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  #581  
Old 23 February 2018, 02:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Hans Off View Post
What is “Pep”? Is it a bad thing? I think of it as a derogitory description of over earnest ultra conservative people?

Are you maybe confusing "pep" with "prep" or "preppy"? From good old Wikipedia:

Quote:
Preppy (also spelled preppie) or prep (all abbreviations of the word preparatory) refers to a subculture in the United States associated with the old private Northeastern university-preparatory schools. The terms are used to denote a person seen as characteristic of a student or alumnus of these schools. Characteristics of preps in the past include a particular subcultural speech, vocabulary, dress, mannerisms, etiquette, reflective of an upper-class upbringing.[1]
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  #582  
Old 23 February 2018, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Hans Off View Post
I can’t think of any UK equivalent.
We have the word in UK English, surely, even if we don't have pep rallies? You can talk about "pepping something up a bit" if you want to make it more exciting - adding a bit of spice or flavouring to food, for example.
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  #583  
Old 23 February 2018, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Hans Off View Post
We just have School Sports days which are more egg and spoony than anything else and don’t really require extra pep.
Now that we've cleared up "pep", what the heck is "egg and spoony"? Something to do with footraces with the added complication of trying to carry an egg in a spoon?
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  #584  
Old 23 February 2018, 12:10 PM
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Yes, exactly - referring to egg-and-spoon races, which used to be a staple of primary school sports days, along with the sack race, the parents' race, and (back in the 1970s) the Space Hopper race - the only one I ever won! By secondary school the sports days tend to feature more standard athletic events.

"Egg-and-spoony" isn't actually a phrase though - it's just obvious what it means in this context to anybody in the UK. (Or England anyway - the Scots might all be tossing cabers and wellies and things for all I know).
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  #585  
Old 23 February 2018, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veruca View Post
Are you maybe confusing "pep" with "prep" or "preppy"?
Or references to Pepe the Frog?
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  #586  
Old 23 February 2018, 02:01 PM
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Isn't the pep in pep rally the same pep in Pepsi?
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  #587  
Old 23 February 2018, 02:10 PM
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At the risk of opening a can of worms, what word do the British usually use to describe carbonated beverages?

I'm watching a movie in which an upper class British man referred to it as 'pop' which is the not the term I would have expected.
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  #588  
Old 23 February 2018, 02:15 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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The cliche says fizzy drink, or lemonade. At least, the cliche I'm most familiar with.

Seaboe
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  #589  
Old 23 February 2018, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
Isn't the pep in pep rally the same pep in Pepsi?
Possibly not except by a very long way about. Pepsi's name came from the "pep" in dyspepsia meaning "to digest" as it was supposed to aid in digestion. Similar to Pepto-Bismol or Pepcid AC, both being digestion medications. Pep as in energy is a shortened version of "pepper". Both come from Greek words, but of different spellings (duspeptos for dyspepsia and peperi for pepper). Possibly duspeptos came because peppers could cause indigestion, but I didn't find any proof of that.

Last edited by GenYus234; 23 February 2018 at 02:20 PM. Reason: add quote
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  #590  
Old 23 February 2018, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
At the risk of opening a can of worms, what word do the British usually use to describe carbonated beverages?

I'm watching a movie in which an upper class British man referred to it as 'pop' which is the not the term I would have expected.
It depends really. Fizzy drinks is one term, as Seaboe says. Fizzy pop is one that older people might use, or possibly there's a class-based or regional factor there too (generally, posh people and northerners tend to keep old-fashioned terms longer than non-posh southerners). We don't really use "lemonade" as a generic term - it means fizzy lemonade such as R Whites, which is similar to Sprite but sweeter and without the lime; although sometimes you'll get Sprite for lemonade these days. (I object to calling Sprite "lemonade" for a different reason than Americans do).

I don't really hear people having to refer specifically to fizzy drinks much, though. The most common term is probably "soft drinks", which can also include orange juice and so on. (Not usually tea or coffee). If you were in a pub or being offered a drink and didn't want anything alcoholic, you'd probably ask what soft drinks they had. You might say fizzy drinks, though, I suppose.
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  #591  
Old 23 February 2018, 06:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
The most common term is probably "soft drinks", which can also include orange juice and so on. (Not usually tea or coffee). If you were in a pub or being offered a drink and didn't want anything alcoholic, you'd probably ask what soft drinks they had. You might say fizzy drinks, though, I suppose.
In my experience, the seldom-used term "soft drinks" in America now seems more and more to only include soda/pop/tonic/coke/fizzy drinks, when logically it should also include all non-alcoholic drinks. And do the British Isles not have the beverage Americans call lemonade at all? (Lemon juice, sugar, water - no fizz.)

But on to the question I came here for. Does this forum have a category for "things you were going to ask about but looked up or figured out on your own"? I was trying to find a thread to ask "what’s the deal with Shen Yun?" but did just a bit of research, found an answer, and found it interesting enough to share.
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  #592  
Old 23 February 2018, 06:49 PM
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There is Things you recently figured out It seems to be more stuff you've heard about for years and just now realized, or did not even realize it was a thing (like a pun from a show or band from decades ago), but I think something like you describe would fit. Almost anything goes in SLC threads, IMO. You could also just put it in unhijakable, but I think the former is where I would look if I was browsing around looking for little tidbits of information.

Anyway, you don't have to go to either one, because I am going to ask: Who or what is Shen Yun? I've never heard of them/it.
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  #593  
Old 23 February 2018, 07:17 PM
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Lots to catch up on.

1. Yes I was confusing “pep” with “prep” in my image of it being an activity populated by, lets say, people with smack bottomed faces and sticks up their behinds.

2. Yes I know we pep things up, but I never made that connection, My observation of the no UK equivalent is reference to the rallys themselves (My Love of Worstershire Sauce is evidence that I know about pepping up food!)

3. Yes literally running with and egg in a spoon. See also sack race, wheelbarrow race and three legged race. This is why the UK normally does so well at the olympics.

3b. See also Welly Wanging


4. Fizzy drinks have different names based on region and age, kids round my way tend to call it “Pop” in a pub it is generally soft drinkd or mixers (but that can refer to fruit juice as well) Never soda, unless we are specifically refering to cream soda.

I think Scotland have some bizzare regional names for fizzy drinks but I can’t remember what they are.
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  #594  
Old 23 February 2018, 07:19 PM
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US pep rallies are built around the concept of competitive high school athletics, which I don't think is a thing in the UK.
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  #595  
Old 23 February 2018, 07:30 PM
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About pep rallies, before a big football (soccer) match, do the fans get together and do cheers? Or before say the big rowing match between colleges or universities? That would sort of give the flavor at least.

And in the U.S. there are also regional terms for the sweet non-alcoholic bubbly drinks.
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  #596  
Old 23 February 2018, 07:50 PM
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I think a reasonably close UK analogue to "preppy" might be "rah". It's not 100% the same. The UK version focuses a little more on inherited wealth, while the US version focuses a little more on people who try hard in school.

The UK analogue to "pep" is "pep", though you may not find yourself needing to use the word as often.
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  #597  
Old 23 February 2018, 08:15 PM
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The trouble with a political "pep" rally is that the tone tends to be stridently along the lines of "We are good. Rah, rah. They are bad." No real discussion allowed.
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  #598  
Old 23 February 2018, 08:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
The trouble with a political "pep" rally is that the tone tends to be stridently along the lines of "We are good. Rah, rah. They are bad." No real discussion allowed.
As people have mentioned here, a "pep rally" is usually about school sports. There's not much rational discussion needed about whether your sport team is really the best or not.

When "pep rally" is applied to a political context, it's typically intended as a mild pejorative.
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  #599  
Old 23 February 2018, 09:13 PM
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My elementary school also had an annual "field day," which sounds the same as the "sports days" Richard W and Hand Off are describing. I can't for the life of me remember what games we played on Field Day, though. All I remember is the booth selling candy and dill pickles, which shows what my priorities were as a child.

Errata: Interesting. I never thought of "prep" as "a kid who tries hard in school." Growing up, my friends and I mostly used it to mean snobby and/or boring. I'm sure there are regional and individual variations, though.
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  #600  
Old 23 February 2018, 10:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veruca View Post
Errata: Interesting. I never thought of "prep" as "a kid who tries hard in school." Growing up, my friends and I mostly used it to mean snobby and/or boring. I'm sure there are regional and individual variations, though.
The snobby is the "rich" aspect, and the "boring" is the tries too hard in school aspect.

The etymology of "prep" isn't an arbitrary designation. It's literally just an abbreviation of "university preparatory school". These schools are generally both expensive and academically rigorous/selective. The term applies both to actual students of those schools, but also more generally to social aspirants who may not have been able to afford those schools but adopted the fashions and the emphasis on academic performance from students of those schools.

It's a younger counterpart to "Yuppie", and peaked at a similar time period in the '80s.
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