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Old 09 November 2013, 09:45 PM
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Chicken Butterball turkeys are halal?

Comment: Are Butterball turkeys halal meat?
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  #2  
Old 09 November 2013, 10:10 PM
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After all the backlash last Thanksgiving from Pamela Geller and her minions, it seems that Butterball has pulled the plug on American-Muslim consumers and is no longer selling halal turkeys. Here’s a conversation I recently had with Butterball’s customer support.
http://www.sameerseats.com/butterbal...-longer-halal/

ETA: There was a thread about this 2 years ago...
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Old 24 January 2015, 10:12 PM
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Halal has to do with the way you slit an animals throat while chanting a prayer? Obviously I'm not Muslim but that's my understanding. We did grow up on a farm and when you killed a chicken to eat you strangled it. So just going by that completely unscientific assessment I'd say turkeys are killed the same way so no they wouldn't use the halal method.
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Old 26 January 2015, 05:25 PM
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Just get a Kosher turkey.
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Old 26 January 2015, 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by urbanlegendfanatic View Post
We did grow up on a farm and when you killed a chicken to eat you strangled it. So just going by that completely unscientific assessment I'd say turkeys are killed the same way so no they wouldn't use the halal method.
I'm guessing that industrial turkey farms would find manual strangulation rather too labor-intensive for their purposes.
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Old 26 January 2015, 06:30 PM
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Small-scale chicken processing facilities around here put the chicken in a cone and cut the head off. They don't strangle it.

As far as individual farmers on particular farms: IME, if there is more than one possible way to do something, and there is more than one farmer, then more than one technique will be in use.
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Old 26 January 2015, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by snopes View Post
I'm guessing that industrial turkey farms would find manual strangulation rather too labor-intensive for their purposes.
Just hire Artie. He does them for just over $0.33 each.
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Old 26 January 2015, 08:32 PM
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GenYus234:



That's an old one;

Artie chokes 3 for a dollar

BW
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Old 27 January 2015, 12:11 AM
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I realize that this is ancient, but the information provided by Butterball in the above links only state that their turkeys are not "certified" as halal. Halal slaughter is less complicated than kosher slaughter, but generally does involve throat-slitting and draining the blood. However, even if the turkeys are killed that way, there must be oversight by a halal authority to ensure that the animals don't suffer, that nothing disgusting is nearby (such as, no ham products involved in the packaging; if pigs are slaughtered at same facility, that equipment is cleaned thoroughly, etc). I don't know all the rules, and there is no central authority in Islam, but generally Muslims who follow the dietary laws are content to have an authority certify.

Butterball turkeys would obviously not be kosher, because they use butter (hence mix milk and meat.)

Anyhow, I think this is a case of the company not wanting to pay the fees for a halal authority to certify.
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Old 27 January 2015, 11:19 AM
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My culinary experts tell me that Butterball turkeys are available in The Sultan Center, in Salmiya, Kuwait City, maybe seasonal, maybe not.

Don't know if only non-Muslims buy them.
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Old 19 March 2015, 10:44 PM
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A little OT but most of the lamb you buy from New Zealand is slaughtered according to Halal requirements. So if you're a person who is objecting to it for humanitarian reasons you might want to skip the New Zealand label and buy your Easter lamb imported from elsewhere Here's what the Beef and Lamb of New Zealand website says about it;


FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions

Is the beef available in New Zealand supermarkets all Halal?

Although a significant proportion of sheep and beef is slaughtered according to halal requirements, only a much smaller percentage is actually halal-certified and labeled. Halal audit, certification and labeling incur extra costs, so it is only done at the request of a customer or when it is a market access requirement overseas.
In the case of New Zealand supermarkets, the beef and lamb may be from animals that have been slaughtered in accordance with halal requirements - but that product is subsequently ‘contaminated’ by the addition of non-halal ingredients or proximity to non-halal goods such as pork. It therefore becomes re-designated as non-halal and cannot be labelled as halal in supermarkets.
What monies are paid to the Islamic Federation of New Zealand?

Halal accredited meat processors do pay fees to halal certification agencies. These fees are paid to certifiers for periodic audits of processing premises and also for provision of halal certificates (for Muslim overseas markets and specific Halal shops in New Zealand). Halal accredited processing plants produce halal meat primarily for the purposes of export to Muslim markets. The costs of maintaining halal accreditation would need to be recovered from those targeted export markets. Accredited plants compete on the New Zealand market with non-accredited processors, so there is no opportunity for accredited processors to pass on halal-related costs to New Zealand consumers who are not purchasing halal-certified product.
Is the Halal method of slaughtering animals in full compliance with animal welfare requirements in New Zealand?

In New Zealand, all commercial slaughter of livestock, including religious slaughter, must be undertaken in a humane manner in accordance with New Zealand’s animal welfare laws. These laws require animals to be ‘stunned’ immediately prior to slaughter. Stunning ensures an immediate loss of consciousness to prevent animals from feeling any pain during the slaughter process.
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Old 20 March 2015, 07:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samwise Z View Post
Butterball turkeys would obviously not be kosher, because they use butter (hence mix milk and meat.)
Just because the name contains the word butter doesn't mean they have butter in them. Anyway, they don't.
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Old 17 April 2015, 01:39 AM
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And I also think that only Jews follow that milk/meat thing, and only when the meat is beef. So butter and turkey would be fine together.
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Old 17 April 2015, 02:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Furienna View Post
And I also think that only Jews follow that milk/meat thing, and only when the meat is beef. So butter and turkey would be fine together.
I don't know whether there's a meat/milk prohibition in halal, or if so what the rules are; but for kosher it doesn't apply only to beef. It applies to any mammal meat and also to poultry. Fish is generally considered OK with either meat or milk, though [ETA there are differences of opinion about whether fish is OK with meat.].

Last edited by thorny locust; 17 April 2015 at 02:30 AM.
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Old 17 April 2015, 03:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Furienna View Post
And I also think that only Jews follow that milk/meat thing, and only when the meat is beef. So butter and turkey would be fine together.
Lamb and milk are not allowed.

Just a data point.
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Old 17 April 2015, 11:21 AM
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Okay, my bad. You're so right that that rule would also apply to meat from other mammals. I don't see why it would apply to poultry or fish though, as you can't get milk from them.
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Old 17 April 2015, 02:00 PM
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Getting back to halal, one thing I like about my part of this city (significant Muslim population here) is that halal meats in the supermarket are typically cheaper than their regular meats.

We don't eat a lot of meat at home, but when we go shopping, it is nice to know that there are inexpensive options that are just as good**.

I suspect that it is because many non-Muslim people won't buy halal meats out of fear of the unknown.

**Maple Leaf, a meat producing company, puts out regular and halal lines of products. I can't see the difference. But the pricing is different.
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Old 17 April 2015, 02:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Furienna View Post
Okay, my bad. You're so right that that rule would also apply to meat from other mammals. I don't see why it would apply to poultry or fish though, as you can't get milk from them.
The website Jewish Values offers two Orthodox explanations and one Reform explanation, all by rabbis. Here's an excerpt from the Orthodox explanation by Rabbi Leonard Levy (Emeritus):

Quote:
To sum it all up: Since people thought of fowl as meat, the Rabbis were concerned that if people were permitted to eat fowl and milk together, they would conclude that other types of meat must also be permitted with milk. They thus decreed that everything which people think of as meat should be prohibited to eat with milk, and decreed that fowl and kosher wild animals, which were not prohibited by Torah law, would henceforth by prohibited by Rabbinic law.
ETA: None of those rabbis think it applies to fish, FWIW.
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Old 17 April 2015, 03:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Furienna View Post
I don't see why it would apply to poultry or fish though, as you can't get milk from them.
Well, the original language only prohibits a specific recipe.

It's a matter of "building a fence around the law". In order not to violate the law by accident, and in order not to violate the sense of the law even if obeying the literal language, it also becomes forbidden to do anything that's considered overly similar to the original prohibition.

Exactly what seems overly similar can be a matter of debate. But for a very long time the consensus seems to have been that poultry is generally considered meat; but that fish is not. So it's OK to have lox and cream cheese together on a bagel; but cream of chicken soup is out.

Humans -- not only Jewish humans -- spend a lot of time trying to find places to draw nice neat lines between categories of things that do not have nice neat lines between them except in human heads. Because the lines aren't real, we disagree as to where they ought to go, and one group's decisions often look silly to members of other groups.

However, the fact that we do this does have a real-world basis: in order to get through our daily lives without spending every minute of our time deciding what category to temporarily stick something in for purposes of dealing with one specific example on this particular Tuesday, it's often highly functional to do more general categorization. Alhough, on some specific Tuesdays, it may run us into trouble, the overall categorization tendency may have kept us alive long enought to get to that Tuesday in the first place.
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