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  #21  
Old 10 May 2013, 07:41 PM
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I'm just going to carry a stick. I'm not going to hit her unless she menaces me or my family first.
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  #22  
Old 10 May 2013, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Ryda Wong, EBfCo. View Post
Sadly, those fences often DON'T work with many dogs.

Personally, I hate them. They don't protect the dog from things entering the yard and a dog with a sufficient head of steam often just blows off the shock.
We tried using an invisible fence to keep one of our dogs at home due to his horrible problem with running off if he was left alone for even a couple of minutes. It was completely ineffective.

We solved the problem by just not leaving him by himself- when we went inside, so did the dog.
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  #23  
Old 11 May 2013, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Mad Jay View Post
I'm just going to carry a stick. I'm not going to hit her unless she menaces me or my family first.
That's fair. But 1) don't wave it at her in a threatening fashion (if she really is a menace, you probably haven't time for threats; and if she isn't, you might turn her into one) and 2) try not to assume that "dog approaching" automatically means "dog menacing". If you don't know much about dogs, it can sometimes be hard to tell the difference; but, unless the dog is entirely insane, there are indicator signs.
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  #24  
Old 11 May 2013, 04:38 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
We tried using an invisible fence to keep one of our dogs at home due to his horrible problem with running off if he was left alone for even a couple of minutes. It was completely ineffective.
I researched a good bit on those, as I had wanted to sue one for my big guy. It takes a considerable amount of training of the dog. You have to repeatedly allow the dog to approach the perimeter with its collar on so that it becomes keenly aware that the edge of the yard means it gets a jolt. You should do this with the dog on a leash so that it never gets to discover during training that if it takes a run or a leap at the edge the zap will be over very quickly. I would think a long leash would be better so that the dog discovers for itself by moving fairly freely where the boundaries are - if you lead it into the danger zone repeatedly, it might get the message that when it is on the leash in the yard, Owner is going to make it get zapped.

Even with the training, on occasion a dog will get overstimulated and breach the perimeter
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  #25  
Old 11 May 2013, 10:34 PM
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Yeah, I think the problem with our dog was that when he was a puppy, he got tangled in an electric fence, so he panicked as soon as he felt the trigger from the shock collar.
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  #26  
Old 12 May 2013, 03:23 AM
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I take my (well trained/controlled) dogs in public a lot, anywhere pets are welcome, but I never let them approach people unless someone asks to/wants to pet them. Unfortunately in the case of my German Shepherd me keeping her close to my side when around people so she wouldnt aproach anyone unwanted seemed to be viewed by people to indicate that she was not friendly. Actually she loved people and loved when people would come pet her. I did try to make her look friendlier by putting pink and purple colors on her, things that said "I'm friendly" or funny bandanas like "I can't hold my licker" and "don't just stand there, pet me!"
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  #27  
Old 13 May 2013, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
if it takes a run or a leap at the edge the zap will be over very quickly.
Apparently most of you have had experience with the wired version of the invisible fence, which only zaps while the dog+collar are going over the wire.

The wireless version keeps zapping until the dog returns back to the yard. I've had a wireless one for 12 years, and I've trained 5 Australian Shepherds to not escape. Even my first Aussie, J, who was familiar with the wired version of the fence, gave me a look of disgust when he tried to run away. He ran back in the yard and that was the end of his escape artist career. [I have a feeling the previous owners may have let him go because of that, actually]

They only have sneaked out a couple times when the batteries ran out. That's obviously my fault.

OY
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  #28  
Old 13 May 2013, 01:43 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Well, yes, the versions I have seen have had a wire you string along the perimeter you want the dog to stay within (because it is an alternative to a fence, they are generally depicted buried, but they do not need to be). When the dog gets X distance from the wire, a radio signal from the wire causes a small shock to be transmitted. many are outfitted to increase the jolt (never dangerously so) as the dog gets closer. Now you are talking about a wireless version that zaps when the dog is away from the designated area. Would that be set up so that there is a signal sent from a central location to the property, like a WiFi router, and the collar zaps whenever it is not receiving that signal so that it continues wherever the dog might have roamed, until it is back within range of the signal?
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  #29  
Old 13 May 2013, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Now you are talking about a wireless version that zaps when the dog is away from the designated area. Would that be set up so that there is a signal sent from a central location to the property, like a WiFi router, and the collar zaps whenever it is not receiving that signal so that it continues wherever the dog might have roamed, until it is back within range of the signal?
Yes, that's what it does. It creates a circle similar to a radio station's broadcast area. The base station has a built in UPS that prevents any shocking in the case of a power outage. Here it is. (PetSafe's website wouldn't open here).

It's also portable as you can take it with you when visiting family, which I have done in the past.

Understandably, some properties may not be suitable to use a radio-based one (because of the circle shape zone it creates), but I do have a rectangular shaped lot, and I was able to set it up so that my 2 Aussies can have most of the back yard, the driveway, the walkway up to the front door, and the side of the house. Essentially they can go anywhere except the front yard (thank goodness!)

OY
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  #30  
Old 14 May 2013, 12:40 AM
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I was walking my Shiba tonight when a random lady accosted us on the sidewalk.

Bea is a lover once you get to know her, but she is very protective of me and so doesn't like random street snorgles. She will generally give total strangers a small "back off" grrr. She never escalates beyond that (she's had little kids pull her curly tail, etc) but it's pretty clear to almost anyone that she wants to get to know you on HER terms.

We've never had problems with strangers doing the "aww a little fox can I pet her?" "she's a little shy, but thank you for the compliment" okay move on. Until this lady.

She kneels down to Bea's level, puts her face in hers and starts doing a two-handed ear scritch. Bea "grrrs" and pulls away. Lady insists "oh sweetie you're cute! Dogs love me! I have a dog!"

I said "she doesn't want to be petted" and pulled her away, and the lady FOLLOWED! I had to practically run away. What a loon.

I'm surprised she has all her limbs intact if she acts like that with strange dogs on the street.
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  #31  
Old 14 May 2013, 04:29 PM
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Wow, that is stupid.

Whenever I approach a dog I don't know, I crouch down and hold out a hand and let it sniff me, then gauge its reaction. After asking the owner if it's okay.
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  #32  
Old 14 May 2013, 06:21 PM
Ellestar Ellestar is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plurabelle View Post
She kneels down to Bea's level, puts her face in hers and starts doing a two-handed ear scritch. Bea "grrrs" and pulls away. Lady insists "oh sweetie you're cute! Dogs love me! I have a dog!"

I said "she doesn't want to be petted" and pulled her away, and the lady FOLLOWED! I had to practically run away. What a loon.

I'm surprised she has all her limbs intact if she acts like that with strange dogs on the street.
I have a similar story. I used to live in Wrigleyville and the Cubs were doing well at that point in time. I would walk my labrador around during/after games because the neighborhood was glowing and I wanted to share in the good feelings.

One day, an obviously inebriated young man asked if he could pet my dog. I said yes because he loved pets. This man grabbed my dog's muzzle and gave him a big kiss on his nose. Luckily for this guy, my dog was as shocked as I was.

There's a difference between petting and grabbing.
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  #33  
Old 14 May 2013, 09:04 PM
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Slightly off-topic; but I've been on the other side of the dog petting debate. I was attending my first dog show as a visitor, and stopped to talk to a man grooming an adorable Cairn terrier. After talking to him I turned to the dog and squealed "And I just know you're going to win!" and gave him a thorough scritching around his ruff and ears.

Suddenly it occurred to me what I had done and I said in a small voice "I just ruined all your grooming, didn't I?" The poor man just stoically nodded his head. He was gracious about the whole thing, but I was mortified and kind of slunk away.

I knew better. I really did. But...DOGGIE!!!!!
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  #34  
Old 15 May 2013, 01:27 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Whenever I approach a dog I don't know, I crouch down and hold out a hand and let it sniff me, then gauge its reaction. After asking the owner if it's okay.
Personally, I never crouch down in front of a dog. That's a good way for the dog to bite you in the face. [I got bit once in the face by a cocker spaniel that my friend owned. Not a severe bite, but I learned my lesson].

OY
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  #35  
Old 15 May 2013, 03:35 PM
Ryda Wong, EBfCo. Ryda Wong, EBfCo. is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
Suddenly it occurred to me what I had done and I said in a small voice "I just ruined all your grooming, didn't I?" The poor man just stoically nodded his head. He was gracious about the whole thing, but I was mortified and kind of slunk away.
Trust me. It was not the first time that happened. Visitors destroying grooming by petting the cute puppies is a dog show hazard. You're just lucky you got a nice handler! Some of them would have taken your head off!
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  #36  
Old 15 May 2013, 03:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
Personally, I never crouch down in front of a dog. That's a good way for the dog to bite you in the face. [I got bit once in the face by a cocker spaniel that my friend owned. Not a severe bite, but I learned my lesson].

OY
I don't do it directly in front of the dog, I do it a few feet away with my hand out and give the dog the option to approach me. Mostly I try to avoid looming over a strange dog or anything else that is likely to be interpreted as hostile or threatening.
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  #37  
Old 15 May 2013, 04:18 PM
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When I was taking my hounds through training I was surprised at how many people on the street thought I was heartless. They are trained now to heel right beside me as I walk, sit when I stop, and ignore other dogs and people that we meet on the sidewalk.

I remember one time mid training when I was teaching Moose to sit and ignore people. A woman came up to me and in a snotty voice told me that " a dog's gotta do what a dog's gotta do." I told her that this dog's gotta obey me. My basset may be only 14" at the shoulder but he is very tall standing on his hind feet. He weighs close to 60 pounds and loves to give kisses. Undisciplined, he could very easily knock over children or small adults.
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  #38  
Old 15 May 2013, 04:57 PM
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And that's really only a medium dog. A truly large or giant breed dog can do some serious damage if not properly trained and controlled. An untrained jumpy 10 lb dog may be considered (wrongly) adorable but when a 150-200 lb mastiff or St Bernard jumps up to lick your face it's a very different story.
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  #39  
Old 15 May 2013, 05:23 PM
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Actually on that topic one thing that really, really annoys me as the owner of a small dog is small dog owners that think because their dog is small it is not necessary to train/socialize them.

The absolute worst sub-category of this are small dog owners that think it is acceptable or worse yet "cute" when their small dog is aggressive to people or other animals.

Martini's not the most personable dog ever and he is skittish and barky around strangers, but I would never tolerate him actually being outright aggressive or think it's cute or funny just because he's small.
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  #40  
Old 15 May 2013, 05:28 PM
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I don't know how much of it is the attitude Joe references, and how much is a tendency for smaller dogs to be more aggressive, but I meet far more aggressive little dogs than aggressive big dogs.

I don't like them, and I like their owners even less. The nastiness of their tiny little dog is what annoys me most about my neighbors across the hall.
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