snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > Inboxer Rebellion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:13 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 108,561
Facebook Allstate

Comment: This is going around on Facebook...is it true?

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater

HI Everyone, This is my house. We walked in through a HOLE in the front to
the entire first floor COMPLETELY gone. We are fully insured. Allstate had
just quoted us on the amount we are receiving. $165.38. Notice the RED tag
on the door (WE ARE NOT ALLOWED IN) This is not acceptable, and basically
a slap in the face. Please re-post this, Share or Whatever everyone does
to make this Viral. To make Allstate know what its like to be jerked
around, we are hanging the Banner in hopes of some Media Attention.
Everyone who was helping from the storm, Just repost this! Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:17 PM
GenYus234's Avatar
GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 19,736
Default

House badly damaged, finanaces probably strained? Clothes and furnishings ruined?

Priority: Get professionally printed banner made.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:32 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
Join Date: 29 December 2005
Location: Greenwood, IN
Posts: 5,106
Default

I wonder what their homeowners deductible was?

A $20K deductible would make the insurance quite cheap. It would also mean that $20,165.38 worth of damage means the homeowner, correctly, gets $165.38.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:38 PM
GenYus234's Avatar
GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 19,736
Default

If they even cover flooding damage. IMS, many policies do not.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:40 PM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 25,626
Default

That is the issue, it is impossible to tell what is going on based on the information they provide. Specifically, what insurance they had, what was covered and what their deductible was.

*ETA: Just looked at her Facebook page. It appears the payment was for wind damage. That makes me guess the rest was considered flood damage especially given the close proximity to open water.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07 December 2012, 06:45 PM
chillas's Avatar
chillas chillas is offline
 
Join Date: 09 September 2002
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 11,263
Default

Yeah, as others have said, without knowing at least some specifics of their policy, in particular their deductible, it's impossible to say whether or not it's a reasonable offer. Also, I wonder if the storm surges that caused the damage were classified as flood damage, which will not typically be covered by a homeowner's policy.

My gut instinct is that the insurance company is paying exactly what they owe based on their coverage and the person simply did not bother to understand their coverage beforehand. Most people, understandably, want low premiums, which means a high deductible.

Again, could be wrong, just my gut instinct.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07 December 2012, 07:13 PM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 25,626
Default

I'm not sure how long they are going to leave this open to public access, but here is an album including more pics of the house:

Mobile uploads

It was clearly flood damage to the house. The house appears to be very close to the water. I would guess they lacked flood insurance.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07 December 2012, 07:26 PM
Chloe's Avatar
Chloe Chloe is offline
 
Join Date: 13 September 2004
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 39,321
Default

How dare the insurance company not pay them for something they're not insured against!

I guess they're not as bad as State Farm. They didn't pay them a single penny, simply because they were insured with a different company.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07 December 2012, 08:00 PM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 25,626
Default

The location given in the pic is Prince's Bay which was pretty much built over and around a wetlands. Most of it is in flood zone A:
Quote:
Zone A includes all low-lying costal areas and other areas that could experience storm surge from ANY hurricane.
I am sure flood insurance is very expensive in this area.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07 December 2012, 08:09 PM
DotBat's Avatar
DotBat DotBat is offline
 
Join Date: 08 January 2010
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 657
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloe View Post
I guess they're not as bad as State Farm. They didn't pay them a single penny, simply because they were insured with a different company.
I believe a State Fame agent is legally required to appear and do whatever you ask if you sing the jingle. Not everyone is aware of this policy.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08 December 2012, 03:30 AM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
Join Date: 29 December 2005
Location: Greenwood, IN
Posts: 5,106
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
The location given in the pic is Prince's Bay which was pretty much built over and around a wetlands. Most of it is in flood zone A:
I am sure flood insurance is very expensive in this area.
In flood prone areas aren't you usually required to have flood insurance (required by either the local gov't or by the mortgage holder).
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08 December 2012, 03:35 AM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 25,626
Default

It may be required by the lender and in order to receive Federal disaster relief it is required in some areas. But, if your lender isn't requiring it, you can do without it.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08 December 2012, 05:15 AM
hambubba's Avatar
hambubba hambubba is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2000
Location: Gonzales, LA
Posts: 10,716
Default

Same song and dance - I have a friend who's home was behind a levee (Braithwaite subd) she was told by her lender they would delay her payment. They did, and last week got a letter stating it had to be notes paid in full by Dec. 1 or foreclosed. They're paying outrageous rent waiting for the settlement on their house as well.

Liars and crooks.

Did you know, my homeowner's deductible is 600, and the deductible from hurricane damage is 2500? My damage was 551 anyway but geez.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08 December 2012, 01:33 PM
damian's Avatar
damian damian is offline
 
Join Date: 14 April 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 6,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
If they even cover flooding damage. IMS, many policies do not.
During the Brisbane floods a few years ago, many householders found out there are difference types of flooding. Flooding from leaving the bath running is different to rain coming in the roof, which is different to water flowing down the street and in the front door. Many assumed that "flood" meant "too much water in the house, causing damage". Turns out, from an insurance standpoint, not really.

In the case of a river breaking it's banks, you are probably better off turning on an upstairs tap and leaving it on. Then claim that the bath water did all the damage.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08 December 2012, 02:11 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
In the case of a river breaking it's banks, you are probably better off turning on an upstairs tap and leaving it on. Then claim that the bath water did all the damage.
That probably wasn't a serious suggestion, but I strongly suspect that they can tell tap water residue from flood water residue. (If not, I surely wouldn't drink your tap water.) You'd most likely not only not get paid, but be hit with fraud charges.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08 December 2012, 02:43 PM
Roadie's Avatar
Roadie Roadie is offline
 
Join Date: 19 July 2005
Location: California
Posts: 8,511
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
House badly damaged, finanaces probably strained? Clothes and furnishings ruined?

Priority: Get professionally printed banner made.
We had an unfortunate incident here where some misdirected rain runoff went directly into someone's living room. The homeowners refused to have ServiceMaster or a similar service come out to dry the carpets to prevent further mold damage while fault was determined, so the resultant claim was 4 times what it would have been. And then they lost in court. Because they had illegally built a fence that redirected the water.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10 December 2012, 03:20 AM
damian's Avatar
damian damian is offline
 
Join Date: 14 April 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 6,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
That probably wasn't a serious suggestion, but I strongly suspect that they can tell tap water residue from flood water residue. (If not, I surely wouldn't drink your tap water.)
You can drink our flood water.

No, it wasn't serious.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10 December 2012, 11:28 AM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
Join Date: 22 March 2001
Location: Hopewell Jct, NY
Posts: 792
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
In flood prone areas aren't you usually required to have flood insurance (required by either the local gov't or by the mortgage holder).
http://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart...the_basics.jsp
Quote:
Homes and businesses with mortgages from federally regulated or insured lenders in high-risk flood areas are required to have flood insurance. While flood insurance is not federally required if you live in a moderate-to-low risk flood area, it is still available and strongly recommended.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10 December 2012, 01:48 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 66,900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
We had an unfortunate incident here where some misdirected rain runoff went directly into someone's living room. The homeowners refused to have ServiceMaster or a similar service come out to dry the carpets to prevent further mold damage while fault was determined, so the resultant claim was 4 times what it would have been.
Maybe they were afraid the insurance would try to pull what my homeowner's insurance did after my townhouse was flooded by a rusted-out hot water tank: because ServiceMaster had come in and dried out the carpet (and sliced it up in the process), they tried to say it could just be tacked down again. I had to fight like hell to get them to replace it.

ETA: And while we were arguing about it, DD and I had to live with the carpets pulled up, revealing bare concrete floors (it was winter, and Seattle's winters are mild but not warm) and exposed tack strips.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10 December 2012, 02:02 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
You can drink our flood water.
Are you sure?

Here, you're not even supposed to sell crops from flooded fields. Modern floodwater can pick up all sorts of interesting contaminants enroute.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.