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  #121  
Old 06 February 2013, 06:22 PM
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1. Is the ancient nation: Tuscan? Are people from Tucson, Arizona called Tuscans?

3. Sailors

4. Latin, which I believe is the official language of the Vatican City
  #122  
Old 06 February 2013, 06:32 PM
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Tucson is not a US state capital. Also, I believe they are Tucsonians.

But, oddly enough, they do startle easily, then return in larger numbers.
  #123  
Old 06 February 2013, 08:24 PM
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One of the answers for #1 is Phoenician. I thought I saw somebody say it already so I must have imagined it.
  #124  
Old 06 February 2013, 10:28 PM
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Mateus had that answer. And I agree that his answer is correct.
  #125  
Old 07 February 2013, 03:28 AM
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Re: the answer to the previous question 7- Each includes a visit to some kind of fancy-dress event: a costume party or a masquerade ball or something.

So what's unusual in literature about that? Just about all of Jane Austin's novels include some sort of "fancy dress" event, and many of the Spanish novels I had to read for my college major include such an event. I asked Ken Jennings but did not receive the latest email.

As to this week's questions:
1- Phoenician and Albanian (if that's what people from Albany are called) My initial thought was Atlantan, but since Atlantis was only a mythical continent, I don't think it's the answer Ken J wants.
2- the Universe?
3- farming?
4- Hebrew?
5- Some African dictator, I suppose
6- Audi I'm surprised it took them so many years to sue, considering how long before 1995 they used the logo for their cars.
  #126  
Old 07 February 2013, 12:43 PM
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3. The hornpipe is a traditional dance historically associated with what profession?

Sailors

4. What's the only language ever to "die" as a spoken language and then be revived among a population of new first-language speakers?

Hebrew

5. Johnny Wakelin's hit songs "Black Superman" (1975) and "In Zaire" (1976) both celebrated what real-life figure?

Muhammad Ali

6. What German car company was sued over its logo by the International Olympic Committee in 1995?

Audi
  #127  
Old 07 February 2013, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Tucson is not a US state capital. Also, I believe they are Tucsonians.

But, oddly enough, they do startle easily, then return in larger numbers.
It is [color="white "] Tucsonan.[/color] . No I.
  #128  
Old 07 February 2013, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
Mateus had that answer. And I agree that his answer is correct.
Yes, you're right. I'm sorry. I saw it, then missed it, and now I saw it again.

Now here's a question about question 3. We have a word to describe a "military" person in general, or it is sometimes used specifically to differentiate a military person "who primarily fights on land". That word is "soldier". There doesn't seem to be a word to accurately or uniquely identify a "military sailor", as a "sailor" can be just anyone who operates a boat on the water. Certain people make the distinction with "sailing" for "wind-powered" and "boating" for motorized vessels, but there seems to be a lack of a unique word here. This is very strange for a language with as many unique and specific words as English has.
  #129  
Old 07 February 2013, 03:29 PM
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Sometimes you'll see the term "crew" to designate the civilans who work a ship or boat but then that's gets used in the military as well.
  #130  
Old 07 February 2013, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by quijote57 View Post
I'm surprised it took them so many years to sue, considering how long before 1995 they used the logo for their cars.
The Olympic Committee only decided fairly recently that they have the right to control not only their specific symbols but anything remotely or tangentially similar. The Olympic Peninsula in Washington State really gets their knickers in a twist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hero_Mike View Post
Now here's a question about question 3.
As I understand it, for sailors, it's where they work that identifies whether they're military or not (Navy or not-Navy). Soldiers who are stationed on ships (or are transported mainly via ships) are marines. Or at least, that's why they're called marines. I'm sure someone will now come up with an explanation that shows I'm wrong, though...

Seaboe
  #131  
Old 07 February 2013, 03:42 PM
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In the US at at least, Marines are a ground-combat oriented branch of the Navy no matter where they are stationed. For example, the guards for US embassies are generally guarded by Marines, even if the embassy is in the middle of a continent.

ETA: If I had to guess, I would guess our Marines are based off of the UK's marines. Which were more or less soldiers stationed on ships for guard duties and for combat.
  #132  
Old 07 February 2013, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
In the US at at least, Marines are a ground-combat oriented branch of the Navy no matter where they are stationed. For example, the guards for US embassies are generally guarded by Marines, even if the embassy is in the middle of a continent.
ETA: If I had to guess, I would guess our Marines are based off of the UK's marines. Which were more or less soldiers stationed on ships for guard duties and for combat.
That's how I understood it - the "Royal Marines" were ground combat units deployed by ship, with their "combat area" being, generally, near the shore. A vague equivalent would be "Airborne" for any ground combat unit which is air-dropped or parachuted.
  #133  
Old 08 February 2013, 05:12 PM
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If it hadn't been for Barcelona #7 would have been cities I have been to and almost in correct order.
  #134  
Old 08 February 2013, 05:42 PM
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7) Cities where Woody Allen movies are set? New York City is lots of his movies, London is Match Point and Cassandra's Dream, Barcelona is Vickie Christina Barcelona, Paris is Midnight in Paris, Rome is From Rome with Love, and San Francisco is, presumably, his next one (which will have Andrew Clay in it, by the way. I forget the title.).
  #135  
Old 09 February 2013, 02:15 AM
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For #1, would "Hellene" be a possibility, with Helena, MT, and the Hellenic Republic or Hellas or whatever they call/called Greece?
  #136  
Old 09 February 2013, 06:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitap View Post
It is [color="white "] Tucsonan.[/color] . No I.
Yeah, I agree. I was born and raised in Tucson and cringe when I hear or see Tusconian or Arizonian. But so many have moved there from other places that now it is about 50-50 on pronunciation.

Now I live in Missouri, and find that there is an even stronger disagreement between saying Missour-ah and Missour-ee.
  #137  
Old 12 February 2013, 10:05 AM
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LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. Name two adjectives that can each refer to a resident of certain U.S. state capital *or* a resident of a Mediterranean nation. (One nation is ancient, one is modern.) Phoenicians can come from Phoenix or (back in the day) Phoenicia; Albanians can come from Albany or Albania.

2. Scientist J. J. Thomson is well-known for proposing the "plum pudding" model of what? Thomson is the physicist who discovered the electron, and his "plum pudding" idea was an early model for how the atom might be structured.

3. The hornpipe is a traditional dance historically associated with what profession? Sailors are believed to have danced the first hornpipe, and they certainly made it famous. Old Popeye cartoons used to begin with "The Sailor's Hornpipe."

4. What's the only language ever to "die" as a spoken language and then be revived among a population of new first-language speakers? Hebrew was nobody's native language in the early 20th century when it was revived by the Zionist movement to be the official language of the State of Israel. Today it has over three million native speakers.

5. Johnny Wakelin's hit songs "Black Superman" (1975) and "In Zaire" (1976) both celebrated what real-life figure? Muhammad Ali was "Black Superman." Which boxer was "Black Green Lantern"? Discuss.

6. What German car company was sued over its logo by the International Olympic Committee in 1995? The Audi four-rings logo was found to be substantially different from the five-ring Olympic logo. Case dismissed.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these cities, listed in this order? New York City, London, Barcelona, Paris, Rome, San Francisco. These are the meetropolitan areas that have been the settings for Woody Allen's movies lately as he's moved overseas from Manhattan.
  #138  
Old 12 February 2013, 10:07 AM
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Default This Week's Questions

Per Ken Jennings' request, the trivia challenge discussed on this message board has the number seven question delayed by one week. This is to avoid easy googling of the question which is designed to foil those who would "cheat". If you know the current number seven question, please do not discuss it here.

The Rules of the Thread
1. If you use the thread to help you get answers, do not submit those answers to the official game.
2. No googling until Sunday. No looking anything up anywhere (and posting it) before Sunday. No checking an article in a magazine you read last week. No checking some old notebook from college. No wikipedia. Not even snopes.com. No checking anything, anywhere - until Sunday. Only information that is stored in your brain, or in the brains of your non-snopester friends and family. But you can't use your family members as a work-around to looking up the information yourself.
3. If you google, don't post that information to the thread until Sunday. Not even as confirmation of the guesses of other posters. Someone else might still know the information on their own.
4. No guess is stupid, throw it out there.
5. No Hinting. If you have a guess or a reasonable belief that you have the right answer, post it. If you are attempting to use hinting as a work-around to the no posting googled answers rule, don't.

And remember, this is an exhibition, not a competition, so please... no wagering.

Tuesday Trivia! Hyoww! Jump back! Hit me one time!

Your score on these seven questions will not go on your permanent record, unless you choose to volunteer your answers at http://ken-jennings.com/messageboard...php?f=3&t=9525 . Then you'll be famous and, who knows, maybe there will be a big talent scout in the audience that night?

Good luck!

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. According the the old nursery rhyme, on which day of the week did Solomon Grundy die?

2. The man who coached Western Kentucky's football team from 1989 to 2002 is better known today because of his two sons. What is their last name?

3. Israeli general Moshe Dayan and American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly are both well-known for wearing what unusual item?

4. In aerodynamics, two forces act on an airfoil due to motion: lift, that pushes the object upward, and what second force, which slows it down?

5. What movie title hero, according to his 1986 poster, "survived the most hostile and primitive land known to man--now all he's got to do is make it through a week in New York"?

6. The Virginia-based "Altria Group, Inc.", one of America's largest companies, was better known as what before a 2003 rebranding?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these people? Johnny Cash, Johnnie Cochran, Booker T. Jones, Benoit Mandelbrot, David O. Selznick, Harry Truman.
  #139  
Old 12 February 2013, 10:10 AM
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Default My guesses

Quote:
1. According the the old nursery rhyme, on which day of the week did Solomon Grundy die?
Saturday (Buried on Sunday)

Quote:
2. The man who coached Western Kentucky's football team from 1989 to 2002 is better known today because of his two sons. What is their last name?
Sports Question!!! But in this case I will make a guess: Manning

Quote:
3. Israeli general Moshe Dayan and American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly are both well-known for wearing what unusual item?
Never heard of Dale Chihuly, but Moshe Dayan wore (wears?) an eyepatch.

Quote:
4. In aerodynamics, two forces act on an airfoil due to motion: lift, that pushes the object upward, and what second force, which slows it down?
Drag

Quote:
5. What movie title hero, according to his 1986 poster, "survived the most hostile and primitive land known to man--now all he's got to do is make it through a week in New York"?
Crocodile Dundee

Quote:
6. The Virginia-based "Altria Group, Inc.", one of America's largest companies, was better known as what before a 2003 rebranding?
Phillip Morris

Quote:
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these people? Johnny Cash, Johnnie Cochran, Booker T. Jones, Benoit Mandelbrot, David O. Selznick, Harry Truman.
At least I have heard of them all, but no idea about the distinction.

MacLloyd
  #140  
Old 12 February 2013, 10:41 AM
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I think number 2 isHarbaugh.
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