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  #41  
Old 23 October 2018, 11:05 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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Why is it that in England, a Honda is a Honder and a Mazda is a Mazder?
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  #42  
Old 23 October 2018, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
AIUI, the imaginary creature under your bed and/or in your closet* is a bogeyman.
But the UK version of "booger" is bogey, so it still could be the same word.

Chambers Dictionary of Etymology says that bogey as in bogeyman comes from "old Bogey" for the devil, and an older word "bogy" meaning goblin, which is of uncertain origin but might be related to the Scots "bogle" / "bogill" which may in turn be from "bogge" or "bugge" meaning terror / fear - also as in "bugbear", and related to similar Welsh words "bwg", an obsolete word for a ghost or goblin, and "bwgwl", fear.

That doesn't mention bogey as in the thing you find up your nose, but Chambers Dictionary itself lists it ("a piece of dried mucus") as one of the definitions under the same heading.

However, The Cassell Dictionary of Slang agrees with Chambers about the bogeyman / old Bogey / devil / goblin connection, but reckons that bogey as in "piece of dried mucus" might be related to the word "boggy" instead, so it would be a different word. It puts a question mark next to that, though.

Last edited by Richard W; 23 October 2018 at 11:31 PM.
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  #43  
Old 23 October 2018, 11:29 PM
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Why is it that in England, a Honda is a Honder and a Mazda is a Mazder?
Well, many English accents don't actually pronounce that "r", so although I could spell Honda phonetically as "Honder", there's no difference between that and the way I'd say "Honda" anyway, so I can't see why I would do so...

Have you encountered lots of people from the West Country or with other accents with a rhotic "r", talking about "Honderrrrs" and "Mazderrrs"?
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  #44  
Old 24 October 2018, 12:09 AM
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Bogey and boogie are pronounced differently though. I grew up knowing about "the boogie man". When I see the term "bogey man" in print, I mentally pronounce it with the same vowel sound as the word bogus.
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  #45  
Old 24 October 2018, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Chambers Dictionary of Etymology says that bogey as in bogeyman comes from "old Bogey" for the devil, and an older word "bogy" meaning goblin, which is of uncertain origin but might be related to the Scots "bogle" / "bogill" which may in turn be from "bogge" or "bugge" meaning terror / fear - also as in "bugbear", and related to similar Welsh words "bwg", an obsolete word for a ghost or goblin, and "bwgwl", fear.
Bogle is used in the north of England too, along with 'boggle' and 'boggart'. I know of a Boggart Hole Clough in Manchester, a Bogle Crag Wood in the Lake District and a Boggle Hole near Whitby.

I don't know why they seem to like holes so much. Maybe their relative the bogeyman is equally shy and that's why it lives under the bed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
Why is it that in England, a Honda is a Honder and a Mazda is a Mazder?
Not to me it isn't! I'm from Greater Manchester originally, where there's a very specific regional pronunciation for 'a' and 'er' at the ends of words that makes it sound like we're throwing it at you with a grunt. It's sort of a cross between an 'uh' and an 'oh' (with a soft 'o').

Last edited by Blatherskite; 24 October 2018 at 12:30 PM.
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  #46  
Old 24 October 2018, 02:12 PM
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Is this where we can bring up jag-whar vs. jag-yewer and ex-straw-dinarry vs. extra-ordinary?
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  #47  
Old 24 October 2018, 02:17 PM
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I quite like the US pronunciation of "jaguar" - it sounds much more aggressive and almost growly. "I've got a JAGwaaaarrrr". I'd sound silly saying it like that myself, though.

(eta) I don't know anybody who pronounces "extraordinary" as "extra - ordinary" though. Or is that the US pronunciation? I don't remember hearing it said like that at all.
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  #48  
Old 24 October 2018, 02:19 PM
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But I say jag-wire.
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  #49  
Old 24 October 2018, 02:48 PM
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I hear the "R" added to words, mostly proper names, by various racing commentators. One by the name of Lee Diffy is the most memorable. I have no idea exactly where he is from,
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  #50  
Old 24 October 2018, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
Why is it that in England, a Honda is a Honder and a Mazda is a Mazder?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
I hear the "R" added to words, mostly proper names, by various racing commentators.
This is called the intrusive R.

A very clear example is when Paul McCartney sang "Till There Was You" and said there were birds on the hill, but I never sawr them winging...

Seaboe
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  #51  
Old 24 October 2018, 03:29 PM
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I knew someone whose mother was from Boston. She always added an r to the end of my name.
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  #52  
Old 24 October 2018, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
I don't know anybody who pronounces "extraordinary" as "extra - ordinary" though. Or is that the US pronunciation? I don't remember hearing it said like that at all.
I've heard Michael Palin and (I think) David Frost say it that way - at least that's the way it sounds to me. It's 6 syllables vs. the usual 5, although the second and third do slur into each other a bit.

Quote:
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I knew someone whose mother was from Boston. She always added an r to the end of my name.
kitapr?
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  #53  
Old 24 October 2018, 05:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
(eta) I don't know anybody who pronounces "extraordinary" as "extra - ordinary" though. Or is that the US pronunciation? I don't remember hearing it said like that at all.
You'll hear it in the song L-O-V-E by Nat King Cole, but that's more just artistic license to make it fit the meter of the song. I don't think I've heard anyone speak it that way before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
This is called the intrusive R.

A very clear example is when Paul McCartney sang "Till There Was You" and said there were birds on the hill, but I never sawr them winging...

Seaboe
So this is the reason Jeremy Clarkson always pronounces Peugeot as "Purr-gho", I assume? I've actually heard some Americans pronounce it that way now, as they haven't been sold here for over two decades and they're not all that well known of a car brand here, so the only place they ever hear about them are from British Top Gear and now The Grand Tour.

Come to think of it there are some American accents that add extra 'R's to words, most stereotypically being Texans pronouncing "wash" as "warsh".
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  #54  
Old 24 October 2018, 05:39 PM
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How do you pronounce the car brand "Hyundai". In the US, I usually hear it as "Hun-die"* but in Australia it was "H-yun-die". Hyundai themselves aren't much help as they seem to tailor the pronunciation to the region.

* Oddly enough, also a WWI slogan.
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  #55  
Old 24 October 2018, 05:49 PM
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I've heard both Hun-die and Hun-day.
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  #56  
Old 24 October 2018, 06:26 PM
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I knew someone who worked in a U.S. company that did animation for TV commercials, so she heard a lot of stuff being discussed in the ad agencies. She told me there was a new car coming which the company insisted was pronounced ""H'YUN-die". (And she always said it in a deep growling voice.) I guess the company changed it's mind before the U.S. launch.
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  #57  
Old 24 October 2018, 07:50 PM
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I say Hun-day, but I also hear Hun-die locally.

As for Volkswagen, I use farfegnugen as a mild swear word, because I think it makes a good one. Like felgercarb only better known.

Seaboe
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  #58  
Old 24 October 2018, 08:01 PM
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On the subject of pronouncing car brands, although everyone in America pronounces Subaru "SOO-ba-roo" nowadays, apparently that wasn't always the case. In these old ads from when the brand first came to the US it's pronounced "su-BAH-roo". According to one of the commenters that's how the Japanese pronounce it.

https://youtu.be/zLPp-NFInXw
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  #59  
Old 24 October 2018, 08:27 PM
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As heard in the immortal song, "Making Love in a Subaru".
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  #60  
Old 24 October 2018, 08:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
As heard in the immortal song, "Making Love in a Subaru".
That must be where we got the pronunciation!
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