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  #1  
Old 04 May 2016, 12:06 PM
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DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
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Teacher Cooking questions

I figured that SCQ deserve their own thread in this folder. My SCQ: Why do some recipes--such as chicken marsala--require the meat/poultry to be flattened?
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  #2  
Old 04 May 2016, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I figured that SCQ deserve their own thread in this folder. My SCQ: Why do some recipes--such as chicken marsala--require the meat/poultry to be flattened?
It cooks faster and more evenly when flattened, and pounding ordeals down the muscles to make it more tender.
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  #3  
Old 31 May 2016, 11:59 AM
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So I bought some smoked chicken for a recipe I thought sounded ok. I turned out I didn't much like the recipe in question. Which leaves me with some left over smoked chicken I have no idea what to do with. I am on a budget I don't like to chuck out usable food but I am trying to clean out the freezer as I want to make my pea and ham soup this week.

So does anyone have any recipes they can suggest. If nothing else comes up I was thinking sandwiches with mayo and celery.
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Old 31 May 2016, 12:07 PM
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My mother had a recipe for a hot chicken salad that featured the ingredients you listed plus a topping of dry Chinese noodles whose name I cannot remember right now. I'm sure the interwebs has some recipes.
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Old 31 May 2016, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
My mother had a recipe for a hot chicken salad that featured the ingredients you listed plus a topping of dry Chinese noodles whose name I cannot remember right now. I'm sure the interwebs has some recipes.
That sounds yummy DawnStorm. I will give it a search.
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Old 31 May 2016, 03:07 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Another option if none other come along: Although I do not eat ham, it seems that smoked chicken could go into the pea soup as well.
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Old 01 June 2016, 09:38 PM
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Another stupid question about cooking - if an American recipe calls for heavy cream does that mean whipping cream in Canada?
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  #8  
Old 01 June 2016, 09:49 PM
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Heavy cream = heavy whipping cream, so yes. There is also light whipping cream, which has slightly less fat in it. But you'll be fine using anything called whipping cream.
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Old 02 June 2016, 01:04 PM
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Cream: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sauce...efinitions.htm

As far as smoked chicken... I love smoked chicken! I cube it up in salads, I make hot-chicken sandwiches, or cold toast sandwiches, you could also make southwestern chicken soup with it... possibilities are endless.

OY
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Old 08 June 2016, 08:37 AM
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This should proberly go in "Little Things That Make You Happy" but since I have talked about it here I thought I would put it here.

I have emptied out my freezer enough to make the "Pea and Ham". I am putting it in the slow cooker tommorrow.
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  #11  
Old 08 June 2016, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
This should proberly go in "Little Things That Make You Happy" but since I have talked about it here I thought I would put it here.

I have emptied out my freezer enough to make the "Pea and Ham". I am putting it in the slow cooker tommorrow.
If you ever want to try French-Canadian pea soup (it uses yellow peas, not green peas - the yellow ones are milder), have a look at this recipe: https://www.ricardocuisine.com/en/re...ioned-pea-soup

I could never find yellow peas in Columbia SC until I went to the local Indian grocery store.

OY
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Old 08 June 2016, 02:05 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Glasses

Yellow pea soup is not unique to French-Canadians. It's the only kind my first-generation American mother ever made (her parents immigrated from Sweden). I only eat yellow pea soup.

There's a grocery store supplier here in the northwest (called, appropriately enough Western Family) that packages yellow peas, so I can get them at a regular grocery store.

I don't really use a recipe, however, because this is a soup I've been making all of my adult life, based on my mother's not-quite-a-recipe. I make mine in a crockpot and put it through a food-mill to smoosh the peas. My sister makes it in a regular pot and uses a blender to smoosh the peas. She also puts in more onion than I do, as well as bay leaf. I add a carrot for color as well.

All in all, pea soup is one of the delights of cold weather. It's also probably the healthiest thing I cook.

Seaboe
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Old 08 June 2016, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Yellow pea soup is not unique to French-Canadians. It's the only kind my first-generation American mother ever made (her parents immigrated from Sweden). I only eat yellow pea soup.
Seaboe
True that. I wasn't aware of that until the Interweb.

OY
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Old 09 June 2016, 07:09 AM
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My Pea and Ham recipe says to use "Green or yellow peas, which ever you prefer" I am not sure if yellow peas are available as I have always used green. I bought a packet of spilt peas but had enough left over from last year. So what to do with the extra packet. I could use them in another recipe, make another batch of pea and ham or keep them for next year.


This is a reminder that I made a recipe that used "French style green lentils". I couldn't find them so I use red even though the french style ones are meant to be superior.* Yesterday I found the french ones. But need to remember where I found them.



and also I had some red one I needed to use.
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Old 09 June 2016, 02:07 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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How many peas in a packet? I usually use 2 lbs to make my soup.

Seaboe
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  #16  
Old 11 June 2016, 07:23 PM
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I'm thinking of getting a crock pot/slow cooker. Many of the DASH diet recipes call for one and I like the idea of putting food in the cooker first thing in the morning and then having it ready when I get home from work. Anything special I should look for? (such as size; shape; settings)
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Old 11 June 2016, 07:43 PM
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I think you'll likely have the most versatility with an oval. The size really depends on how much you'll put in it. You can't have good results in a slow cooker that's too big for what you're cooking in it.
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Old 12 June 2016, 03:09 AM
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I just bought an oval slow cooker to replace my round one. I want the ability to cook longer solid things, like ribs, and a round pot doesn't allow that without lopping bits off.
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  #19  
Old 12 June 2016, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
How many peas in a packet? I usually use 2 lbs to make my soup.

Seaboe
500g which is about 18 ounces*.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I'm thinking of getting a crock pot/slow cooker. Many of the DASH diet recipes call for one and I like the idea of putting food in the cooker first thing in the morning and then having it ready when I get home from work. Anything special I should look for? (such as size; shape; settings)
I think my Mum's first slow cooker was round but I never really used it so I can't comment on the difference. Her current one and my one is oval. My is 5.5litres which is just over 9 pints*. Trueth be told for one person the smaller one would most likely be more usefull as it needs to be half full to work and that makes a lot of food of one middle aged woman. But it had another feature on it that the smaller one didn't. Auto cook. To cook food safely you have to have it on high for a while before switching to low. Which if you are having it on all day is what you would want to have it on. Auto does this automatically.

*According to the conversion tables I used. Dear me was that difficult. All the convesions I found online for converting metric to imperial and visa versa both on-line and in my old science text books didn't do litres into pints/gallons or I couldn't get it to work. I finally found it an cook book.

Last edited by Dasla; 12 June 2016 at 08:28 AM. Reason: 9 pints, it's 9 pints
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  #20  
Old 12 June 2016, 07:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post

*According to the conversion tables I used. Dear me was that difficult. All the convesions I found online for converting metric to imperial and visa versa both on-line and in my old science text books didn't do litres into pints/gallons or I couldn't get it to work. I finally found it an cook book.
The windows calculator does conversions to from liters to pints. 5.5 liters is 11.6 pints.

You can also type "convert 5.5 liters to pints" in Google and it will give you the answer.

Though we'd convert that to gallons not pints. So 5.5 liters is 1.45 gallons.
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