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  #321  
Old 27 November 2016, 12:49 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
The lady that taught my word perfect was a former secretary who became a business studies and typing teacher at school (if memory serves) she was in her 50's I am guessing and since this was the early '90's I would say she started her career on manual typewriters before switching to electronic typewriters and then to word processors. I remember her talking about the problems with RSI when electronic typewriters first came in. After showing us a feature you could do on word perfect she would say "That's why they call it Word Perfect!" She obviously had seen a few changes in her career and really liked this one.

While we are on the topic, my Mum has decide to teach my Dad to type.
Just wanted to add that I am sure I wrote "Lexitron" but my phone autocorrected it to "Lexington."
  #322  
Old 27 November 2016, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Crius of CoH View Post
Keyboard shortcuts are usually still faster than using the mouse... assuming one has facility with the keyboard and the willingness to learn 'em.
I did a series of AutoCAD courses when I was heavily into gaming. At the time, I was doing a lot of high end raiding in WoW, which involved really quick mousing, keyboard shortcuts and setting up custom UIs. A lot of the students in the CAD classes (including me) had some sort of drafting background, but some of them struggled with learning how to use the program efficiently. At the time, my brain was already primed to use a combo of mouse and keyboard commands interchangeably, and the giant customizeable workspace just made me happy. I'd always struggled with hand drafting because of a bad hand injury when I was a kid, so it was like turning technical drawings into a game for me. I loved it.
  #323  
Old 28 November 2016, 10:36 AM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Mr. Billion View Post
Is there any important or possibly-important distinction between logging out of a Web site and simply deleting your browser's cookies from that Web site?
It won't matter for most sites, but the server may still have you as logged in on their end.
  #324  
Old 28 November 2016, 02:49 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
I've noticed the same thing. And the ETA and color will update automatically to yellow or red. It seems like this is warning that the ETA just got longer, but I'm not sure what specifically triggers the color change.
On the Washington DOT website, the color of the ETA message is color coded according to whether the current ETA is longer (red), the same (black) or shorter (green) than the average ETA at that time of day.

As an example, during the middle of the day, the ETA for going from Bellevue to Seattle via I-405 and SR 520 is 16 minutes. If it was taking 18, then the website would show that ETA in red, and the map would almost certainly show yellow and red patches on the roads (it's never going to be lower than 16, since that's how long it takes at the legal speed limit).

At 4 pm, the ETA is about 22 minutes. If it were 17 instead, that would be in green type. If it were 44 (not unheard of, sadly), it would be red.

Seaboe
  #325  
Old 29 November 2016, 12:27 AM
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I'm watching a Rifftrax movie on Hulu (Nightmare at Noon), and while the film has uncensored language, the Riffers saying the same words are beeped.

So... What's the point of that? A movie character says the f-word but Bill Corbett saying a few minutes later is beeped out?
  #326  
Old 29 November 2016, 12:41 AM
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Could it be that the bleeps themselves are for comic effect? When Arrested Development was released on Netflix some people complained that they hadn't released the "uncensored" version, but it was explained that there is no uncensored version. The joke in the episode in question gets its humor from the fact the audience doesn't know what Buster is saying. The bleep is so long he surely must be spouting a long string of profanity, something really dirty based on the other characters' reactions, but the viewer is left to fill in the blank as to just what he said that's so filthy.
  #327  
Old 29 November 2016, 12:52 AM
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I think it's a bit like showing a nude in art gallery scene. That doesn't mean other nudity in the scene won't be censored. There's a legitimate reason for the nude art to be shown but it doesn't require getting nude to talk about it. (Silly and irrational, yes, but having a set of vulgar words and body parts generally is.)
  #328  
Old 29 November 2016, 01:36 AM
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I've seen stuff here and there about a product called dryer sheep. What is this product supposed to do and does it actually do what it's supposed to do or is it a bunch of woo?
  #329  
Old 29 November 2016, 02:46 AM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
I've seen stuff here and there about a product called dryer sheep. What is this product supposed to do and does it actually do what it's supposed to do or is it a bunch of woo?
Looks like a fancy version of using a tennis ball in the dryer to fluff up things like pillows and quilts.
  #330  
Old 30 November 2016, 06:13 AM
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Don Enrico Don Enrico is offline
 
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German has not more than a dozen collective nouns for groups of animals. All domestic animals - horses, cattle, sheep - are a "Herde". Thats also true for wild horses and such. Groups of birds and groups of fish, as well as bees and other swarming insects, are a "Schwarm". Whales and dolphins are a "Schule". Wolfs, dogs and other canines are a "Rudel". Ants live in a "Staat". There are a very few special nouns for animals under certain conditions, like "Gespann" for horses or oxen going in harness. All other animals would be called just a "Gruppe".

English, on the other hand, has a wikipedia page on terms of venery. Why is that? I'm not aware of any other language doing that. Most of the English nouns for animals are Anglo-Saxon, as are a lot of the collective nouns. Where they used the same way in Anglo-Saxon times, and if so, when and why did the German language lose this use? Or has the use been added to the English language after it seperated from the other West-Germanic languages? If so, when and why?

Are there any linguists here? I should think so!
  #331  
Old 30 November 2016, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Don Enrico View Post
English, on the other hand, has a wikipedia page on terms of venery. Why is that?
It is strange. Like that part of the vocabulary was developed by poets. And most modern speakers could only correctly use a small fraction of those in a sentence if the situation ever arose.

At least some of them must have been coined in the Modern English era, since they have species from all over the Southern Hemisphere that a typical Middle English speaker would not have encountered groups of. I looked up "pod" for dolphins, and it says the etymology is from the mid 19th century US.

I wonder if that naming convention was more manageable in the past, when there were fewer options for travel and communication, since people would primarily use the terms for the smaller number of species that they regularly dealt with in their local area. And they would have more regular interaction with animals. Today it's mostly just trivia for people outside of a small number of industries still dealing with animals.
  #332  
Old 30 November 2016, 12:22 PM
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Some are definitly modern for the reasons you state, but even in the middle ages, English speakers knew bullfinches, chickens, cormorants, crows, doves and ducks (to pick a few at random). Why did they (or later English speakers) feel the need to group these different kinds of birds into bellowings, clutches, gulps, murders, flights and plumps (or rafts, when on water)?
  #333  
Old 30 November 2016, 12:51 PM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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I think it's just a silly pastime invented by medieval hunters. As per a page linked from Errata's link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terms_of_venery
Quote:
The tradition of using "terms of venery" or "nouns of assembly," collective nouns that are specific to certain kinds of animals," stems from an English hunting tradition of the Late Middle Ages. The fashion of a consciously developed hunting language came to England from France. It is marked by an extensive proliferation of specialist vocabulary, applying different names to the same feature in different animals.
Just a bunch of fact-inventing John Hodgemans of the 14th century playing a language game and it caught on.

Japanese has many counting words for different types of animals, plus every other kind of noun, and the rules are so complex that it's almost as good to simply remember them for each specific type and forget about the rules.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_counter_word
So a theory could be that in ancient times people wanted a way to tell if people were clever or good with words, for example to know how much contact they might have had with other actual facts but without actually quizzing them on real facts. What do you know about crows? They're murder. You're hired. That kind of thing.
  #334  
Old 30 November 2016, 02:20 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Errata View Post
Like that part of the vocabulary was developed by poets.
It may have been started by hunters, but I think it persists for the reason Errata noted: its poetry.

I have a book called An Exaltation of Larks which is a compilation of all the terms the author could find. It is not a thin book.

Seaboe
  #335  
Old 30 November 2016, 09:37 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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It does seem that their widespread occurrence in English has to do with poetry and flowery writing. Many of the words have a distinct connotation relevant to the species, a "murder" of crows but a "charm" of finches. "Stand" or "flamboyance" for flamingos. "Parlament" of owls, "convocation" of eagles, ... definitely some anthropomorphism mixed with the perceived characteristics of the species going on in many of the words.
  #336  
Old 30 November 2016, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Could it be that the bleeps themselves are for comic effect?
I don't think so... IIRC, the situation was a character in the movie says a line with an uncensored f-bomb, then Bill Corbett repeated the line and expanded on it to make a joke. When he said the line it was censored. Weird.

The only reason for this I can think of is that RiffTrax were originally produced as downloads that you'd sync up to a DVD on your own. Instead of producing both a censored and uncensored version for a given movie, they just made one censored version for downloads just in case.
  #337  
Old 01 December 2016, 11:36 AM
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It also may serve so that they can say that the trax themselves as family-friendly no matter the situation. Having curse works means that their product can be indexed as explicit which can affect their income source.

It['s just easier to do it censored all the time vs having to do 2 different versions. That could be their preference froma style perspecitive
  #338  
Old 03 December 2016, 08:24 PM
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Question related to my posts about the low tire pressure warning light in the LTTAM thread: Is that light meant as a warning that one of the tires is flat, or a reminder to keep them properly inflated? Or both? Because the first time I saw that light come on I really did have a flat tire. Subsequent times it's come on none of the tires were flat, but I inflated them all and that seemed to make the light go out, except for last time when it stayed on for a day and then went out. Each of those times the tires were maybe a few psi below where they should be, but not significantly low. Is that a sign of a malfunctioning sensor, or is it its job to remind me to inflate the tires when there a few psi low?
  #339  
Old 03 December 2016, 08:50 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Few psi low.
  #340  
Old 03 December 2016, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Question related to my posts about the low tire pressure warning light in the LTTAM thread: Is that light meant as a warning that one of the tires is flat, or a reminder to keep them properly inflated?
Each valve stem has a TMPS device, which is typically a digital pressure sensor, a transmitter similar to your keyless entry fob, and a battery. Every second or so it will power itself on for a few milliseconds, get a pressure measurement, broadcast that measurement along with an ID unique to that TMPS device, and then turn off again.

One of the computers that runs your car is the Body Control Module (BCM) which handles tasks like keyless entry, operation of locks and windows, interior lights, climate control, etc. It can receive the data bursts from the TMPS devices, which have a range of a few feet, but unless the system goes through the initialization process, the BCM doesn't know what TMPS devices are on its own wheels. (You wouldn't want your TMPS to alert you that the guy next to you in traffic has low pressure.) The initialization process can vary; for mine I need to put the TMPS in reprogram mode and then activate each transmitter in sequence with a magnetic trigger, which the TMPS then assigns to each of the 4 wheel positions. Usually this isn't necessary for older vehicles that don't know or care where each wheel is, only that it can detect 4 of them.

Regardless of how it's initialized, the operation is the same. The BCM uses the keyless entry receiver to also gather tire pressure and transmits that to whatever module handles the instrument panel functions. That module then determines if it's receiving all 4 tires, and if the pressures are within spec (government regulation requires a warning at 75% of rated pressure) and reports the data on the instrument console. I'm not sure if the rating is transmitted by the sensor or recorded somewhere in the car's computers, and I don't know if there's some upper limit as well.

Quote:
Because the first time I saw that light come on I really did have a flat tire. Subsequent times it's come on none of the tires were flat, but I inflated them all and that seemed to make the light go out,
When the tires were just a bit low, do you remember the pressure of the least-inflated tire? I'll bet it was <75% of spec.

Quote:
except for last time when it stayed on for a day and then went out.
That would be a malfunction of some sort.

Quote:
is it its job to remind me to inflate the tires when there a few psi low?
Its main function is to accurately warn you when your tire pressure becomes low enough that you are beginning to risk catastrophic tire failure, which could be deadly at highway speeds. There are other fuel economy benefits but the regulations behind it were a direct response to the Ford Explorer rollover accidents.
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