snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > History

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 08 March 2015, 04:30 PM
A Turtle Named Mack's Avatar
A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
Join Date: 21 June 2007
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 21,451
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianB View Post
As Richard W points out, it looks like a medieval representation of a comet. Nothing indicates that it's artificial let alone extraterrestrial.
Oh, you are very wrong there. As a comet, it certainly would be extraterrestrial.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 08 March 2015, 05:51 PM
Andrew of Ware's Avatar
Andrew of Ware Andrew of Ware is offline
 
Join Date: 22 April 2003
Location: Ware, Hertfordshire, England
Posts: 8,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianB View Post
As miserable as Chariots was for me the experience did have a silver lining. Not long after selling Chariots I bought a book called Crash Goes the Chariots, which wasn't perfect and was a bit too religious for my tastes (the author was a Biblical scholar) but it nicely debunked everything Von Daniken said. The author interviewed archeologists and I remember how angry they were over how Von Daniken misrepresented things like the Sarcophagus lid of Pacal the Great.
You may be interested in a book I bought (but then lent it to someone and never got back) called Some Trust in Chariots. It is a complete debunking of von Daniken. A selection of experts write a chapter each on their particular field. Some are Christian - but they don't let that get in the way of what they are saying. There is also a Jewish scholar (writing about what Daniken says on what Christians call the Old Testament), a Professor of Archaeology (writing about what Daniken says on the Aztec and Mayan remains), an Egyptologist and so on. To be fair to Daniken, more than one of them acknowledges that he has highlighted some interesting remains for which archaeologists have no explanation, but then ruins everything by claiming an extra-terrestial origin.

My favourite chapter is the last one where the author says that von Daniken missed a very obvious example of something that must be extra-terrestial in origin ... cricket.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 08 March 2015, 06:46 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,239
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
One of my favourite secondhand bookstores used to shelve Chariots of the Gods in their scifi section.
I've seen at least one other store do that also.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 08 March 2015, 07:06 PM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is online now
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 12,542
Default

I think it was either Barnes & Noble or Borders that did that.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 08 March 2015, 08:18 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,239
Default

I'm thinking of a used-book store in Penn Yan; but I was also thinking that I might have seen it done in more than one place.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 09 March 2015, 01:22 AM
Crius of CoH's Avatar
Crius of CoH Crius of CoH is offline
 
Join Date: 13 February 2006
Location: Paragon City (Cranston), RI
Posts: 1,825
Default

Man, I loved all those Von Daniken and Berlitz books. Not because I thought they were The Truth, but because they sparked my imagination. I've got about five or six dozen paperbacks from the heady days of the 1970's when you couldn't swing an ancient astronaut without hitting a pile of books on Atlantis or UFOs. My favorite is probably Our Mysterious Spaceship Moon, but a copy of Velikovsky's Worlds In Collision ranks second. I liked Von Daniken's Gold of the Gods the best of his stuff; it described tunnels in South America "clearly" carved by lasers.

Rubbish, but glorious rubbish!
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 09 March 2015, 04:37 AM
Psihala's Avatar
Psihala Psihala is offline
 
Join Date: 28 February 2001
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 7,985
Default

I was in Junior High School when the movie version of Chariots of the Gods came out (it may have been earlier). I remember it as being quite the topic of discussion at school. Some swallowed the film's message completely, but quite a few panned it as "stupid."

I don't remember if the sequel, Return of the Gods, came out after I'd already entered High School or not, but I remember it being just as dumb as the first one.

Several years ago, when Laser Discs were still fairly new, Chariots of the Gods was released for the home market. It was on sale (I wonder why? ), but I picked it up anyway.

I don't think I even made it to side 2 of the disc, and never watched it again. I still have it, but I don't think my LD player works any more.

Pity.

~Psihala

Last edited by Psihala; 09 March 2015 at 04:44 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 09 March 2015, 07:15 AM
BrianB's Avatar
BrianB BrianB is offline
 
Join Date: 03 March 2000
Location: Camarillo, CA
Posts: 3,541
Icon18

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
One of my favourite secondhand bookstores used to shelve Chariots of the Gods in their scifi section.
That. Is. Awesome!
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Oh, you are very wrong there. As a comet, it certainly would be extraterrestrial.
Point taken. I should have said evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware View Post
You may be interested in a book I bought (but then lent it to someone and never got back) called Some Trust in Chariots.
I'll look that one up -- thanks!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crius of CoH View Post
I've got about five or six dozen paperbacks from the heady days of the 1970's when you couldn't swing an ancient astronaut without hitting a pile of books on Atlantis or UFOs.
That, I think, is the one interesting aspect of this is the whole ancient astronaut craze of the '70s. It was certainly an interesting cultural phenomenon.
Quote:
My favorite is probably Our Mysterious Spaceship Moon, but a copy of Velikovsky's Worlds In Collision ranks second.
I've only heard of the former but I did read Velikovsky's Worlds In Collision, mainly because I read a debunking of it by Carl Sagan. If I had to give credit to an originator of the ancient astronaut craze it would be Velikovsky.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psihala View Post
I was in Junior High School when the movie version of Chariots of the Gods came out (it may have been earlier).
Did you ever see In Search of Ancient Astronauts? I remember that one being shown multiple times on late night TV. As the IMDb mentions it was based on the earlier German-made Chariots of the Gods, which I only saw once.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 09 March 2015, 07:27 AM
Gutter Monkey's Avatar
Gutter Monkey Gutter Monkey is offline
 
Join Date: 13 December 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3,994
Default

Why am I not surprised that a whole bunch of Snopesters had a formative experience in getting angry at Von Daniken when they were younger?
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 09 March 2015, 02:37 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,239
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crius of CoH View Post
Velikovsky's Worlds In Collision [. . .]

Rubbish, but glorious rubbish!
Seconding that, at least as far as Velikovsky. It's a great read; or at least I thought so many years ago, I haven't re-read it recently.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 09 March 2015, 04:38 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
Join Date: 27 March 2004
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 4,410
Default

I seem to recall Carl Sagan saying that any thing von Danikin did not understand, he attributed to beings from outerspace. And that included algebra.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 09 March 2015, 05:01 PM
Andrew of Ware's Avatar
Andrew of Ware Andrew of Ware is offline
 
Join Date: 22 April 2003
Location: Ware, Hertfordshire, England
Posts: 8,017
Default

Today most archaeologists, when they don't understand something say that it's for 'ritual practices' or it's 'religious'.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 09 March 2015, 05:33 PM
Psihala's Avatar
Psihala Psihala is offline
 
Join Date: 28 February 2001
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 7,985
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianB View Post


Did you ever see In Search of Ancient Astronauts? I remember that one being shown multiple times on late night TV. As the IMDb mentions it was based on the earlier German-made Chariots of the Gods, which I only saw once.
I may have, though it doesn't ring a bell. I'll have to look into that one further.

Quote:
Today most archaeologists, when they don't understand something say that it's for 'ritual practices' or it's 'religious'.
Whenever I hear an archaeologist explain something they don't understand, what I usually hear is "We don't know." I have no idea how common that is, though.

~Psihala
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 09 March 2015, 08:54 PM
Gutter Monkey's Avatar
Gutter Monkey Gutter Monkey is offline
 
Join Date: 13 December 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3,994
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware View Post
Today most archaeologists, when they don't understand something say that it's for 'ritual practices' or it's 'religious'.
Citation needed.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 10 March 2015, 01:32 AM
Crius of CoH's Avatar
Crius of CoH Crius of CoH is offline
 
Join Date: 13 February 2006
Location: Paragon City (Cranston), RI
Posts: 1,825
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
Citation needed.
"Note the ritualistic manner in which this common phrase is offered up. No one knows why; we assume it is a prayer to the god "Ynn-TAR'nehtt", who was worshipped via electromagnetic fields by the peoples of the early 21st Century. Scholars have drawn a tentative connection between worship of Ynn-TAR'nett and another deity, Wheca-Pedya, whose worship also involved the phrase."
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 10 March 2015, 04:15 AM
Psihala's Avatar
Psihala Psihala is offline
 
Join Date: 28 February 2001
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 7,985
Default

Might I interest you in the work of one Robert Nathan, and his definitive (if now dated) text on The Digging of the Weans? (Somewhat edited audio version by Theodor Bikel here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCISMr9Zt6k)

Sadly, it makes no mention of any deity of "Ynn-TAR'nett", but, as I mentioned, it is somewhat dated - and may not reflect more recent discoveries.

~Psihala

Last edited by Psihala; 10 March 2015 at 04:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 10 March 2015, 01:10 PM
Alarm's Avatar
Alarm Alarm is offline
 
Join Date: 26 May 2011
Location: Nepean, ON
Posts: 5,657
Yow!



Are Ynn-TAR'nett and Wheca-Pedya newly discovered Great Old Ones??

The spelling is very reminiscent of Yog-Sothot and Shub-Niggurath.

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Ynn-TAR'nett UCLA wgah'nagl fhtagn! Fhatgn!
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 10 March 2015, 07:26 PM
Andrew of Ware's Avatar
Andrew of Ware Andrew of Ware is offline
 
Join Date: 22 April 2003
Location: Ware, Hertfordshire, England
Posts: 8,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
Citation needed.
I don't know if you've ever seen the now defunct archaeology show Time team, but here Tony Robinson (AKA Baldrick) is always making of the archaeologists by saying things are for 'ritual'. The funniest book I have read on archaeology is Bluff Your Way in Archaeology by Paul Bahn. In its glossary are the following entries:

Dating Methods: Courtship rituals adopted by archaeologists who want to share digs

Hypothesis: A guess

Theory: A series of hypotheses

Posthole: Any hole too small to be a storage pit

Storage pit: Any hole too big to be a posthole

and, of course (if you want a cite),

Ritual: All-purpose explanation where nothing else comes to mind.

The author, a practising archaeologist, puts in a lot of proper information in between the jokes. The book is only 62 pages long, but should be read by any student of archaeology. Great fun.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 10 March 2015, 08:58 PM
Psihala's Avatar
Psihala Psihala is offline
 
Join Date: 28 February 2001
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 7,985
Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post


Are Ynn-TAR'nett and Wheca-Pedya newly discovered Great Old Ones??
Perhaps a poor choice of words.

In the nearly 60 years since the excavations of Wean society reached a fever pitch in 7956, culminating in the live broadcast(1) of the opening of the "Tomb of May•C" in n.yok, and Nathan's publishing his summation of its findings 4 years later, not much more was learned from the few remaining fragments found.

This is not to say that any omission of "Ynn-TAR'nett" and "Wheca-Pedya" from the original texts indicates that they did not exist or were unknown. Indeed, the presence of Ynn-TAR'nett and Wheca-Pedya were undoubtedly known to the Weans at some point, but they seem to be a more global phenomena and therefore outside the scope of Nathan's particular subject matter. Still, it is perhaps possible that Professor Olbelgerst-Levy said more than he knew when he was asked to speculate on the "eyes" found in a sub-chamber of the tomb when he said, "perhaps [May•C] wished to watch through these eyes what his people were doing, or, he wished through these eyes his people could watch him. Who knows?"(2)

It isn't known specifically known when the rise of Ynn-TAR'nett and Wheca-Pedya came to be, or what the specific relationship is between the two. It is known that papyrus records began to drop off about the time of the rise of what is widely regarded as a potent cult with an insatiable thrust for knowledge. Indeed, there is some disagreement as to Ynn-TAR'nett's true name. Some scholars believe the translations of the glyphs describing the cult are in error, and that it was simply known as the Ynn-TAR -- but so alluring was it to those who came to discover it, that some historians believe it eventually became known as Ynn-TAR's net.

The rise of Wheca-Pedya seems to have come later than Ynn-TAR, perhaps as a means of summarizing the vast knowledge of the latter for easier digestion, though the interpretation of the resulting information -- indeed, the authenticity of the very information itself -- is a topic that is still a point of heated debate to this day.(3)

At any rate, the only reference to Ynn-TAR'nett as it pertains to the Weans is a small following of scholars that insist it was nothing more than the invention of a Wean known only as "Algor" - but this claim is not widely accepted amongst historians.


------------
(1) Live broadcast, "Report on the Weans", pulled from an archival copy.

(2) Ibid. It should be noted that despite extensive excavations of the "tomb" and its sub-basement, no sarcophagus was ever found. It has since been concluded that the tomb was not a tomb at all but a sort of shrine to May•C instead. The shrine was found to contain many valuables, and it was therefore deduced that the "eyes" were less a means for the exchange of two-way communication than for May•C's loyal servants to watch over those coming into the shrine and ensure none of its valuables were removed without proper authorization.

(3) There appears to be a subset of the cult whose sole purpose was to either "correct" or "clarify" the wisdom of Ynn-TAR'nett, known as "The Scopes" (or perhaps "snoops" - the translation is uncertain).

Last edited by Psihala; 10 March 2015 at 09:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 11 March 2015, 07:05 AM
Gutter Monkey's Avatar
Gutter Monkey Gutter Monkey is offline
 
Join Date: 13 December 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 3,994
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware View Post
Tony Robinson

The funniest book I have read on archaeology

Ah, so you based that opinion off a non-archaeologist and a comedy book. I suspected as much.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How not to rob a coin shop BinaryHedgehog Police Blotter 0 13 August 2014 05:58 PM
Stop motion coin animation "Insert Coin" BlueStar Fauxtography 44 15 December 2010 11:30 PM
Coin logs/trees Mosherette Fauxtography 14 20 September 2010 07:25 AM
FYI: Godless coin claim a fake snopes Snopes Spotting 0 27 April 2009 09:41 PM
Coin weights snopes Trivia 11 04 June 2007 11:02 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.