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Old 12 August 2016, 08:44 PM
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thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,798
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magdalene View Post
Knowing you have the money to pay for something instead of having to get it on credit makes a *huge* difference when you realize something needs to be done. Instead of putting it off until I ‘save a little more money’ (which never seems to happen and just gives potential problems time to get worse), I can do it *now*, before it really is a big problem—in other words, I can be *proactive* about potential issues, instead of *reactive*. [ . . . ] I can go to the dentist and get my teeth taken care of (some ongoing issues there) without stressing about my insurance not covering all of it, because I have the money to cover what insurance doesn’t (which means, again, I can be proactive about fixing the issue and not letting it get worse.) .
An excellent description of how being short on money leads to larger bills, while having plenty of money can save considerable money in the long run.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery..
That quote (Dickens, isn't it?) is accurate enough; but it always seems to me that it puts the stress on the expenditures, as if one could always somehow manage to spend twelve pence (allowing for roughly 170 years of inflation) less.

For way too many people, it comes out to: annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], result happiness.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual essential expenditure (at least if one is to pay rent, get to work with sufficiently suitable clothes on so as not to be fired, and eat a diet that won't land one in the hospital) nineteen [pounds] nineteen [shillings] and six [pence], plus unexpected medical or other emergency about which one had no choice costing twelve pence: result, misery.
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