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Old 22 August 2018, 01:17 PM
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Icon22 Online shopping and cheap prices are turning Americans into hoarders

From The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/technolo...f-junk/567985/

I guess it's possible to buy something and then forget g-you bought it; I've never had that happen.
IMO if you don't need the item, it's not a bargain. Plus I have enough stuff as it is.
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Old 22 August 2018, 03:44 PM
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As someone who is personally acquainted with hoarding and the psychological components behind it, buying lots of stuff is not hoarding.

If you can recognize that you'll never use it, you're not a hoarder. There is a huge difference between impulse shopping/amassing stuff, and being unable to throw away literal garbage due to the anxiety and panic attacks that doing so would cause.

I know that's not the focus of the article but I hate it when psychological diagnoses are used casually.
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Old 22 August 2018, 04:04 PM
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The critieria in DSM-V does not seem to require that the items be literal garbage for a diagnosis of hoarding disorder. It does say that the accumulation creates an unsafe environment but that can be from multiple causes, not just spoiled food or such. It also says that the accumulation does not take into account the actual value of the items, but unrealistic value does not mean the items are garbage.

As with most diagnosis (AIUI) the issue is how the accumulation affects the person, not what is being accumulated. If g-you have so many Faberge eggs that it adversely affects g-your well-being and social life, g-you could be a hoarder.

ETA: It doesn't sound like anyone described in the article has reached a clinical definition of hoarding disorder however so I agree with that part of your issue with the article.
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Old 22 August 2018, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
A

I know that's not the focus of the article but I hate it when psychological diagnoses are used casually.
You and me both.
I was rolling my eyes while I read the article.
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Old 22 August 2018, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
The critieria in DSM-V does not seem to require that the items be literal garbage for a diagnosis of hoarding disorder.
I was using garbage as an extreme example.
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Old 26 August 2018, 06:35 PM
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Quote:
In 2015, the most recent year for which data is available, Americans put 16 million tons of textiles in the municipal waste stream, a 68 percent increase from 2000. We tossed 34.5 million tons of plastics, a 35 percent increase from 2000, according to data from the Environmental Protection Agency. Over that same time period, the population grew just 14 percent.
The article discusses a very real problem, but this thread debates semantics. Nice to see that even though the board isn't what it once was some things never change .
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Old 26 August 2018, 11:32 PM
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Neener, Neener

We're debating terminolgy, not semantics.
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Old 26 August 2018, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
We're debating terminolgy, not semantics.
and extra words....
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Old 27 August 2018, 12:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
The article discusses a very real problem, but this thread debates semantics. Nice to see that even though the board isn't what it once was some things never change .
The article though is a bit scattered. Is the problem buying too much stuff or hoarding? The solution to one of the problems is not necessarily the solution to the other.

...and the editor that wrote the article headline was getting a little click-batey.
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Old 28 August 2018, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
As someone who is personally acquainted with hoarding and the psychological components behind it, buying lots of stuff is not hoarding.
It's a bit tricky with the word 'hoarding' because to hoard is literally just to accumulate lots of stuff. It was a general description before it was a psychological one.

However, I would normally only expect the word 'hoarder' to refer to people with a psychological compulsion to hoard. So I could say I hoard books, but I am not a hoarder. It's like the difference between being depressed about something but not being depressive.

It's funny (but not in a ha ha way) that the word 'hoarder' should be misused because I think the psychological term that gets thrown about the most haphazardly is 'OCD' (as in 'I'm so OCD about keeping my house at a basic standard of cleanliness!') and hoarding is quite closely related to OCD.
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Old 28 August 2018, 03:10 PM
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If the problem is not just buying lots of stuff, but buying stuff and then throwing it away, that isn't hoarding in any sense of the term, since it's not being accumulated.

I just brought a bunch of fabric back to give away, because otherwise it would've been thrown away--mostly because there was no convenient thrift store to donate it to. Where I am, I can give away the fabric on her behalf and anything not claimed by my friends can be donated to charity.

Seaboe
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Old 28 August 2018, 05:16 PM
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Proper diagnosis is a perfectly legitimate test for insurance or disability, but it doesn't separate people who are true hoarders from those who misuse the term. A diagnosis is simply putting an 'official' label on something that already existed.
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