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  #1  
Old 06 August 2008, 01:33 AM
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snopes snopes is offline
 
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Icon81 Fainting prevention

Comment: In a United States convention of neurologists from all over the
world, one of the main topics was the phenomenon of people fainting upon
getting up from bed.

One of the speakers was Professor Linda McMaron of Great Britain and she
gave a lengthy speech regarding her study on this issue. She elaborated
that after many years of study and investigation on this subject, she came
to the conclusion that the fainting is caused by the sharp transfer
between laying down and standing up.

Professor McMaron said that it takes 12 seconds for the blood to flow from
the feet to the brain. But when a person quickly stands up upon waking up,
the blood gets 'thrown' to the brain too quickly and the result is
fainting. She suggested that each person, even one that does not have a
tendency to faint, upon waking up should sit on the bed, and count slowly
till 12 to avoid dizziness, weakness, and/or fainting.

Her speech was rewarded with loud applause and enthusiastic feedbacks.

Another Professor, a Jewish religious man, asked permission to speak.

He said: "By us, the Jews, there is an old tradition, thousands of years
old, to say a prayer of thanks to the Creator of the World for meriting us
to wake up healthy and whole. The prayer is said immediately upon waking
up, while one is still on the bed and sitting down. There are 12 words in
this prayer and if one regulates himself to say it slowly with
concentration, it takes exactly 12 seconds to says it... 12 words in 12
seconds.

He said the prayer slowly in Hebrew:

Mode Ani Lefanecha Melech Chai VeKayam, Shehechezarta Bi Nishmati Bechemla Raba Emunatecha

"I thank Thee, O living and eternal King, because Thou hast graciously
restored my soul to me; great is Thy faithfulness."

The auditorium burst into a standing applause that roared throughout the
auditorium. This time, it was for the Creator of the World.
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  #2  
Old 06 August 2008, 06:49 AM
BamaRainbow BamaRainbow is offline
 
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Well, of course. Don't we all spend just as much time uttering the word "shehechezarta" as we do the word "bi"?
I actually tried saying the prayer aloud and timed it. In a fairly normal speaking tone, I needed just under 10 seconds. Speaking a bit slower, but still in a rather moderate cadence, it took just under 11 seconds. Trying for the v--e--r--y s--l--o--w, 1-second per word cadence, I ended up with 14 1/2 seconds (the first couple of words aren't too problematic, but once I got to "lefanecha", I got "behind schedule", and couldn't get back on track, especially with "shehechezarta" and "emunatecha").
For this "prayer" to take EXACTLY 12 seconds needs a hell of a lot more practice than anyone really needs. (The closest I got to "exactly 12 seconds" was 11.96 seconds.)
One other little problem I have with this is just how really serious and widespread this "phenomenon" of fainting actually is. Did these presumably "serious" scientists factor in age and other conditions (such as illness or stress) in this "phenomenon"? I know I used to have NO problem jumping up right out of bed when I was younger, but I do have an overall more difficult time getting out of bed. I frequently feel a bit disoriented (especially if I've just woke up in the middle of a dream) but I've never felt like I was going to faint. Wouldn't an equally likely answer to the fainting problem be from a sudden change in fluid levels in the inner ear?
(After doing a bit more reading of this glurge, it dawns on me that Prof McMaron might be a bit screwy anyway. How exactly does the blood flow "too quickly" from the feet to the head when one STANDS UP? Sounds to me like it's just the opposite--the blood's rushing FROM the head too quickly. Oh well.)
Isn't it also interesting that the first Professor is actually given a NAME and specific nationality while the second Professor is completely unknown aside from being a "Jewish religious man"? One might further note the apparent sexist attitude implied--a "Jewish religious man" (and unnamed, at that) offers an "insight" that is received more raucously than the "mere" woman (but named) professor received.
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  #3  
Old 06 August 2008, 06:57 AM
Gadon
 
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I find it laughable that either speech referred to here would be given "loud applause".

Gadon,
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  #4  
Old 06 August 2008, 07:13 AM
Salamander Salamander is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gadon View Post
I find it laughable that either speech referred to here would be given "loud applause".

Gadon,
I'd imagine the more realistic scenario is that there was a smattering of confused-but-polite applause for the first speaker, since I'd imagine that the neurologists in the audience would be confused as to why this topic was even on the cards... although we can't always attribute the cause of fainting to a particular source, we know plenty about the act itself and how to avoid it.

The second speaker? I'd imagine not a lot more than embarrassed silence was waiting for him.

I'd get stuck into this more but it's glurge and is therefore written by people who really do fail to have any grasp on reality.
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  #5  
Old 06 August 2008, 07:46 AM
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Cyrano Cyrano is offline
 
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BTW, slowly saying:

Hoooooly shit! Not another lousy working day at the NFBSKing office! I reeaaaaly need a coffee NOW.

Also takes 12 seconds.

On weekends, no one needs to jump out of bed anyway.
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  #6  
Old 06 August 2008, 01:44 PM
SLEJDAD
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BamaRainbow View Post
One other little problem I have with this is just how really serious and widespread this "phenomenon" of fainting actually is. Did these presumably "serious" scientists factor in age and other conditions (such as illness or stress) in this "phenomenon"?
I have a friend who is in his late 20's and in excellent physical condition. He actually had this happen, and went to the medical officer (we are military) with understandable concern. The doc wasn't concerned in the least, and explained that it was fairly common, and caused by the blood rushing away from the brain. Doc just advised him to get up me slowly.
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Old 07 August 2008, 03:11 PM
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Skeptic Skeptic is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLEJDAD View Post
I have a friend who is in his late 20's and in excellent physical condition. He actually had this happen, and went to the medical officer (we are military) with understandable concern. The doc wasn't concerned in the least, and explained that it was fairly common, and caused by the blood rushing away from the brain. Doc just advised him to get up me slowly.
The military is one of the only places that I can think of where getting up in a hurry is important.
Guys, we're under enemy attack. Quickly Seargent, count to 12 so the men may get up without danger.
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  #8  
Old 09 August 2008, 05:54 PM
46liter
 
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Default fainting

I find it hard to believe that several years of study would need to be dedicated to this problem. IMHO, if you feel woozy/faint when getting out of bed, you would just get up a liittttle more slowly. I believe a GP would tell a person this if the problem were addressed in the GP's office. These glurges are just about always goofy & irritating, but they do make me feel like I posess a superior intellect to that of the author's. In that respect, the glurges provide a useful service.
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  #9  
Old 27 September 2008, 03:39 AM
joshxrt22
 
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Default lol

Technically it has to do with your blood pressure.

It's called Orthostatic hypotension
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthostatic_hypotension

Saying a prayer has exactly nothing to do with avoiding it, it's just wait for the blood to even out.
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