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  #21  
Old 19 March 2007, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matches View Post
I mean no one ever comments on the fact that one doesn't wear underware with a Toga right? So isn't that a possible explaination?
They don't? Goodness, and here I was happily assuming there were some fetching ruffled bloomers under those things.

I think part of the reason people are suprised that kilts are not worn with underwear is that they are worn more often to day in settings we would expect modern day peoples in non-kilts to be wearing underwear, and so have troubles with the more flash-prone manskirt not having spankies beneath. Perhaps Paris and Lindsay are actually crusading for kilt-wearers rights to not have undies and be accepted as normal by going commando all the time?
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  #22  
Old 20 March 2007, 12:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Troberg View Post
Underwear in general is a fairly recent invention (I don't know for sure how recent, but know who to ask and can probably find out), but would guess early middle ages or something like that.
That's what I've always thought. Kilts came before underwear, especially before the poorer classes wore it.
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  #23  
Old 20 March 2007, 04:10 PM
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That's what I've always thought. Kilts came before underwear, especially before the poorer classes wore it.
But the poorer classes would have been the first to wear the kilt. Before the modern kilt, there was the "great kilt" (watch Braveheart for an example of one). Basically, it was 4 to 9 yards of fabric belted around your waist with the excess tossed over your shoulder. It was your bedroll, cold weather gear, warm weather gear, rain gear, and work clothes.
They would have been made at home (at most clothing was) and, since there was no cutting or sewing, was about as hard to make as a long towel.
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  #24  
Old 20 March 2007, 06:23 PM
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I don't know about the Scots, but the first time I went primitive camping and tried to pee at 2:00 in the morning, in the rain, in bluejeans, it finally hit me that skirts, long before they were worn for fashion, were worn for pure convenience.
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  #25  
Old 21 March 2007, 04:23 AM
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D'oh!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonWolf View Post
But the poorer classes would have been the first to wear the kilt. Before the modern kilt, there was the "great kilt" (watch Braveheart for an example of one). Basically, it was 4 to 9 yards of fabric belted around your waist with the excess tossed over your shoulder. It was your bedroll, cold weather gear, warm weather gear, rain gear, and work clothes.
They would have been made at home (at most clothing was) and, since there was no cutting or sewing, was about as hard to make as a long towel.
Let me rephrase: That's what I've always thought. Kilts came before underwear, especially before the poorer classes wore underwear. There, better?

One of the things that I appreciate most and continues to fascinate me is how utilitarian kilts were. And I'll watch Rob Roy, thank you very much.
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  #26  
Old 21 March 2007, 04:43 AM
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Ah, the kilt - a subject very much dear to me!
I started to give up the wearing of trousers about 6 months ago and switch over to the kilt whenever possible. So far, so good.
I started off, strangely enough, as something of a kilt 'elitest' in that, things like the Utilikilt et al were not kilts, in my opinion. I have since changed that opinion, and think that MOBs (male unbiurcated garments) are fine in all of their myriad forms.
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  #27  
Old 23 March 2007, 02:15 PM
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Fright

I just realised I had a link to this picture (perhaps NFBSK and NSFW, but that's entirely up to personal taste).
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  #28  
Old 23 March 2007, 02:46 PM
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I have an up-the-kilt pic, Floater. I won't post mine, though. It's not as subtle as yours.

There are pirate gals and there are kiltie gals, I guess.

Oh. I just looked at your profile and find you're not a gal after all. Well, we share an interest, anyway, eh?

Here's my favorite kilt pic:

Edited to take out the pic. I just realized I was posting a pic that is, no doubt, copyrighted. I'll try to find a link.

For the curious, the pic is of Liam Neeson from Rob Roy.

Last edited by tagurit; 23 March 2007 at 02:55 PM.
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  #29  
Old 23 March 2007, 02:55 PM
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And the blokes on that photo are not even Scotsmen (although the one showing off his goods has an Irish name if I remember correctly).
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  #30  
Old 23 March 2007, 03:06 PM
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Well, the kilt may have originated with the scots, but it was so wonderfully functional it caught on. Here's a link to the deleted pic. Scroll halfway down, on the right. http://www.kiltmen.com/world.htm

I don't believe a man has to be a scotsman to wear a kilt. I do, however, applaud the scots for their ingenuity. A favorite book (The Camerons, Robert Crichton, 1972) I've been reading for years features a highlander. No doubt that's where my kilt passion is rooted.

Last edited by tagurit; 23 March 2007 at 03:18 PM.
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  #31  
Old 23 March 2007, 03:28 PM
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Ponder

There's one on every street corner y'know...

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  #32  
Old 23 March 2007, 03:40 PM
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Jay Tee, I did not realize that stiletto heels were appropriate to wear with a kilt. And do I detect a hint of blue eyeshadow?
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  #33  
Old 23 March 2007, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Griffin2020 View Post
Jay Tee, I did not realize that stiletto heels were appropriate to wear with a kilt. And do I detect a hint of blue eyeshadow?
Of course you do - this is the 'real' Scotland, the Scotland the brochures never tell you about
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  #34  
Old 23 March 2007, 03:59 PM
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There's always this up-kilt photo, from some website I know.

So what is really found under a kilt?

The answer my friend, is blowing in the wind,
The answer is blowing in the wind.
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  #35  
Old 23 March 2007, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Tea View Post
Of course you do - this is the 'real' Scotland, the Scotland the brochures never tell you about
And I'm going there this summer (note to self: be careful if someone in a skirt approaches you).
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  #36  
Old 23 March 2007, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SatansHobbit View Post
There's always this up-kilt photo, from some website I know.
Is it just me or does that one totally look like he is doing intentionally? He has a smirk on his face, and he looks like he is holding the fabric taut so it won't droop.
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  #37  
Old 23 March 2007, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geminilee View Post
Is it just me or does that one totally look like he is doing intentionally? He has a smirk on his face, and he looks like he is holding the fabric taut so it won't droop.
Well, I hate it that I can't quote from snopes' pages anymore. If you read the page, particularly the quote from the Daily Mail, 3rd para., you'll see you're not the first to notice that.
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  #38  
Old 31 March 2007, 10:12 PM
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I occasionnaly wear a kilt (and I just ordered another one, BTW). Once, I was in a sport shop with my girlfriend and I heard someone saying "Wow! Unbelievable !". I looked back and I saw a guy taking a picture of me with his cell phone ! Then, he approached me and raised my kilt to see if there was something under.
Fortunately, I had my underwear, and to this day, I always wear something under my kilt.


Here are some jokes about this existential question :
http://www.realmenwearkilts.net/what.html
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  #39  
Old 15 April 2007, 05:51 AM
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I'm betting this started as a joke.

The stereotyped Scot is brash, loud and crude. Of course if he were to wear a skirt, he'd wear nothing underneath it, and promply announce to everyone. What's more, he'd see his lack of underwear as a symbol of his masculinity, enhanced by the fact that he is wearing a piece of clothing usually reserved for women.

I have to say, though, that kilts are prehaps the most myth-riddled piece of clothing there is. They aren't ancient, or even medieval, coming about around the 17th century. It was actually a strange devolopment of the short cloak used by ancient Celts called a brat. The brat was usually pinned around the shoulders in typical cloak fashion, but the Scots did away with the pin and just belted the thing around their waist. This developed into a garment called a great kilt or belted paid, which was basically a brat fitted to be worn belted. It still functioned as a cloak, worn as outerwear over a leine or tunic. Most of the plaid was above the beltline, and could be pulled up to cover the shoulders and head.

At some point over the next hundred years, someone decided that the top part of the plaid was impractical, so they chopped it off. This became the modern kilt.

The myth from the OP probably comes from the British Army. Highland regiments used both kinds of kilts as uniforms until the 19th Century (they still use the small kilt as a dress uniform). This probably looked pretty wonky to the rest of the Redcoats, made all the more wonky by Highlanders generally be tough as nails. It's a small logical step that someone thought the being the crude barbarians they were, that's why they wore the kilts.

The underwear thing could be just an offshoot of that basic joke.
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  #40  
Old 15 April 2007, 05:32 PM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonWolf View Post
But the poorer classes would have been the first to wear the kilt. Before the modern kilt, there was the "great kilt" (watch Braveheart for an example of one). Basically, it was 4 to 9 yards of fabric belted around your waist with the excess tossed over your shoulder. It was your bedroll, cold weather gear, warm weather gear, rain gear, and work clothes.

The only problem is that William Wallace 1272-1305 lived and died long before the belted plaid or great kilt were invented somewere in the 1600s. The belted plaid would have been around during Rob Roy MacGregor 1671-1734 time.

Quote:
They would have been made at home (at most clothing was) and, since there was no cutting or sewing, was about as hard to make as a long towel.
I'm sure there was cutting or sewing. It does not take much to cut cloth, a sharp knife will do. We know there was sewing as well. For one we have found sewing needles over 1700 years old made form bone. The other is the cloth for the kilts were made from sewing 2 width of cloth together. Loom in those days were about 25 inchs in width. So to get a wide enough cloth to be usable as a kilt. You sewed two peices together.
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