. What does he see? What information is on there?

Assume he was born in a hospital and both parents were present for the issue.
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  #45  
Old 24 July 2018, 01:11 PM
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FWIW, my birth certificate from the early 1950's in New York State lists name, sex (nobody was separating sex and gender at the time), date of birth, county, city, and filing date. It's signed by the Registar of Vital Statistics, and has an embossed seal, and a number. It's in black type (except that the number is red and the signature appears handwritten, though I'm pretty sure that this is an official copy made later) on a yellow piece of paper about 8 inches by 5 inches.

I suspect that this varied state by state. In 1941 I wouldn't be surprised if some states listed a racial category, though the dividing lines would probably have been different than thay are now -- on a fast google some states were still doing that at least through the 1980's and maybe later! -- so I think that yes, you're going to need to find out what was on specifically Indiana's birth certificates.

A 1970's mindset, by the way, would be unlikely to be thinking about identity theft or related scams. There were certainly scammers around; but I don't remember anybody worrying about identity theft until significantly later. So your character may be pretty vulnerable to those. (You may already know that, but I thought I'd throw it in.)
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  #46  
Old 24 July 2018, 01:17 PM
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Thanks for that. Iíll need to see if I can find an Indianan certificate format.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
A 1970's mindset, by the way, would be unlikely to be thinking about identity theft or related scams. There were certainly scammers around; but I don't remember anybody worrying about identity theft until significantly later. So your character may be pretty vulnerable to those. (You may already know that, but I thought I'd throw it in.)
My quip about identity theft was for the benefit of contributes here rather than my protagonist!
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  #47  
Old 24 July 2018, 01:19 PM
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Some tidbits of info that could be listed on an Indiana birth certificate from the era in question: https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=60871

~Psihala
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  #48  
Old 24 July 2018, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Psihala View Post
Some tidbits of info that could be listed on an Indiana birth certificate from the era in question: https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=60871

~Psihala
Perfect. Thank you!
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  #49  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:04 PM
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FYI - something I learned when I misplaced my birth certificate:

I'm not sure about Indiana, but in New York "official copies" can differ wildly from the original document, even if they contain the same information. That is, they are newly prepared documents, not photographic reproductions of the original.

If this is the same in Indiana, then whether it's a scan of the original 1941 document or a scan of an official copy issued years later may come into play.

I also have a much fancier "birth certificate" issued by the hospital. This is the one with a footprint. I doubt it has the same weight as the state-issued one, but it would look prettier on the wall.
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  #50  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:08 PM
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Thatís interesting. I didnít dream up the footprint thing!

Is it /was it common to get two certificates? Is the Hospital one considered equally official an authoratative as the state issued one? If not what is the purpose of them?
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  #51  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:16 PM
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The hospital one IS NOT official, it is more of an birth announcement then on official state document. You must register with the state for the official one, which is usually handled automatically by hospital staff.

But if there where unusual circumstances to the birth, such as a home birth or other birth outside of a hospital setting, then the parent would be responsible to making sure the birth is registered.
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  #52  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans Off View Post
Assume he was born in a hospital and both parents were present for the issue.
His father may have been at the hospital, although I believe that in 1941 he was highly unlikely to be in the room for the actual birth.

Just in case you were wondering.

Seaboe
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  #53  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
His father may have been at the hospital, although I believe that in 1941 he was highly unlikely to be in the room for the actual birth.

Just in case you were wondering.

Seaboe
I was presuming a corridor pacing nervous pipe smoking trope.
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  #54  
Old 24 July 2018, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iskinner View Post
The hospital one IS NOT official, it is more of an birth announcement then on official state document. You must register with the state for the official one, which is usually handled automatically by hospital staff.

But if there where unusual circumstances to the birth, such as a home birth or other birth outside of a hospital setting, then the parent would be responsible to making sure the birth is registered.
So more like a receipt for services rendered
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  #55  
Old 24 July 2018, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
His father may have been at the hospital, although I believe that in 1941 he was highly unlikely to be in the room for the actual birth...
Agreed, I was born in Indianapolis in 1965. My dad was present, but it was extremely rare at the time and only happened because my uncle was a doctor at that hospital.

My birth certificate, again from 1965, has my foot print on it.
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  #56  
Old 24 July 2018, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
FWIW, my birth certificate from the early 1950's in New York State lists name, sex (nobody was separating sex and gender at the time), date of birth, county, city, and filing date. It's signed by the Registar of Vital Statistics, and has an embossed seal, and a number. It's in black type (except that the number is red and the signature appears handwritten, though I'm pretty sure that this is an official copy made later) on a yellow piece of paper about 8 inches by 5 inches.

I suspect that this varied state by state. In 1941 I wouldn't be surprised if some states listed a racial category, though the dividing lines would probably have been different than thay are now -- on a fast google some states were still doing that at least through the 1980's and maybe later! -- so I think that yes, you're going to need to find out what was on specifically Indiana's birth certificates.
I had a coworker born in Atlanta, Georgia around 1950. Reportedly her birth certificate just said baby girl, black, plus all the other details. No name. I would expect there would have been a subsequent certificate that gave her name.
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  #57  
Old 25 July 2018, 01:57 PM
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My grandmother's name was misspelled (or wrong; I'm a little unclear as to which) on my mother's original birth certificate, and it wasn't discovered until my mother was trying to get a passport in 1946.

Seaboe
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  #58  
Old 31 July 2018, 11:41 AM
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Default Next item.

Ok here is a quick one. Suggestions please.

It’s 1976, you are 21 years old, female from central Indiana, with modest means about to start teacher training.

Your car is beloved, if somewhat unreliable, pale blue convertable that you enjoy going on road trips and nights out with your girlfriends.

What make and model is it please?

(I did come up with one, but it’s a bit clichťd and I’m not sure it would be correct)


Thanks all!

Last edited by Hans Off; 31 July 2018 at 11:41 AM. Reason: added Indiana
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  #59  
Old 31 July 2018, 01:01 PM
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Despite having in 1976 been a 26 year old female of modest means, I'm not going to be much help on this, because I was never much into cars. However, it would almost certainly have been an American make; and as she hasn't much money she would also almost certainly have bought it used, because IIRC convertibles were generally more expensive than standard top cars. That goes along with the 'unreliable' part, of course.

In 1976 I think it would probably have had seatbelts (only lap belts in the back, maybe shoulder in the front), but they're probably not using them, and they'd most likely have worked their way down under the seats. If you want to show one character as particularly cautious or conscientious or sensible, you could have that person dig them out and put them on.

(I was driving a SAAB 95, but that was because my parents gave it to me; they happened to live near a dealer. And aside from not being a convertible, that was an extremely unusual make in the USA, even near the coasts, and would have been extraordinary in Indiana.)
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  #60  
Old 31 July 2018, 01:52 PM
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Oh definitely American, and far from new.

The unreliability puts this car pretty much on itís last legs engine wise (it has a rattle)

Also they are not wearing belts, at one point the two characters in the front have a minor falling out so one climbs over the seats to join the third companion in the back.

(One of two reasons that it has to be a convertable, the other reason is fantastically specific*, but I canít really discuss that here!)


*Although I didnít realise that until after I wrote the kicker passage from this section, itís almost as if I planned it all along, but it just fell out of my head!
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