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  #21  
Old 30 June 2009, 02:06 AM
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chillas chillas is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey View Post
Yes. You'd think the original writer would know sashimi is fish.
I don't think the original writer would know that his ass is not a hole in the ground. There were some bizarre statements in the OP, the sort that make you think the writer has only a nodding relationship with reality.
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  #22  
Old 30 June 2009, 02:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Morning View Post
Ketchup on rice? That is more odd than soy or curry. Of course where I grew up, one prepared rice with brown sugar, so who am I to question.

Morning
Well, if this did originate in Southeast Asia, it makes more sense, as there are a lot of sauces that go under the name of Ketchup there that bear little resemblance to the stuff by Heinz that most Americans immediately think of.
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  #23  
Old 30 June 2009, 04:56 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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FWIW, There isn't a lot of sushi in southeast asia, maybe about the same as the US or less. So the same sort of misunderstandings persist. (Although I don't think the "sushi-sashimi" mix up is such a big deal. For example, sushi isn't always rice, either, by the way.)
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  #24  
Old 30 June 2009, 08:09 AM
BamaRainbow BamaRainbow is offline
 
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Whoever wrote that OP would probably have his/her/its head explode to learn that an incredibly popular way of eating rice in the US (maybe it's just the South) is to use cooked rice, mix some eggs and milk and loads of sugar (brown works VERY nicely) and spices and throw in some raisins, and bake it for an hour or so. Then when it's finished, spoon out a nice bowlful (while it's nice and warm-hot), pour in a little milk, sprinkle a little more sugar on top, and pig out. (It works just as well when served cold but that "fresh out of the oven" taste just can't be beat.)
Incidentally, since cooked rice was a standard part of every traditional Sunday dinner in the South (whether the meat was ham or pork chops or chicken or even beef*), it was almost a guarantee that there would be a lot of extra rice for mom or grandma to start up a rice pudding (to be eaten later that night).

*Usually the only time beef wouldn't be served with rice would be in hamburger form. Most other forms of beef--whether steak or roast beef or pot roast or even meat loaf--worked quite well with rice.
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  #25  
Old 30 June 2009, 08:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BamaRainbow View Post
Incidentally, since cooked rice was a standard part of every traditional Sunday dinner in the South
Good thing it's cooked. You can't eat it raw, you know.
Quote:
(whether the meat was ham or pork chops or chicken or even beef*), it was almost a guarantee that there would be a lot of extra rice for mom or grandma to start up a rice pudding (to be eaten later that night).
Boy, do I miss rice pudding. I've tried to make it here but it's just not the same without long-grain rice. I'm going to have to go get some Uncle Ben's at the import store.

Completely OT: I made pumpkin pie a few weeks ago. It was like gold. But almost as expensive because I had to get everything at the import store. (We've got plenty of pumpkin and other ingredients just not quite the right kind.)
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  #26  
Old 30 June 2009, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
For example, sushi isn't always rice, either, by the way.)
Okay, now I'm confused. It was my understanding that "sushi" refered specifically to the vinegar rice - that the rice was the one "required" ingredient to be called sushi.
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  #27  
Old 01 July 2009, 01:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
Good thing it's cooked. You can't eat it raw, you know. Boy, do I miss rice pudding. I've tried to make it here but it's just not the same without long-grain rice. I'm going to have to go get some Uncle Ben's at the import store.
I've always made rice pudding (well, my mother has) with short grain sticky rice! I'm really surprised to hear about it made with "American" long grain rice!
I'm tempted to try it now. Short grain rice is about 4 times more expensive in Ireland!
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  #28  
Old 01 July 2009, 02:42 AM
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Originally Posted by chillas View Post
Okay, now I'm confused. It was my understanding that "sushi" refered specifically to the vinegar rice - that the rice was the one "required" ingredient to be called sushi.
Well, for all modern intents, there's nothing wrong with that deifinition, I suppose. Sushi was originally fermented food (especially fish) so there are still fermented foods called sushi. We have one in a nearby prefecture called funazushi, which is fermented fish. (Think fish blue cheese.) However, it is fermented with rice so it passes that test. Last night, the missus and I (plus smallish Ganz) tried to think of some modern foods that are still called sushi that don't have any rice. We spent all of five minutes pondering this deep question and couldn't come up with any so your definition stands.

My point was simply that it's pointless to argue about the exact meaning of words that have already changed so much, sort of like saying "Well, that's not a pudding!" Well, what's a pudding? What it means to one English speaker at one time and place is already so totally different from another. ("It has to have eggs!") Frankly, I think it's a bit of a nitpick is all.
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  #29  
Old 01 July 2009, 07:54 AM
BamaRainbow BamaRainbow is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
Good thing it's cooked. You can't eat it raw, you know. Boy, do I miss rice pudding. I've tried to make it here but it's just not the same without long-grain rice. I'm going to have to go get some Uncle Ben's at the import store.
Well, I noted the "cooked" part specifically because most rice pudding recipes start off with cooked rice (that's typically in the ingredient list). Also, the traditional rice pudding was made with the leftover rice from Sunday dinner (which, of course, was cooked rice).
I imagine some people have made rice puddings using uncooked rice, but it seems like a major waste of time (unless you don't already have leftover rice).
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  #30  
Old 01 July 2009, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BamaRainbow View Post
Well, I noted the "cooked" part specifically because most rice pudding recipes start off with cooked rice (that's typically in the ingredient list). Also, the traditional rice pudding was made with the leftover rice from Sunday dinner (which, of course, was cooked rice).
I imagine some people have made rice puddings using uncooked rice, but it seems like a major waste of time (unless you don't already have leftover rice).
When I was a kid, I usually made it with raw rice. We never had any rice leftover... We almost never had anything leftover! (With raw rice, you don't necessarily have to cook the rice beforehand. Just have to cook it a long time in th'oven.)
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  #31  
Old 01 July 2009, 09:08 AM
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ChibiHamster ChibiHamster is offline
 
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My point was just that, in an article which was advising people not to eat rice, sushi seemed a bad choice as an example of an alternative, since most people I know would think of sushi as fish and rice.
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  #32  
Old 01 July 2009, 09:17 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChibiHamster View Post
My point was just that, in an article which was advising people not to eat rice, sushi seemed a bad choice as an example of an alternative, since most people I know would think of sushi as fish and rice.
You're right. I just wanted to mention the context of the OP. The sushi talk is highly parenthetical. Sushi has lots of rice.
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  #33  
Old 02 July 2009, 07:46 PM
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Okay, first meat was teh ebil, then milk was a deadly poison, then we were supposed to avoid grain becuase if contained gluten and would make your kids autistic (unless vaccinating your kids against fatal diseases was what was making them autistic) and now rice is the source of all the world's pain and misery? I should have noticed. Because....


What's white and crawls up your leg?



Uncle Ben's perverted rice.
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  #34  
Old 03 July 2009, 05:51 PM
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DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
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I had some rice and chicken for dinner last evening; that Uncle Ben knows where to get the good stuff! I also foisted some of this deadly drug on my unsuspecting husband, who promptly ate it.

Dawn--and only 4 days before our anniversary too!--Storm
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