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Old 31 May 2008, 04:01 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is online now
 
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Default Popcorn as breakfast cereal

I have heard a few times over the years that around the time of the American Revolution (1770s) and thereabouts, popcorn was eaten in the English colonies/USA as a breakfast cereal. Essentially puffed corn, similar to puffed rice or puffed wheat. With milk poured over it. It seems to me that it would get soggy easily, and that the seedcoats would be really annoying, but you use what you have, I guess. Does anyone know anything more about this - are there good references to this being done?
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Old 31 May 2008, 04:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
I have heard a few times over the years that around the time of the American Revolution (1770s) and thereabouts, popcorn was eaten in the English colonies/USA as a breakfast cereal. Essentially puffed corn, similar to puffed rice or puffed wheat. With milk poured over it. It seems to me that it would get soggy easily, and that the seedcoats would be really annoying, but you use what you have, I guess. Does anyone know anything more about this - are there good references to this being done?
One of the Little House books tells about pouring milk over popcorn, but it was an after dinner treat. I think it was Farmer Boy.
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Old 31 May 2008, 04:11 PM
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One of the Little House books tells about pouring milk over popcorn, but it was an after dinner treat. I think it was Farmer Boy.
Yes, it was Farmer Boy, but it was putting the popcorn in the milk rather than pouring the milk over the popcorn in that case. I remember being fascinated by the idea--the popcorn supposedly absorbed the milk so completely that the level of the liquid would not raise in the glass.

Avril
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  #4  
Old 31 May 2008, 04:44 PM
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http://www.popcorn.org/poppinmonth/history.cfm

Quote:
Colonists mixed ground popcorn with milk and ate it as a breakfast food. Popcorn pudding—made from ground popcorn—was lauded by the likes of Ella Kellogg, Fannie Merritt Farmer and Mary Hamilton Talbott. And shortly after the end of World War II, a shortage of baking flours forced bread makers to substitute up to 25% of wheat flour with ground popped popcorn.
Popcorn as a breakfast cereal doesn't sound that odd or far fetched to me even though it does sound unappetizing. The popcorn would get soggy, but then so does bran or wheat or puffed rice or granola etc. Corn Pops (remember when they were Sugar Corn Pops? Now I think they are just Pops) are essentially puffed (and heavily sugared) corn although that is milled corn and not exactly popped corn- same general idea though.

If I were to eat popcorn as a cereal with milk, I think I would try using caramel corn or some other glaze to keep it from going mushy soggy quite as quickly.
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Old 31 May 2008, 05:00 PM
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Aton Brown mentioned using popcorn as a breakfast cereal in one episode of Good Eats but I don't know where he got the idea. There may be a credit associated with that episode, though.
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Old 01 June 2008, 05:31 AM
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I read about doing that in some children's book (young reader or preteen, not a baby type book) I read as a child... not a Little House book either. Couldn't possibly remember the book though. It also talked about vanilla extract which was a new, exotic, glamourous ingredient at that point in history I guess.

I was intrigued with the idea of popcorn as cereal and tried it.

Bleah.

I'd stick with oatmeal I guess. It was soggy and awful.
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  #7  
Old 02 June 2008, 06:38 AM
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When I was a kid (waaayyyy back in the '70s) I remember my mom eating popcorn with milk like cereal. It didn't look like anything I wanted to try, so I never did.

I don't know if she still eats it anymore, but it wouldn't surprise me if she does.
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Old 02 June 2008, 09:38 AM
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Hubby does it when he can. He quite likes popcorn with milk as a cereal. I can't stand it so don't make it.
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Old 02 June 2008, 10:00 AM
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I could see this working. I might try it.
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Old 27 August 2008, 01:55 PM
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I think I stick to corn flakes too.
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Old 26 October 2008, 01:50 AM
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I would imagine that the popcorn of that era is different than the popcorn we eat now, both in the way that it's popped and the quality.

I was watching "Cities of the Underworld" on the History Channel the other day and saw the "popcorn as breakfast cereal" idea as a factoid before a commercial. I normally don't put much trust in things I see on TV but I would think that the History Channel would vet things like that.
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Old 26 October 2008, 02:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kajerayn View Post
I normally don't put much trust in things I see on TV but I would think that the History Channel would vet things like that.
Maybe they're checking snopes.com now. I suggested it after they aired a segment which included the "ring around the rosie" legend as fact.
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