snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > Politics

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 03 July 2014, 02:44 PM
UEL's Avatar
UEL UEL is offline
 
Join Date: 01 August 2004
Location: Fredericton, Canada
Posts: 9,384
Baseball

Quote:
Originally Posted by htonl View Post
When I was in the US, there was one bar that wouldn't accept my (South African) passport as ID, but would accept my US visa that was in the passport.

edit: but of course as a British citizen you probably don't need a visa.
The only time I had questionable ID issues was flying out of Wichita, Kansas. I was flying from Wichita to get back to New Brunswick. There, the TSA agents had a stand on the way towards security where you had to produce ID. I suppose Wichita does not get many international travellers, so when I produced my passport (the green government issued one), the agent did not know how to deal with it. Apparently, from what I could overhear as he called his supervisor over, some of the anti-counterfeit features used in US passports are not used in our passports. The agent asked for another form of ID, which I handed over, and it was scrutinised as well. Eventually, I was let through.

I wasn't fussed as I'm certain that they were wanting to ensure that all was in order. But I stood there for just shy of five minutes when most people would hand over driver's licence and be gone in five seconds.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 03 July 2014, 02:52 PM
Sue's Avatar
Sue Sue is offline
 
Join Date: 26 December 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 9,210
Default

It's not the lack of teapot it's the lack of water brought to a rolling boil that I notice when I ask for tea in the States, and to be fair in many restaurants here in Canada too for that matter. Also here, I think you'd be hardpressed to find a house that doesn't have a kettle but when I've been in the US it doesn't seem nearly as automatic. When I notice someone warm water in a cup in a microwave and then put their tea bag in the cup I can see my grandmother swooning in horror.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:02 PM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

There are plenty of places I can go to where, when I order tea, it comes already brewed, or they give me a teapot, or they give it to me brewed in a teapot. And I do prefer it that way myself. I do not buy tea from someplace like Starbucks, where (last time I checked, anyway) you just get hot water and a selection of tea bags.

It may only be Americans who do this, but it doesn't mean all Americans do this.

I recall reading an interview with Sarah Ferguson talking about tea. She basically said the only way to brew proper tea was with a teapot, and gave a long, complicated list of steps. I tried it. It wasn't better than the way I usually make it (boil water in kettle; pour over tea bag in cup). I only do it that way when I want to be fancy and drink out of my little tea cups, too small to really brew tea in. She made much of Americans screwing up the tea.

In the summer I prefer it brewed very strong and then served over ice, which is a whole different argument to have with horrified British people.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:06 PM
Chloe's Avatar
Chloe Chloe is offline
 
Join Date: 13 September 2004
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 39,316
Default

You can't really complain about stereotypes of Americans serving unbrewed tea bags and hot water when you've personally invoked stereotypes of British people sneering and getting the vapors when tea isn't served to their liking.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:12 PM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

Not complaining. Americans do serve unbrewed tea bags and hot water.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:14 PM
Sue's Avatar
Sue Sue is offline
 
Join Date: 26 December 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 9,210
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post

In the summer I prefer it brewed very strong and then served over ice, which is a whole different argument to have with horrified British people.
This is Starbucks saving grace for me. It's one of the few places I can get iced tea that is unsweetened and not made from those (to me) awful tasting powders.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:24 PM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

I don't like to buy iced tea out in the world very often because it tastes weird. I just had one of those realizations you feel silly about. Of course most places aren't actually brewing the tea.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 03 July 2014, 03:31 PM
GenYus234's Avatar
GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 26,695
Default

Can you get the proper vapours whilst sneering? The facial expression of a good case of the vapours is at odds with the facial expression of a sneer.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 03 July 2014, 04:54 PM
Hero_Mike's Avatar
Hero_Mike Hero_Mike is offline
 
 
Join Date: 06 April 2005
Location: Phoenix, AZ & Hamilton, ON
Posts: 7,267
Canada

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post
Not complaining. Americans do serve unbrewed tea bags and hot water.
As opposed to, say, brewed tea bags? I don't know what you are expecting here? Unless it is a place with a high volume of tea drinkers (like an Asian or Indian restaurant) you won't see pots of tea being brewed all the time, so you can just refill an individual's cup. Tea is best served hot and freshly brewed or steeped, and I think that tea drinkers appreciate getting a fresh and previously unused tea bag, as if the bag is already in the hot water, it's hard to tell.

There are places which serve tea in pots - loose tea or in a tea ball in a large pot of hot water. But those are large pots and typically you need a few people to share it to make it economical.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 03 July 2014, 05:28 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 26,440
Default

There must be some look of horrified disgust that combines the two...
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 03 July 2014, 05:36 PM
Chloe's Avatar
Chloe Chloe is offline
 
Join Date: 13 September 2004
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 39,316
Default

"Oh la! The colonials are being repulsive again!" *fans self*
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 03 July 2014, 06:24 PM
UrbanLegends101 UrbanLegends101 is offline
 
Join Date: 24 November 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,385
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UEL View Post
The only time I had questionable ID issues was flying out of Wichita, Kansas. I was flying from Wichita to get back to New Brunswick. There, the TSA agents had a stand on the way towards security where you had to produce ID. I suppose Wichita does not get many international travellers, so when I produced my passport (the green government issued one), the agent did not know how to deal with it. Apparently, from what I could overhear as he called his supervisor over, some of the anti-counterfeit features used in US passports are not used in our passports. .
UEL, I've had a similar experience with our US passport when being checked by TSA security at Jacksonville, FL.

the TSA agent pulled out the magnifying lens to scrutinize all three of our passports and paid particular attention to mine, looking for something wrong. If I had not already been on his wrong side by presenting all three of us as a traveling family, I'd have asked him what was so difficult with my passport to require such scrutiny and if there was a real problem, as soon as I got back to "home" I'd bounce over to the consular section and get a new passport to replace the "defective" one. All three of our passports were issued sequentially, same date, three numbers in a row.

Interestingly, I've have more scrutiny of my passpost when used as a boarding identification than when I've come back into the US on the very same passport. Perhaps the USCIS gets a verification on their ID system when the machine readable portion of the passport is scanned, perhaps the data from the Passport Agency along with the photo is displayed, so if I had a fake US passport, the data would not match.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 03 July 2014, 06:45 PM
hoitoider's Avatar
hoitoider hoitoider is offline
 
Join Date: 22 October 2001
Location: Beaufort, SC
Posts: 5,999
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post
I don't like to buy iced tea out in the world very often because it tastes weird.
They probably are not moving it quick enough so it's out at room temperature too long, which causes bacteria growth that affects the taste. I notice the taste can get bitter after just an hour or so. If they kept it refrigerated it would last longer.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 03 July 2014, 07:00 PM
UEL's Avatar
UEL UEL is offline
 
Join Date: 01 August 2004
Location: Fredericton, Canada
Posts: 9,384
Baseball

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLegends101 View Post
UEL, I've had a similar experience with our US passport when being checked by TSA security at Jacksonville, FL.

the TSA agent pulled out the magnifying lens to scrutinize all three of our passports and paid particular attention to mine, looking for something wrong. If I had not already been on his wrong side by presenting all three of us as a traveling family, I'd have asked him what was so difficult with my passport to require such scrutiny and if there was a real problem, as soon as I got back to "home" I'd bounce over to the consular section and get a new passport to replace the "defective" one. All three of our passports were issued sequentially, same date, three numbers in a row.
You could very well be right. I don't know. It is a sample size of one and I rarely fly out of the US to go anywhere except Canada, and then the boarding agent is the only one who looks at passports.

No one else flying out that morning was using a passport, and subsequent trips out of there I used my ID cards. I was also thinking that perhaps it was a TSA agent under training which would mean that a bona fide foreign passport might very well be a wonderful opportunity to learn how other countries prevent counterfeiting. Either way, I was not bothered in the least. It was a good passport and I had plenty of time.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 03 July 2014, 08:50 PM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
Join Date: 18 July 2002
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 15,910
Default

I've never had a problem using my passport as ID, but I would speculate that maybe some airports don't see very many international travelers, so when the TSA agent sees a passport instead of a drivers license or ID card it throws them off.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 03 July 2014, 09:18 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 26,440
Default

I got a surprised look when I showed my passport as ID on a local train that happened to cross the border between Germany and the Netherlands. Most people were showing driving licenses or other ID.

They generally don't even check ID for border crossings within Europe (or the free travel bits - Schencken zone?), so it might just have been a random spot-check on this occasion.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 04 July 2014, 03:09 AM
Dasla's Avatar
Dasla Dasla is offline
 
Join Date: 15 April 2010
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,719
Default

Back to the orginal topic, half those things in the list have been said by Australian's about Australia (especially about mmigration). So much for "only in America"
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 04 July 2014, 11:48 AM
Alarm's Avatar
Alarm Alarm is offline
 
Join Date: 26 May 2011
Location: Nepean, ON
Posts: 5,807
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Sue, since your description is exactly what you'd expect in a competitive market, I don't see how it provides any evidence for price fixing.
In a competitive market, People will try to sell their goods lower than their competitor, to get more sales.

In the gas market, all the sellers in the same market suddenly raise or lwoer their prices AT THE SAME TIME, to the same amount, so that people do not have a choice. The only thing that determines where you buy your gas is which loyalty card you have or if you've got coupons.

Don't tell me that's free market... because it's not.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 04 July 2014, 12:23 PM
lord_feldon's Avatar
lord_feldon lord_feldon is offline
 
Join Date: 08 August 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 12,388
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post
In a competitive market, People will try to sell their goods lower than their competitor, to get more sales.
Gas markups are pretty low already. Lower prices mean taking a loss, which would be pretty stupid when the demand for gasoline isn't all that price-sensitive. In the long term, people can change their habits, but nobody is going to decide not to go to work tomorrow because they woke up to find that gas went up 10 cents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post
In the gas market, all the sellers in the same market suddenly raise or lwoer their prices AT THE SAME TIME, to the same amount, so that people do not have a choice.
Information travels quickly in 2014. Why wouldn't the gas stations all be notified at about the same time that the price they're paying for the stuff in their tanks went up?
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 04 July 2014, 01:21 PM
Steve Steve is offline
 
Join Date: 19 October 2002
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 4,906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post
In a competitive market, People will try to sell their goods lower than their competitor, to get more sales.
And then the competitor makes his prices even lower than that, and soon everything is given away for free. Or of course, maybe prices for a commodity reach a fixed level quickly.
Quote:
In the gas market, all the sellers in the same market suddenly raise or lwoer their prices AT THE SAME TIME, to the same amount, so that people do not have a choice. The only thing that determines where you buy your gas is which loyalty card you have or if you've got coupons.

Don't tell me that's free market... because it's not.
I won't tell you that because things like loyalty cards and coupons wouldn't exist in a perfect free market, so those 2 things are bits of evidence that companies have small amounts of monopoly power. But using the price change as evidence of price -fixing makes no sense since companies are just getting the same information on supply and responding to it at the same time.

Do people get this way about commodities like gold, or about foreign currencies as well? Or is it just oil where price changes that aren't at all evidence of price-fixing are used as evidence of price-fixing? (And yes, I read the articles Sue posted and realize that price fixing occurs. "Companies admit to it" is good evidence it occurs. "Companies change prices at the same time" isn't.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
John Wayne on stupidity snopes Questionable Quotes 12 30 June 2010 03:27 PM
Grocery List 1958Fury Glurge Gallery 8 03 August 2007 12:09 AM
The Crusade Against E-mail Stupidity ParaDiddle Inboxer Rebellion 13 14 May 2007 05:00 PM
'Millionaire' stupidity lazerus the duck Fauxtography 22 06 February 2007 12:07 PM
Ignore list snopes Test Issues 6 25 December 2006 04:46 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.