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  #21  
Old 06 January 2012, 06:20 PM
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If it were a question of survival, I'm sure there's enough actual food in my house for many weeks, even if there's nothing I actually fancy eating. Even my dad, whom I nag to keep more food on hand rather than shopping one day at a time, probably has enough for a week or two in a real pinch (though I threw out his salmon paste with the 2010 sell-by last week).
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  #22  
Old 06 January 2012, 06:31 PM
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Even if there were such a law, how would it be enforced?

First of all, what constitutes "food"? Does candy count? Do foodstuffs that aren't eaten directly but are used to make other food products (e.g., flour) count? Do beverages count? Do condiments count?

And then, how would "one week's worth of food" be quantified? By weight? By volume? By caloric content? By nutritional value?
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  #23  
Old 09 January 2012, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
Pasta violates your criteria of not needing heat or water to prepare, no?
Well, technically, yes, but it's also cheap and lasts forever, so one could stock up on it just in case.
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  #24  
Old 10 January 2012, 05:31 AM
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Hurricane time the AtAlls stock up on pepperoni, blocks of good cheese, dried fruit, nice crackers and wine. Oh, and some good chocolate.
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  #25  
Old 25 January 2012, 03:23 AM
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Well if hoarding food was illegal, then the extreme couponers out there are in a whole heap of trouble!

Honestly, who needs 60 bottle of mustard anyway?
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  #26  
Old 04 February 2012, 07:33 PM
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I wonder if the Hunger Games trilogy has anything to do with this UL. In the third book the main character

highlight for spoiler

goes to District 13, where food hoarding is illegal. Hoarding is keeping food beyond what you're rationed at each meal.
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  #27  
Old 04 February 2012, 07:36 PM
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If this were true, every Costco in the country would have to shut down.
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  #28  
Old 09 February 2012, 08:59 PM
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Indeed, or any store having a loss leader sale. Pick N Save (grocery chain) just had a special of 10 boxes of pasta for $10 - which is too good a deal to pass up. I (and everyone else, judging by the half-empty shelves) buy at least 10 boxes whenever that sale occurs.

And if it comes down to stuff that you could survive on, I currently have 2 boxes of oatmeal in my pantry and if worse came to worse I could live on that alone for at least a week.

I don't think any reasonable person would consider 2 boxes of oatmeal and 10 boxes of pasta on sale as "hoarding.
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  #29  
Old 09 February 2012, 09:01 PM
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Has any one else seen the Cooking channel show on food hoarding? I've just seen a promotion for it.
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  #30  
Old 10 February 2012, 02:59 PM
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Are they talking about keeping rotting food around, or forty cases of spam bought ten years ago even though nobody in the house wants to eat it?

Or are they trying to define buying in bulk items that actually get eaten eventually, and/or putting up produce for the winter, as "food hoarding"?
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  #31  
Old 10 February 2012, 03:01 PM
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A friend inherited a house from a friend of the family who had some hoarding tendancies. Her freezer was full ot neatly labeled, dated packages of food -- some of them dating back 20 years. There cans of coffee that old, too. And more interestingly, a few stashes of cash.
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  #32  
Old 10 February 2012, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Are they talking about keeping rotting food around, or forty cases of spam bought ten years ago even though nobody in the house wants to eat it?

Or are they trying to define buying in bulk items that actually get eaten eventually, and/or putting up produce for the winter, as "food hoarding"?
The former, as best as I can tell from the commercial I saw. They where showing people with overflowing freezers, kitchens piled so high with stored food that there was no room to work in them. It looked to be legitimate hoarding behavior centered around food.

ETA: The commercial also showed the hoarders having a great deal of difficulty disposing of expired or unusable (for what ever reason) food.
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  #33  
Old 10 February 2012, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Or are they trying to define buying in bulk items that actually get eaten eventually, and/or putting up produce for the winter, as "food hoarding"?
That wouldn't make for very good TV. Extreme couponing shows do feature bulk-buying behavior, but by itself it wouldn't be particularly interesting.
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  #34  
Old 10 February 2012, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iskinner View Post
They where showing people with overflowing freezers, kitchens piled so high with stored food that there was no room to work in them.
OK, that does indeed sound like hoarding. For one thing, if the freezer's overflowing, nothing in it is going to stay frozen properly; so the food's not going to be properly stored for later use, it's all going to be ruined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
That wouldn't make for very good TV.
That's a good point. The more extreme the better is probably what they're thinking.
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  #35  
Old 10 February 2012, 05:04 PM
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Cooking Channel preview of the show: Stuffed: Food Hoarders

I do hope the show is at least as helpful to these people as it may be exploitative.

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  #36  
Old 10 February 2012, 05:51 PM
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iSkinner, I wonder if the kitchen's always like that, or if they hauled everything out of the cupboards and piled it on the table and the floor.

If that's just a picture of all the food in the house, I don't see what's wrong with it. If the food shown is routinely all over the table and floor because all the storage areas are already overfull, I agree they have a problem. And I also agree that these shows strike me as exploitative. Does anyone know if they return to any of the earlier episodes of hoarder shows in order to find out if being humiliated on national TV actually seemed to have a beneficial effect in the long term?
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  #37  
Old 10 February 2012, 05:52 PM
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Only if it makes good TV, would be my guess. They'll show whatever they can make good ad revenue showing.
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  #38  
Old 13 February 2012, 02:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
A friend inherited a house from a friend of the family who had some hoarding tendancies. Her freezer was full ot neatly labeled, dated packages of food -- some of them dating back 20 years. There cans of coffee that old, too. And more interestingly, a few stashes of cash.
Wonder how that food tasted?
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  #39  
Old 13 February 2012, 02:52 AM
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Frying Pan

Lard looks like a very good candidate for hoarding:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16852830

Quote:
A German pensioner who received a tin of American lard 64 years ago in an aid package has only just tasted it, after discovering that it is still edible.
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  #40  
Old 13 February 2012, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
Wonder how that food tasted?


You were joking, right?
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