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Old 09 May 2013, 07:30 PM
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Default No, I Do Not Want to Pet Your Dog

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Sometime in the last decade, dogs achieved dominion over urban America. They are everywhere now, allowed in places that used to belong exclusively to humans, and sometimes only to human adults: the office, restaurants, museums, buses, trains, malls, supermarkets, barber shops, banks, post offices. Even at the park and other places where dogs belong, they’ve been given free rein. Dogs are frequently allowed to wander off leash, to run toward you and around you, to run across the baseball field or basketball court, to get up in your grill. Even worse than the dogs are the owners, who seem never to consider whether there may be people in the gym/office/restaurant/museum who do not care to be in close proximity to their dogs. After all, what kind of monster would have a problem with a poor innocent widdle doggie? It’s a dog’s world. We just live in it. And it’s awful. Bad dogs!
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/a...our_cafes.html
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  #2  
Old 09 May 2013, 09:21 PM
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Yesterday the mail carrier was trapped on my porch for a while by the next door neighbor's dog.
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  #3  
Old 09 May 2013, 09:32 PM
Ryda Wong, EBfCo. Ryda Wong, EBfCo. is offline
 
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The problem isn't the dogs being in public. It's stupid owners with bringing their dogs into the public.

You do not allow your dog to approach a human being unless that human being invites the contact. Not even in a crowded elevator. You train your dog to have its primary focus on you, not on what's around you and to respond if you ask it to do something. And, while your dog is in public, you WATCH YOUR DOG. Don't chat mindlessly on your cell while fido does whatever he chooses.
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  #4  
Old 09 May 2013, 11:01 PM
moonfall moonfall is offline
 
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A lot of dogs try to approach me on the street or around my apartment complex. While I like dogs and welcome the attention, I can understand why some people would be unhappy with over-friendly dogs, especially if they're afraid or allergic.
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Old 09 May 2013, 11:28 PM
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I live in a neighborhood of single houses that are, at the narrowest points, about 10 feet from each other.

I'm not joking when I say that starting with the neighbor on my right, skipping me (because I don't have any pets any more), and continuing for about 6 or 7 (maybe more..I have just never noticed) houses to my left, every...single...house has at least one dog that will bark at every little thing that walks past.

Luckily, they don't usually keep their dogs out there...but what a miserable racket when they are outside when someone is just trying to walk down the sidewalk. DOYC forbid that they are actually walking *their* own dog as well.

(Okay..sorry for that only semi-related rant. )
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  #6  
Old 10 May 2013, 12:30 AM
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J.G. Walker J.G. Walker is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryda Wong, EBfCo. View Post
You do not allow your dog to approach a human being unless that human being invites the contact. Not even in a crowded elevator. You train your dog to have its primary focus on you, not on what's around you and to respond if you ask it to do something. And, while your dog is in public, you WATCH YOUR DOG. Don't chat mindlessly on your cell while fido does whatever he chooses.
Hey, this would, for the most part, also work for parents with ill-behaved kids! The whole pay-attention-to-what's-going-on part, I mean.
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Old 10 May 2013, 12:48 AM
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I've always just assumed that people don't want dogs in their face and acted accordingly. One of the first things I've taught all my dogs is what I call 'trail etiquette'--learning to ignore joggers, bicyclists, et al while on a walk.
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Old 10 May 2013, 01:21 AM
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I might borrow a phrase from that article, I am now officially 'canine-intolerant'.
While a well trained, happy dog is a joy to see, most dogs I see are neither and my tolerance for an owner who isn't controlling their dog is minimal. Do owners genuinely think that shouting 'it's okay, he's friendly!' is a substitute for control?
The dog situation that left me speechless was when a senior manager at my workplace brought in his new puppy. He brought it round the whole office on the assumption that we would all be thrilled, let it piss on the office carpet in our section, said 'Oh, it's just puppy-pee' and walked off with the dog leaving us staring at our now dog-piss stained carpet.
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Old 10 May 2013, 01:42 AM
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Yep, everything was different 11 years ago. It's over the last decade that dogs started licking reporters. Especially in urban places.

Not to hijack the thread, but anyone also notice over the past decade that journalists have picked up on things that always happened and pretended they were some new trend? Bad reporting like that never happened when I was a kid. Must've started around 2003.
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  #10  
Old 10 May 2013, 01:46 AM
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queen of the caramels queen of the caramels is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I've always just assumed that people don't want dogs in their face and acted accordingly. One of the first things I've taught all my dogs is what I call 'trail etiquette'--learning to ignore joggers, bicyclists, et al while on a walk.

I wish more owners were more like this. While I don't mind dogs neither DH nor the children are comfortable around them.

Whenever some-one tells me thier dog is friendly while one of my children is moving away, I'd rather they then didn't press my child to stroke the dog. Constantly repeating "he won't hurt you" isn't making my child more secure around your dog, sorry...
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  #11  
Old 10 May 2013, 03:09 AM
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Horse Chestnut Horse Chestnut is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I've always just assumed that people don't want dogs in their face and acted accordingly. One of the first things I've taught all my dogs is what I call 'trail etiquette'--learning to ignore joggers, bicyclists, et al while on a walk.
Darby knows the rules, too and he's OK with it, except for kids and little dogs, both of which he loves. So when a kid asks "Can I pet your dog?" and I clear it with the parents, I'll tell him "OK, go say hi." so he can bliss out on kid scritches for a minute. I understand the feelings of the person in the article, but can't we all just get along?
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  #12  
Old 10 May 2013, 04:30 AM
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I don't generally like other people's dogs. I like MY dog. My dog is very easily distracted. There are trails by my house that many people walk their dogs on, about half of them off-leash. My dog is only off leash if I am absolutely certain there are no other dogs around, which is pretty rare. One day, I was walking her (on leash), and a man came driving down the trail with his dog running along side, off leash. His dog saw mine and came tearing toward us. I stopped, made my dog sit, grabbed the slack of my 5 ft. leash to keep her still, and put myself between the strange dog and my dog, yelling "NO!" the man stopped his car and yelled, "It's okay, he's okay! He's friendly! It's okay". I yelled back at him that it was not okay with ME nor my dog, and "okay" wasn't his call to make. He flipped me off and called me a bitch.
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  #13  
Old 10 May 2013, 04:53 AM
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LadyLockeout LadyLockeout is offline
 
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On the flip side, there's also always people who are convinced that your dog wants to be petted by them. That doesn't go well with my blind dog.

Or the people who have children who shriek "DOGGY!!!" and then throw a tantrum when you politely explain to them that they can't pet the doggy, because the doggy doesn't like children and might bite and then the parents go "oh come on s/he loves dogs s/he'll be fine". NFBSK. Ash BITES small children! Keep your child away from my dog after I've warned you off!

And Daisy, she'll jump at faces. She only wants to lick, but she's not very careful with her teeth, so she's another one I keep away from small children. But all the parents see (much of the time) is the big horrid mean woman who won't let their precious molest the small dog.

Dog etiquette needs to be practiced by everyone.
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  #14  
Old 10 May 2013, 01:23 PM
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I am glad my neighbor has an invisible dog fence. His dog is a bit boisterous, and I'm not comfortable around dogs. The only reason I can work comfortably in my yard is that I trust that the Invisible fence works. If I see her crossing the fence, I'm going to start carrying a stick
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  #15  
Old 10 May 2013, 03:40 PM
Ryda Wong, EBfCo. Ryda Wong, EBfCo. is offline
 
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Sadly, those fences often DON'T work with many dogs.

Personally, I hate them. They don't protect the dog from things entering the yard and a dog with a sufficient head of steam often just blows off the shock.
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  #16  
Old 10 May 2013, 03:42 PM
Ryda Wong, EBfCo. Ryda Wong, EBfCo. is offline
 
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You know, when I moved into the apartment complex, I started getting complements from people on the elevator about how well behaved Barkley is.

All we do is get in the elevator and he's in heel position or right in front of me. He may look at another occupant and, if that occupant responds positively to him, he'll wag his tail and invite petting (which he often gets), but he doesn't approach them.

This, to me, is basic behavior that I expect from my dog.

Apparently, it's not all that common, and that ticks me off.
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  #17  
Old 10 May 2013, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Yep, everything was different 11 years ago. It's over the last decade that dogs started licking reporters. Especially in urban places.

Not to hijack the thread, but anyone also notice over the past decade that journalists have picked up on things that always happened and pretended they were some new trend?
Yes... if anything, in the UK dogs were a lot less controlled when I was a child. Apart from the idea of picking up their mess and carrying it around with you in a plastic bag, which was unheard of at the time (we just let our dog go in the long grass, or flicked it into the bushes with a stick - and we counted as among the considerate people for doing that), other people's dogs nearly always came and said hello and wagged their tails happily and so on. Dogs now rarely do that, and their owners usually shout at them and apologize if they even start sniffing about within a few feet of you. I find it a bit sad, really.
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  #18  
Old 10 May 2013, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryda Wong, EBfCo. View Post
Sadly, those fences often DON'T work with many dogs.

Personally, I hate them. They don't protect the dog from things entering the yard and a dog with a sufficient head of steam often just blows off the shock.
Really? I'm getting a stick
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  #19  
Old 10 May 2013, 04:36 PM
St. Alia St. Alia is offline
 
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If you're carrying around a stick, my black lab would definitely be interested in you!

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  #20  
Old 10 May 2013, 05:01 PM
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thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Jay View Post
If I see her crossing the fence, I'm going to start carrying a stick
Careful with that. A dog that otherwise had no intention of attacking you may well attack you if you hit it, or appear about to hit it.
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