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  #301  
Old 23 November 2016, 04:02 PM
Meka Meka is offline
 
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Yeah, that part I figured out. But the ETAs the app gives also seem to be color coded, and I'm not sure if it's just to give an additional alert to the same traffic conditions depicted on the map or something else.
  #302  
Old 23 November 2016, 04:09 PM
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I've noticed the same thing. And the ETA and color will update automatically to yellow or red. It seems like this is warning that the ETA just got longer, but I'm not sure what specifically triggers the color change.
  #303  
Old 23 November 2016, 05:25 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Sorry, I misread the question. Maybe yellow or red if longer than usual for that time of day? I notice I sometimes get a green message "You are on the fastest route and your route is clear" or a red message "Fastest route despite slowdown on ABC." I had not noticed the ETA being a different color, but it would make sense to mean basically:

"The trip that usually takes 30 minuets at 5 pm on a weekday will take 45 minuets today..."
  #304  
Old 23 November 2016, 05:50 PM
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How long does it take to do 45 minuets?
  #305  
Old 23 November 2016, 07:48 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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My daughter was playing half speed, so a long time, but she has been practicing and can do them more quickly. As for me, let's just say my prime playing days are behind me.
  #306  
Old 23 November 2016, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
How long does it take to do 45 minuets?
In high school I did I report on George Orwell's 1984. If you've read the book you might remember the "Two Minutes Hate", a daily two minutes of propaganda vilifying some unnamed enemy. Throughout my report I called it the "Two Minuets Hate".

You might think that was an over reliance on spellcheck, and I guess it kind of was. Certainly the fact that it didn't flag it as a misspelling gave me a false sense of confidence. But really I was just a bad speller. I spelled it wrong in not just one place but every place because for some reason "minutes" looked wrong to me.
  #307  
Old 23 November 2016, 08:14 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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WB, when I read your post, my first thought was "There was no spell check in high school...oh, wait."

I'm a not terrific speller but an awful typist.
  #308  
Old 23 November 2016, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
WB, when I read your post, my first thought was "There was no spell check in high school...oh, wait."
According to your profile you're 10 years older than me. Technically, there were word processors with spell check in the 1980s, although I imagine not many high school students had access to one at home. Although my family got our first computer when I was in third grade, circa 1988, and I'm sure it came with a word processing program that included a spell check feature. Actually, I kind of remember seeing TV ads when I was a kid for a typewriter that had a spell check feature. From what I remember of the ads it seemed like it just beeped if it thought you misspelled a word. Does anyone else remember those?
  #309  
Old 23 November 2016, 10:10 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Yes, I thought you were in your mid 30's and honestly did not think there was spell check the way I think of it when you would have been in HS, but of course there was in the mid 90's WordPerfect, etc. Anyway, I come from a family of late adopters so although we had an electric typewriter in the mid 80's, It would have been a basic model and I do not recall a spell checker. Does not mean they did not exist of course.
  #310  
Old 24 November 2016, 12:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
How long does it take to do 45 minuets?
Usually, it takes the same time as 30 minuets.
  #311  
Old 24 November 2016, 01:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
...I kind of remember seeing TV ads when I was a kid for a typewriter that had a spell check feature. From what I remember of the ads it seemed like it just beeped if it thought you misspelled a word. Does anyone else remember those?
They made a typewriter in the late eighties which had a tiny screen for one line. It would spell check and allow editing then print the line before moving on to the next.
  #312  
Old 25 November 2016, 12:08 AM
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I was just listening to a story on NPR that included someone in Japan speaking through a translator. The translator used the term "baby boomers" to refer to Japanese people in their late 60s and early 70s. Did Japan experience a rise in birth rates in the 1940s like the US, or was the translator just using an American expression to refer to that generation?

Last edited by WildaBeast; 25 November 2016 at 12:14 AM.
  #313  
Old 25 November 2016, 12:52 AM
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The most common word I hear for that generation is "post-war" but there is a name like baby boom which translate to something like the "bump" generation. (There were two baby booms - on after the war and another later around the late sixties, early seventies. The bumps were born just after the war.) I listened to the NPR story but I couldn't hear which phrase was translated. My guess is he used the word for the post-war boom. (Not a very good translation since it doesn't quite correspond to the Baby Boom generation.)

Last edited by ganzfeld; 25 November 2016 at 12:58 AM.
  #314  
Old 25 November 2016, 01:38 AM
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re the Computer word processing topic, we had computers in high school in the eighties, but they were used for one term as part of maths and we did basic programing. The same at uni, it was pretty much the same subject actually. But the new "School of Technology" opened the year I started uni (I think) and was adjacent to the school of science buildings. Actually I think it was actually the Division of Science and Technology divided into the two schools I mentioned.

I didn't have much to do with a word processor until I did a short term course in word perfect in the mid 90's when I was looking for work and trying to increase my skills. I also learned to type in a similar course, on a typewriter. And let me tell you when I started work, in medial research, my fellow scientist were surprised I could touch type.

in fact when I was at school, typing was still a subject, in grades 9 and 10. It was mainly meant for girls who were going to leave school at the end of grade 10 to be secretaires. It involved more then touch typing. You learnt the correct format for a business report, newsletter, memo etc.
  #315  
Old 25 November 2016, 10:17 AM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
I've noticed the same thing. And the ETA and color will update automatically to yellow or red. It seems like this is warning that the ETA just got longer, but I'm not sure what specifically triggers the color change.
It's generally to show you what traffic conditions ahead of you will be like.
From my observations, it changes based on how close in time/or distance your are to the problem areas.

Also, there are two shades of red for heavy traffic. If you see the really dark red, find another route, you are going to be stuck in some extremely heavy, possibly not moving traffic.
  #316  
Old 25 November 2016, 01:03 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
re the Computer word processing topic, we had computers in high school in the eighties, but they were used for one term as part of maths and we did basic programing. The same at uni, it was pretty much the same subject actually. But the new "School of Technology" opened the year I started uni (I think) and was adjacent to the school of science buildings. Actually I think it was actually the Division of Science and Technology divided into the two schools I mentioned.

I didn't have much to do with a word processor until I did a short term course in word perfect in the mid 90's when I was looking for work and trying to increase my skills. I also learned to type in a similar course, on a typewriter. And let me tell you when I started work, in medial research, my fellow scientist were surprised I could touch type.

in fact when I was at school, typing was still a subject, in grades 9 and 10. It was mainly meant for girls who were going to leave school at the end of grade 10 to be secretaires. It involved more then touch typing. You learnt the correct format for a business report, newsletter, memo etc.
Back in the 1980s I remember that dedicated word processor machines such as ones from Wang and Lexington were common, at least in academia. By the time i finished grad school in 1989 the office staff had switched from the Lexington to IBM PCs using WordPerfect. There may have been a WordStar phase in there well.

Nick
  #317  
Old 25 November 2016, 02:54 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasla View Post
re the Computer word processing topic, we had computers in high school in the eighties, but they were used for one term as part of maths and we did basic programing. The same at uni, it was pretty much the same subject actually. But the new "School of Technology" opened the year I started uni (I think) and was adjacent to the school of science buildings. Actually I think it was actually the Division of Science and Technology divided into the two schools I mentioned.

I didn't have much to do with a word processor until I did a short term course in word perfect in the mid 90's when I was looking for work and trying to increase my skills. I also learned to type in a similar course, on a typewriter. And let me tell you when I started work, in medial research, my fellow scientist were surprised I could touch type.

in fact when I was at school, typing was still a subject, in grades 9 and 10. It was mainly meant for girls who were going to leave school at the end of grade 10 to be secretaires. It involved more then touch typing. You learnt the correct format for a business report, newsletter, memo etc.
I was just talking about this with a coworker who is retiring next month. She is turning 70 next year. She said the replacement person will need a new keyboard because all the letters are worn off hers, but she doesn't care herself as she's the fastest touch typist I have ever encountered. I recalled learning to touch type in the early 80's in grade 9 on a manual typewriter with nail polish over the letters. The grade 10's got to use the electric typewriters.

My co-worker recalled at work being upgraded to a computer with a mouse and all the admin staff were so skeptical because they were used to using F keys to do everything that we now use menus for. How times have changed, but I still use ctrl-c, v, x, b and u.
  #318  
Old 26 November 2016, 11:18 AM
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Crius of CoH Crius of CoH is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sooeygun View Post
My co-worker recalled at work being upgraded to a computer with a mouse and all the admin staff were so skeptical because they were used to using F keys to do everything that we now use menus for. How times have changed, but I still use ctrl-c, v, x, b and u.
Keyboard shortcuts are usually still faster than using the mouse... assuming one has facility with the keyboard and the willingness to learn 'em.
  #319  
Old 26 November 2016, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Theodorakis View Post
Back in the 1980s I remember that dedicated word processor machines such as ones from Wang and Lexington were common, at least in academia. By the time i finished grad school in 1989 the office staff had switched from the Lexington to IBM PCs using WordPerfect. There may have been a WordStar phase in there well.

Nick
The lady that taught my word perfect was a former secretary who became a business studies and typing teacher at school (if memory serves) she was in her 50's I am guessing and since this was the early '90's I would say she started her career on manual typewriters before switching to electronic typewriters and then to word processors. I remember her talking about the problems with RSI when electronic typewriters first came in. After showing us a feature you could do on word perfect she would say "That's why they call it Word Perfect!" She obviously had seen a few changes in her career and really liked this one.

While we are on the topic, my Mum has decide to teach my Dad to type.
  #320  
Old 27 November 2016, 02:52 AM
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